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bamber

Static Line Automatic Activation Device (SLAAD)

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I know those guys. Talked to them at length. Their shit actually does work. This contract is the driving force behind the next generation of AAD's. All the big boys are going after it. You will be seeing a whole new generation of technology coming from this. Frankly I think the guys at freefall are in the lead but you're going to see new gen AAD's from every one.

Lee
Lee
lee@velocitysportswear.com
www.velocitysportswear.com

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Interesting, the thought of a total from 525ft is rather terrifying

What sort of reserve system are most SL military jumpers using now?
It sounds like its going to be spring loaded reserve PC and a round.
Is 300ft a realistic deployment height for this sort of system?

Base gear can open in very little altitude and i guess if your choice is a very hard reserve opening or death we would all take the first one.

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I have seen the presentation at the PIA Symposium. My takeaway is thus:
The military static line parachutist is in a limited time situation. And, the lower the exit, the shorter the time. (Stating the obvious) Because of this limited time, and especially at night, the soldier may be unable to determine the need to manually pull the reserve ripcord quickly enough. Not enough time to look at the situation and make that decision to pull his reserve handle. As mentioned, jumps at night make the visual recognition even harder, or even impossible. (I guess what the paratrooper would sense is that there was no opening shock within the usual time he would have felt it, based upon previous jumps?) And, by then it may be too late - time wise. Probably about 4 seconds?

It is my understanding that this device senses the absence of an opening ( the absence of the deceleration) within a predetermined time and cuts the reserve loop(s). And it is designed to operate only after the paratrooper exits the plane, and it knows when the exit occurred.

Possible example: The first second he falls 32 feet. The second second 64, Third 128 and the fourth 256, Add these together and he has fallen 480 feet. Four seconds. Assuming a night jump, with no visual ability to see what is wrong, the paratrooper realizes something is amiss and then makes the decision to deploy by pulling his reserve handle. Time is passing.
That makes him too low and he dies. He is simply too low to react in time. This device goes quicker and it's brain is more accurate and reliable than a human. Even a well trained one.
I don't know that 4 seconds is the test for this device. I just made that up based upon my static line jumps, mostly from a C -130. Since we jumped (or were supposed to) at 1250 feet, no opening in 5 seconds was the mark for for pulling the reserve handle. In SF all of our jumps were at night on T-10's. Once from a C-123 at 750 at night. Modern paratroopers probably have less time as their exit altitude is lower. This device probably uses a different elapsed time.

It gives the paratrooper a chance to live.

This is my understanding of it. I know the inventor can be more accurate and explanatory of what it does and how it does it. As I said, this is my takeaway. I hope I got it right. Only the inventor can actually and accurately explain it.

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dpreguy


Possible example: The first second he falls 32 feet. The second second 64, Third 128 and the fourth 256, Add these together and he has fallen 480 feet.



Not arguing with anything but the freefall distances. The numbers quoted should not be added together for a total of 480 over 4 seconds. Falling 256 feet in the 4th second alone would exceed terminal velocity of 120 mph or 176 ft/sec
"Where troubles melt like lemon drops, away above the chimney tops, that's where you'll find me" Dorothy

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He's off by a factor of 2. For example first sec. = 16 ft.

Remember you're starting with 0 vertical velocity. by the end of the first sec you are falling 32 ft per sec but from a standing start you've only gone 16 ft.

That's why 525 is actually a comfortable base jump. Not bad at all. in fact 300 ft to impact is more common in a lot of areas. Canopy flight may be longer but the head wall is not normally 500 ft.

There AAD can do it. The biggest issue as I see it is the container and deployment system. I think the army needs to let the manufactures re work it.

Lee
Lee
lee@velocitysportswear.com
www.velocitysportswear.com

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Oops - yeah 16 feet=first second. Guess that makes a total of 240 feet after 4 seconds. My error.

Anyway, I think the device is very cool.
Night jumps-low altitude - can't see much - lot of equipment - shock of cold air - too much going on.....

The device just quietly and efficiently does it's job. Nice.

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There is a huge difference between military S/L jumps and civilian (sport) S/L training jumps.

Altitude being the one that matters in this case. The military routinely go out the door near or below 1000'.

Civilian S/L training jumps are much higher. My old DZ used to go 4500'. Plenty of altitude and time to execute EPs if needed. Standard sport AADs function just fine for those.

My old DZ used to use FXC12000s (the 'old guys' will laugh at this). Set to 1500, actual firing altitude somewhere between 700 and 2300. We used direct bag S/L rigs, and AFAIK, never had an AAD fire on a S/L jump.
A few reserve rides, lineovers mostly.
"There are NO situations which do not call for a French Maid outfit." Lucky McSwervy

"~ya don't GET old by being weak & stupid!" - Airtwardo

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