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Bob_Church

You know you're an older jumper when...

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1. You made your first 300 loads without seat belts.
2. You were the first instructor on the DZ to belt in students, and got crap for the extra time it took to load them.
3. You remember when a sky van hauled 32 jumpers
4. You've turned three point on a four way from 4500'
5. You've exited at 1700' (as a student with 15 jumps)

Not saying smart, just saying old......
This is the paradox of skydiving. We do something very dangerous, expose ourselves to a totally unnecesary risk, and then spend our time trying to make it safer.

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SmokeyBear

***when...you would naturally use the term "RW", but have to stop yourself so as not to confuse the young'uns...



I still think of "FS" as being Freestyle...

"Hey man, want to do some FS with us?"
"No thanks, that weird stuff is for the new kids."
(Quizzical looks...)

Haha! +1 - When I think of FS, I always get the mental picture of Mark, Brian and Robert at Zhills in those silly-looking, lime green and magenta sit-suits.

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cpoxon

***5. McElfish.



A gear store that closed in 84/85 (I had to Google that one)
]

they were from Texas, and sent out a cool "catalog" occasionally

No one mentioned "blast handle".
I still have one on my garage wall removed from my first rig by a conscientious rigger (F4 pilot call sign Lizard) who "cared" about my safety.

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R-2's
Last hope ropes
Wooden toggles
Buddy jumps
"There's no such thing as too much jumpsuit"

Wendy P.
There is nothing more dangerous than breaking a basic safety rule and getting away with it. It removes fear of the consequences and builds false confidence. (tbrown)

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wmw999

R-2's
Last hope ropes
Wooden toggles
Buddy jumps
"There's no such thing as too much jumpsuit"

Wendy P.



Hmmm, some repeats here.:P

You know your old if you've tried to dock on a balloon suit and your hand bounced off. And you had to grip the binding tape with two fingers.
I'm old for my age.
Terry Urban
D-8631
FAA DPRE

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kleggo

******5. McElfish.



A gear store that closed in 84/85 (I had to Google that one)
]

they were from Texas, and sent out a cool "catalog" occasionally

No one mentioned "blast handle".
I still have one on my garage wall removed from my first rig by a conscientious rigger (F4 pilot call sign Lizard) who "cared" about my safety.

I knew Liz. He was a RIO, not a pilot, btw. He became a rigger in the early 80's.

Anyway, back to the list. How about "throw in the direction of the spin" :o :ph34r:
lisa
WSCR 594
FB 1023
CBDB 9

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- Sentinels
- Canopies with holes cut in them are a good thing
- Blast handles
- Chute-assis suits
- Competitions are judged through binoculars instead of outside camera
- Style and accuracy are the only players in town
- reefing lines

Oh, and to make myself perfectly clear, I know most of the above from descriptions, anecdotes and old pictures. :)
"That formation-stuff in freefall is just fun and games but with an open parachute it's starting to sound like, you know, an extreme sport."
~mom

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After a group wingsuit jump, you see a twenty-something arch back both legs (and with both hands) unzip both sides of his leg wing at the same time (in 2 seconds).

You look on and think “that’s not happening” before you spend more like 60 seconds grunting/wheezing while sorting out your own leg zips one at a time.
"Pain is the best instructor, but no one wants to attend his classes"

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RMK


You look on and think “that’s not happening” before you spend more like 60 seconds grunting/wheezing while sorting out your own leg zips one at a time.



That reminds me, I once was in a hangar watching a POPS bigway do a dirt dive. They practiced standing up, then they laid it out on their bellies, then the organizer told everyone to stand up again.

The hangar filled with the sound of grunts and groans as they slooowly got back up again...

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Struggle struggle, thud was the result of a prototype going into production without any updates being done to the rig, because the brains during design left the organization. Today it would have been one of the best ever if someone knew how to develop it.

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