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spezticle

Gassiness, burping in plane near 14,000'

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I've completed 10 jumps now, and I'm getting ready for my first AFF level 5 jump.
One thing that I've noticed as a continual 'problem' (or distraction is a better word to describe it), is that as we're getting to 11,000 - 12,000' AGL (I'm jumping from a land area that is about 900' above sea level, give or take 50' ), I find that I feel gas buildup in my stomach that is uncomfortable and distracting. It's not painful, but it's just not something that I want to have to deal with in that moment, you know? So, I swallow a small mouthful of air and then burp it up. This eases the gas out of my stomach. Sometimes though, the little I swallow doesn't want to come back up and i'm just filling up my stomach like a balloon.
I get nervous and anxious about it, i try harder to get it out. I'll lean back, try to focus on relaxing and as I get to the door for jump time it's all mostly resolved itself. But I have jumped a couple times now with an uncomfortable amount of stomach pressure. Once I'm in freefall and then in the canopy ride down it is no longer an issue.

Has anyone else experienced anything like this? Is there something I can do to ease this distraction? I'm not happy with the first 2 or 3 seconds of my exit from the plane and I'm starting to wonder if it's in part because i'm having trouble keeping my head in the game while I'm stressing over stomach gas pressure.

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As the airplane climbs, the static air pressure decreases. If you took a half filled balloon or sealed bag of chips in the plane, you would see it inflate as you climb. If you climb high enough, that bag of chips will actually pop.

Any gas inside your body will act the same as the air in that bag of chips. It will start to expand as you climb, and start looking for a way out... Ever notice the plane starts to smell somewhere around 8-9,000'?

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CrashProne

Ever notice the plane starts to smell somewhere around 8-9,000'?


yes, indeed. I hadn't thought about the idea of a balloon or bag of chips and air pressure. Now that you mention it, it sounds so simply obvious.
I'm going to do some research on dietary habits that may be affecting me. I had never been in any sort of airplane before this hobby so it's all uncharted territory for my body.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/08/01/foods-for-gas-naturally-_n_1723264.html
I found this link and it points out a few interesting things. Before every jump, I've been eating a light meal. This consists of a yogurt and a bagel.

This article suggests that I avoid dairy and processed carbs, providing examples of yogurt and bagels....
so, there you have it.
It also tells me something I already knew: I need to drink more water.

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I was really nervous during AFF and really really didn't want to gross anyone out on the way to altitude. I clenched my cheeks for dear life and called it arch practice.

It doesn't really go away in my experience, but usually once you get out the door you forget you have to fart.

I still rip out a good burp on most landings, though. Anyone else have that issue? I'd say problem but they're pretty good ones, and I'm kinda proud of them.
I'm not a lady, I'm a skydiver.

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As maybe you know, fighter pilots have to take a special diet before going flying to make sure that they will not be disturbed by internal gases. There is a list of food not recommended to take before going in altitude since they are prone to generate gases in your stomach, guts, sinuses, tooth filling, other face bones...and disolved in your blood.

Among the list you can find, Brussels sprout, cabbage, asparagus, carbonated drinks, beans...but also you have to avoid eating combination of food like bread and meat together...and you should not have chewing gum (that makes you swallow some air). Be hydrated too (water).

Remember that at 18000 feet, the atmospheric pressure is half (50%) of what you have at sea level. At 12500 feet is should be around 63% (to be checked). As explained in other posts, less pressure outside your body makes expansion of gases inside your body and makes you uncomfortable.

Now for relaxing, in your way up to altitude, have a couple of times the following : Breath deeply, hold it for 4 seconds, expire slowly completely, hold for 4 seconds, breath deeply again...do that few times. Do the whole process again few minutes later. That should calm you down. After more jumps, everything will be easier.
Learn from others mistakes, you will never live long enough to make them all.

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