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David Wang

got injured on jump #24

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On 10/23/2020 at 1:43 PM, ghost47 said:

Thank you for sharing.  I was wondering:

1. What were you and the coach doing from 12,500 to 3,300?  Did he know you were having right-arm issues?  What was your plan (i.e., did you intentionally wait to get to a lower altitude to pull the reserve, were you panicking, did it take you a while to figure out what to do, etc.)?


2. If the coach was going to pull your main, did he say why he waited until 3,300 to do it?

 

Good luck in your recovery!

Hi, thank you! 

So after the exit my right arm was very painful and I knew something was wrong. I was in front of my coach(it was a 2-way linked star exit) and pointed to my shoulder. My coach realized that I was having issues with my right arm and we stopped doing the dive flow. I was trying to do practice pulls later but failed. I made a mistake here, I waited and thought my coach would pull the main for me.  I should have pulled the reserve at the right altitude. The designated pull altitude is 4,500 and when I realized I was below that and was still freefalling, I pulled the reserve. 

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On 10/23/2020 at 2:45 PM, ufk22 said:

So, without second-guessing and/or flaming someone....

I assume your “coach” was an AFF I. 

If not, they had no business pulling for you.

I assume it took a minute for you and the coach to figure out what was going on, and a minute takes you from altitude to 3500’.

So, no “what were you doing waiting that long”.

In the end, YOU deployed your reserve. 
You did your job.

This is an ugly situation, especially with low jump numbers.

Advice; in this situation, with a fully inflated reserve, the proper course would be to disconnect the RSL, look to be sure the main risers weren’t interwoven with the reserve, and chop the main up high before it inflated. I’m assuming, based on what you have said, that you were under your reserve for a while prior to it inflating.

As to whether a DZ will allow you to jump with this injury, the more important thing is what could happen if you have another rough landing (not necessarily as bad as this one). I know someone who broke his neck (full halo for a couple of months), then shortly after coming back to the sport broke his back, then came back again and is now very involved in big-way jumping. He had a lot more jumps than you when this started.

I also know someone who quit the sport after this type of injury, as he felt the financial implications of another serious injury would not be fair to his family.

 

Thank you. 

Yes my coach is an AFFI. 

I made a mistake, I shouldn't have waited. I should have just pulled the reserve at 4,500. I am responsible for saving myself. 

And about cutting away the main..the only problem is that I didn't know my main was deployed. And noted, if I was going to cut away, disconnect the RSL first. 

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10 hours ago, David Wang said:

Hi, thank you! 

So after the exit my right arm was very painful and I knew something was wrong. I was in front of my coach(it was a 2-way linked star exit) and pointed to my shoulder. My coach realized that I was having issues with my right arm and we stopped doing the dive flow. I was trying to do practice pulls later but failed. I made a mistake here, I waited and thought my coach would pull the main for me.  I should have pulled the reserve at the right altitude. The designated pull altitude is 4,500 and when I realized I was below that and was still freefalling, I pulled the reserve. 

Yes, you should have pulled your reserve higher. But you're here now, and here to tell people that it's better to pull a little bit earlier than to try to tough it out. That's a much better position than the alternative "We're not sure why he didn't pull, but it might have been because he thought he could fix it."

No one is perfect. Your coach could just have easily have pointed straight at your reserve handle earlier, and that would probably have given you the hint to pull your own reserve higher. This was a complicated situation.

Wendy P.

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10 hours ago, wmw999 said:

Yes, you should have pulled your reserve higher. But you're here now, and here to tell people that it's better to pull a little bit earlier than to try to tough it out. That's a much better position than the alternative "We're not sure why he didn't pull, but it might have been because he thought he could fix it."

No one is perfect. Your coach could just have easily have pointed straight at your reserve handle earlier, and that would probably have given you the hint to pull your own reserve higher. This was a complicated situation.

Wendy P.

Thank you for your kind words!! I have learned a lot this time. ^.^

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When you were reluctant to share, most probably thought you made a newbie mistake (me included :`D ) by turning to low, or trying to avoid something or whatever newbie mistakes we make in pattern/final.

The fact that you are here, writing about it, means you did what was right to save your life.

Thanks for sharing, this is definitely a good scenario to share as when I was doing FJC the bi-plane was a cutaway if you had altitude.

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