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KDEMM89

AERONAUT ALTIMETER

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Hey everyone,  I just bought a Parasport AERONAUT ALTIMETER and it is reading 11k out of the box. I don't understand why it would say that elevation in my house. Do I have to do something to it? It's an analog altimeter so I don't think it takes batteries... it came with no paperwork so I really could use some help. Is it normal for altimeters to read high altitudes on the ground?? It doesn't make any sense to me. 

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Not something to be concerned about necessarily. These types of altimeters need to be calibrated. What's important is to set it to zero at the location you plan to land. Usually there's some bezel that can be rotated to set the altitude. When you are in the vicinity of the landing area, rotate it clockwise or counter clockwise till the needle is set to zero. When you get on the plane and begin the climb to altitude, you should see the needle move in accordance to your altitude. 

To build your confidence, if you live near a mountainous area, you can compare it's rough accuracy with your home location. For example let say you live in a town with an altitude of 200 ft above sea level. While at home, set it to 200 ft (barely a nudge). The drive to a mountain location or town up in the hills where the elevation is know, say 4000 ft. If the altimeter moves accordingly, you can be reasonably assured it's working.

With GPS you can probably find more precise locations to compare, but the concept is the same.

Getting back to your landing location, even if you don't know the exact elevation, that's fine. Set it to zero. Once you get to altitude and on jump run, if the altimeter reads 10,000 ft, well that's what you need to focus on. You have 10,000 feet of travel before you reach the ground. Doesn't matter if you're really at 12,000 feet (assuming your landing zone is at 2000 feet, 10,000 feet of measured altitude plus 2000 feet equals 12,000), you still have a relative altitude of 10,000 feet and 10,000 of travel before meeting mother Earth.

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, KDEMM89 said:

Hey everyone,  I just bought a Parasport AERONAUT ALTIMETER and it is reading 11k out of the box. I don't understand why it would say that elevation in my house. Do I have to do something to it? It's an analog altimeter so I don't think it takes batteries... it came with no paperwork so I really could use some help. Is it normal for altimeters to read high altitudes on the ground?? It doesn't make any sense to me. 

I made that same rookie mistake. Mine worked for a year or so... In the future, buy this: https://www.alti-2.com/

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12 hours ago, landmissle said:

Not something to be concerned about necessarily. These types of altimeters need to be calibrated. What's important is to set it to zero at the location you plan to land. Usually there's some bezel that can be rotated to set the altitude. When you are in the vicinity of the landing area, rotate it clockwise or counter clockwise till the needle is set to zero. When you get on the plane and begin the climb to altitude, you should see the needle move in accordance to your altitude. 

To build your confidence, if you live near a mountainous area, you can compare it's rough accuracy with your home location. For example let say you live in a town with an altitude of 200 ft above sea level. While at home, set it to 200 ft (barely a nudge). The drive to a mountain location or town up in the hills where the elevation is know, say 4000 ft. If the altimeter moves accordingly, you can be reasonably assured it's working.

With GPS you can probably find more precise locations to compare, but the concept is the same.

Getting back to your landing location, even if you don't know the exact elevation, that's fine. Set it to zero. Once you get to altitude and on jump run, if the altimeter reads 10,000 ft, well that's what you need to focus on. You have 10,000 feet of travel before you reach the ground. Doesn't matter if you're really at 12,000 feet (assuming your landing zone is at 2000 feet, 10,000 feet of measured altitude plus 2000 feet equals 12,000), you still have a relative altitude of 10,000 feet and 10,000 of travel before meeting mother Earth.

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

Any idea how to reset this? There is no information online on how to and the bezel will not rotate at all. (That is one thing I already tried). 

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(edited)
1 hour ago, KDEMM89 said:

Any idea how to reset this? There is no information online on how to and the bezel will not rotate at all. (That is one thing I already tried). 

Just looking at pictures online, it appears that the lower part of the unit housing may rotate; the part closest to your skin if wrist mounted. I base this on the groves seen along the edge. This Dropzone thread seems to infer as much;

You're right, I'm not seeing much online in the sense of user manuals for this altimeter. Maybe you can call the place you purchased it from for instructions or advice?

 

Edited by landmissle

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(edited)

I have the same altimeter, It’s very easy to set It to zero: Rotate the bezel clock or counterclock wise, It’s a little harder than the Galaxy or the FT-50 but functions really well, use both hands, one upper side and the other in the serrated bezel.

Edited by Oscar Giraldo
Corrections

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On 2/26/2021 at 9:34 PM, KDEMM89 said:

Hey everyone,  I just bought a Parasport AERONAUT ALTIMETER and it is reading 11k out of the box. I don't understand why it would say that elevation in my house. Do I have to do something to it? It's an analog altimeter so I don't think it takes batteries... it came with no paperwork so I really could use some help. Is it normal for altimeters to read high altitudes on the ground?? It doesn't make any sense to me. 

Think of it as reading -1000 feet. Something rotates to zero the dial.

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18 hours ago, landmissle said:

Just looking at pictures online, it appears that the lower part of the unit housing may rotate; the part closest to your skin if wrist mounted. I base this on the groves seen along the edge. This Dropzone thread seems to infer as much;

You're right, I'm not seeing much online in the sense of user manuals for this altimeter. Maybe you can call the place you purchased it from for instructions or advice?

 

I contacted them, they said the bezel turns really hard, and they were right! I'm not the strongest but I'm not the weakest either lol and I had all I could do to turn that thing. I think that some people will have to resort to using pliers. 

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9 hours ago, Oscar Giraldo said:

I have the same altimeter, It’s very easy to set It to zero: Rotate the bezel clock or counterclock wise, It’s a little harder than the Galaxy or the FT-50 but functions really well, use both hands, one upper side and the other in the serrated bezel.

Hey Oscar, thanks for the advice. I did get it set back to 0. The bezel rotates easier now that I have got it moving for the first time. 

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