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kizofilax

Can the flare stop the canopy almost completely in no winds?

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Posted (edited)

Hi everyone, first time I post in this website. There's this question in my mind about the flare power and landings. I remember reading in "The Parachute And Its Pilot" about how some skydivers can gain extra speed (front riser approach) and that helps during no wind days because it translates into more flare power and thus you don't have to run that much.

I now have around 730 jumps and about 150 of those have been front riser landings (in my Safire3 179) and sometimes I kinda see that it helps with no wind landings but maybe because I am not that precise yet, sometimes I still have to baseball land it because I feel I am still going too fast anyway (no wind or a bit downwind days).

My canopy coach is the opinion that it can be done in no winds, be able to harness the power of that front riser surge and translate it into not having to run it like crazy during no wind days but the flare needs to be very precise. Some other canopy coaches have told me that regardless of turning speed to lift, one still goes too fast sometimes and so you still need to run it in no wind conditions.

What is your take?

 

Thanks

Edited by kizofilax

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(edited)

No worries on bigger canopies (135 and up) but on anything smaller, unless there’s some wind to land into, I generally just slide in anyway. I’m seemingly too shit to completely shut it down and I’m too old to run things out with 100% consistency. 

It doesn’t help that I have mutant feet and mostly limited to extra wide New Balance - not the slickest of shoes. If you are able to find skate shoes or similar to fit you should be good to slide on your feet until the speed is out of it.

Another thing to consider is I think sometimes people have jumped cross braced canopies for too long to remember how much more lift they have.

Edited by base615

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6 hours ago, base615 said:

No worries on bigger canopies (135 and up) but on anything smaller, unless there’s some wind to land into, I generally just slide in anyway. I’m seemingly too shit to completely shut it down and I’m too old to run things out with 100% consistency. 

It doesn’t help that I have mutant feet and mostly limited to extra wide New Balance - not the slickest of shoes. If you are able to find skate shoes or similar to fit you should be good to slide on your feet until the speed is out of it.

Another thing to consider is I think sometimes people have jumped cross braced canopies for too long to remember how much more lift they have.

So I just need more 5k and canopy coaching. When there's 0 or downwind it is like 50% standup/run and 50% slide so working on that. Also my canopy coach just recently noticed that my breaklines are too short, canopy bucks on front riser approach but then it got worse because I noticed a bit of it during full flight!

So, I have been flying like this for who knows how long without full flight-> flare power. I just got the break lines extended so now I just need some no wind days to test =)

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On 6/30/2021 at 11:10 AM, kizofilax said:

My canopy coach is the opinion that it can be done in no winds, be able to harness the power of that front riser surge and translate it into not having to run it like crazy during no wind days but the flare needs to be very precise. Some other canopy coaches have told me that regardless of turning speed to lift, one still goes too fast sometimes and so you still need to run it in no wind conditions.

1) You don't need front riser but it definitely helps.  Without the extra speed your timing has to be perfect.  With the extra speed you get a little more time to get it right.

2) Your canopy will only support your weight down to a certain airspeed no matter what.  Below that speed you will have to put your feet down (or start descending.)  If you can run at that speed, then you can pull it off.  Wind helps of course.

3) If you can practice with slick shoes on wet grass, it's often possible to get your feet down during the flare and have them gradually take your weight.  This lets your canopy fly a little longer (while still creating drag to slow you down) and lets you transition to the ground more gradually.

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3 hours ago, billvon said:

1) You don't need front riser but it definitely helps.  Without the extra speed your timing has to be perfect.  With the extra speed you get a little more time to get it right.

Got it, will work on perfecting the timing then. Good thing my DZ offers a monthly canopy coaching course, will dial up that timing. Also my extra 3 inches on the break lines should help me to get more performance out of my boat.

 

Thanks!

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