0
feuergnom

Paperwork for travelling jumpers worldwide - please contribute

Recommended Posts

Hi Guys & Gals

I know that this has been asked already over time, but after visiting a DZ outside of Austria last weekend, we came to realise, that the rules had changed over the winter and we spent quite some time arguing over rules before being able to jump:|
So to spare travelling European/International jumpers unnecessary hassles - not having the right papers with you wont get you in the plane in some places.
I am asking you to help me put together this comprehensive list for jumpers worldwide.
Thanks for your input and effort!

If I forgot something feel free to add necessary points


1) Third party insurance (what kind of insurance papers do you have to have):
2) Licence (Valid through/expiry date? Indefintly valid?):
3) Ownership (do you have to carry some kind of “statement of ownership”? If yes: please explain)
4) Reserve (Described on packing card or extra paper? Serial or no serial? Lead-Seal required etc):
4 a) Repack cycles in your country? Do you accept other countries rules?:
5) AAD (Described on packing card? Serial or no serial needed? Maintainance cycle on packing card or extra paper?:
6) Main (Described on packing card? Serial or no serial needed?):
7) Gear/Container (Described on packing card? Serial or no serial needed?:
8) Who states the airworthiness? (Where? Packing card?):
9) Who is responsible for the airworthiness? (Rigger/Owner, etc?):


Needed Paperwork for Austria:
In principle Austrian authorities accept the rules of other countries – whatever works in your home country is fine for our authorities, which gives you a max of freedom

1. Third party insurance: Card from insurance company (like USPA-3rd party insurance)
2. Licence: Visiting jumper must show a valid licence recognised in their home country
3. Ownership: No separate papers needed in Austria
4. Reserve: Last packjob signed off by a rigger on the packing card (no lead seal required)
4a) Repacking cycle is 1 year in austria :S
5. Main: Must be listed by the Austrian Aeroclub (www.aeroclub.at --> FAA Technik --> Liste der zulässigen Hauptfallschirme, Liste der zugelässigen Gurtzeuge, Reservefallschirme, Öffnungsautomaten und Rettungsfallschirme)
6. AAD: No extra papers (maintenance cycle according to owners manual, there has to be no extra records for maintainance!)
7. Gear/Container: Parts must be listed by the Austrian Aeroclub (see point 6) No extra paperwork needed
8. Who states the airworthiness? Rigger by date of last repack on packing card – no extra paperwork needed
9. Who is responsible for the airworthiness? Owner of rig


edit: I also posted this message in the spanish, russian and french forum for greater input
The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle

dudeist skydiver # 666

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

5. Main: Must be listed by the Austrian Aeroclub (www.aeroclub.at --> FAA Technik --> Liste der zulässigen Hauptfallschirme, Liste der zugelässigen Gurtzeuge, Reservefallschirme, Öffnungsautomaten und Rettungsfallschirme)

does that mean that someone jumping, for example, a Icarus Safire2 135 (custom size), would not be allowed to jump it as it is not listed ?
scissors beat paper, paper beat rock, rock beat wingsuit - KarlM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not an official, so i can't give you a clear, binding answer. my take: as the type (icarus safire 2) is listed it should be ok. besides that: nobody hereabout gives a shit about these things anyway
:S

so what about switzerland?
The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle

dudeist skydiver # 666

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3rd party insurance (500'000 SDR minimum, about ten times higher than the USPA-one), license, preferably B or higher (again, in USPA terms), reserve-card, in less than your homecountry's requirements, pretty much one year of swiss citizens.. B|
“Some may never live, but the crazy never die.”
-Hunter S. Thompson
"No. Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."
-Yoda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NEEDED PAPERWORK FOR CANADA
1) Membership- Either the FAI affiliate from your country of residence or CSPA. (Some DZs will accept USPA whether you are a US resident or not).
2) Certificate of Proficiency- Less than a Canadian "B" will usually draw scrutiny.
3) Packing Card- packing rules in country of rigger/owner/manufacturer (depends).
3) Jump ticket.
Enjoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does the third party liability insurance that you receive with your USPA membership cover you outside the US? I'm guessing not...

I ask because I've seen Canadian DZs refuse people with USPA membership (ie. require that they sign up for CSPA membership) because of the issue with third party liability coverage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reserve packing requirements for jumpers visiting the United States were explained in an article here on dropzone.com in 2003. The regulation hasn't changed since then, but you will find very different levels of enforcement. It's best to call the DZ you want to visit in advance and seek their guidance.

http://www.dropzone.com/cgi-bin/safety/detail_page.cgi?ID=96
Tom Buchanan
Instructor Emeritus
Comm Pilot MSEL,G
Author: JUMP! Skydiving Made Fun and Easy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thanks tom - u.s. and canadian rules are pretty obvious and easy to find out. what i am particulaily interested in are the different rulez all over europe.
up to now I made the assumption, that what works in your homecountry is accepted eleswhere - big time mistake. thats why I am asking for input :)
The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle

dudeist skydiver # 666

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OK, as instructor, DZO and former member of the Swiss Skydive board, I would try to answer for Switzerland. If somebody discover error in my post, don't hesitate to made corrections ..

First of all, you would found all rules on the Swiss Skydive web site (in German and French) at : http://www.swissskydive.org/cms/front_content.php?idcat=42



1) Third party insurance (what kind of insurance papers do you have to have):

You need a Third Party insurance covering at least 1'000'000 swiss francs ! USPA DIDN'T COVER THIS AMOUNT !!!

You can take a temporary insurance through Swiss Skydive at : http://shop.swissskydive.org/insurance/index.php?lang=e for about 50 US$ (validity 3 month, only in Switzerland)

2) Licence (Valid through/expiry date? Indefintly valid?):

Visiting jumper must show a valid licence recognised in their home country

For information : Swiss Licence is provided by Swiss Skydive and is valid until March 31th, next year ..

3) Ownership (do you have to carry some kind of “statement of ownership”? If yes: please explain)

No separate papers needed in Switzerland

4) Reserve (Described on packing card or extra paper? Serial or no serial? Lead-Seal required etc):

Reserve is MANDATORY !!! (No "base jump" rig allowed for jumping from airplane/helicopter/balloon/etc.)

Last packjob signed off by a rigger on the packing card (no lead seal required)

4 a) Repack cycles in your country? Do you accept other countries rules?:

Repacking cycle is 1 year in Switzerland ONLY IF THE MANUFACTURER OF THE HARNESS, THE RESERVE AND THE AAD AGREE WITH THIS LIMIT. Otherwise, the most limitating make the rules (For exemple, a Quasar harness with Cypres and PD reserve has a limitation of 4 month, because Strong Enterprise give this limit for his harness)

5) AAD (Described on packing card? Serial or no serial needed? Maintainance cycle on packing card or extra paper?:

AAD is recomended, but not mandatory ! No extra papers (maintenance cycle according to owners manual, there has to be no extra records for maintainance!)

6) Main (Described on packing card? Serial or no serial needed?):

There is no rules for the main. If you want to sew it in your garage .... it's your problem !

7) Gear/Container (Described on packing card? Serial or no serial needed?:

Must be authorized in the home country of the user. No extra paperwork needed.

8) Who states the airworthiness? (Where? Packing card?):

Rigger by date of last repack on packing card – no extra paperwork needed

9) Who is responsible for the airworthiness? (Rigger/Owner, etc?):

User of rig ... except for "student" (In Switzerland, you still a student with a "A" licence !) where the school is responsible.

That's all, folks !

Blue sky !

Andreas
En chute, si que vous voyez les vaches comme des fourmis, ça va
Si vous voyez les vaches comme des vaches, il est temps d'ouvrir
Et si vous voyez les fourmis comme des vaches, c'est...trop tard!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Specifically I am thinking of Clinceni in Romania, and generally of other government sponsored aero clubs in the country.

There may be others in Serbia, Bosnia-Herzigovina, Belarus and so on; your best bet would be to have your documents in order before you leave home. You could still be found "fit" by a doctor in-country, just learn the local word for "cough".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

would be to have your documents



and because you can never be sure exactly what documents you have to produce (read what the officials would want to see) spawned my question. last time in czech republic the security guy at the dz wanted to see papers i have never heard of [:/]
The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle

dudeist skydiver # 666

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
" ...
3) Ownership (do you have to carry some kind of “statement of ownership”? If yes: please explain)

No separate papers needed in Switzerland
..."

.........................................................................

Proof of ownership is primarily to convince border guards that you are not importing and selling parachutes.
If border guards catch you importing and selling parachutes - without paying customs fees/import duties/taxes - they will get upset.
Upset border guards can make you life miserable!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
" ...4 a) Repack cycles in your country? Do you accept other countries rules?:

Repacking cycle is 1 year in Switzerland ONLY IF THE MANUFACTURER OF THE HARNESS, THE RESERVE AND THE AAD AGREE WITH THIS LIMIT. Otherwise, the most limiting make the rules (For example, a Quasar harness with Cypres and PD reserve has a limitation of 4 month, because Strong Enterprise give this limit for his harness) ..."

.....................................................................

That was under the old American Federal Air Regulations. Since FARs have been amended to 180 repack cyle, American-made skydiving gear is now on a 180 repack cycle.
If you ask Strong Enterprises for an updated version of the Quasar manual, it will say: "180 day repack cycle."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Of course, I should have said "Certificate of fitness" instead of documents - that was what I was discussing at the time.

In a few weeks my wife and I hope to leave for Europe - that is to say, we are booked on flights. First stops will be Romania and Bulgaria. If I find any unusual requirements for visiting skydivers I will post them for you here.

It is as amazing to me, as it must be to you, how different from one dz to another the requirements for visiting jumpers can be. From Lodi California's "Your waiver is on the back of your ticket", to the marathon of signing reams of paper, induction and indoctrination sessions that seem to take up half a day at other places.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aw hell; I'll give it a go. Other Dutch jumpers, feel free to correct me.

Translated from the Royal Dutch Aeronautical Association (RDAA) regulations:

1) Yes. BUt the regulations are not very clear on what document is considered appropriate.

2) a valid skydiving licence, recognised by the (foreign equivalent of) the RDAA. Students are a special case; I wouldn't know the official policy. Dutch students get an oefenvergunning" ("permit to practice") after completing their FJC, which in this context also counts as a 'licence'.

3) [I don't understand]

4) Reserves must be repacked by a Dutch senior or Master rigger or foreign equivalent, as per the manufacturers guidelines. A 'rigger seal' is mandatory, except if if the reserve is packed by a rigger from a country were sealing is not permitted.
A packing card including serial#must be shown.

4a) Repacks are 6 months. I don't know about longer nor shorter cycles in other counries.

5) AAD+serial+maintainance is described on a logcard.

6) Main: serial is described on a logcard, but no inspection cycles are recorded.

7+8) H/C are decribed on a logcard. Serial needed.
Gear used by foreign jumpers is evaluated for airworthiness (sp?) by an instructor/rigger.
Note: this includes whether or not the I/R thinks the jumper should actually be jumping that canopy.

9) Responsible for airworthiness: ultimately, the owner.

Other papers:
- a logbook
- a membership certificate of the Royal Dutch Aeronautical association (or a foreign equivalent).
"That formation-stuff in freefall is just fun and games but with an open parachute it's starting to sound like, you know, an extreme sport."
~mom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For Serbia, as in Austria:
(whatever works in your home country is fine for our authorities, which gives you a max of freedom)

1) Third party insurance (what kind of insurance papers do you have to have):

Whatever kind of insurance you already have. Not mandatory.


2) Licence (Valid through/expiry date? Indefintly valid?):

Any "in date" national licence or FAI equivalent. (except students).



3) Ownership (do you have to carry some kind of “statement of ownership”? If yes: please explain)

None whatsoever. Local jumpers must have gear booklets with date of annual inspection and rigger stamp.



4) Reserve (Described on packing card or extra paper? Serial or no serial? Lead-Seal required etc):

Should have reserve packing card, with serial, date of mfg.



4 a) Repack cycles in your country? Do you accept other countries rules?

Repack cycle here is 1 year. We do accept whatever is rule in your country.



5) AAD (Described on packing card? Serial or no serial needed? Maintenance cycle on packing card or extra paper?

AADs are not mandatory except for students and tandems. It would be good to carry AAD regular inspection card.



6) Main (Described on packing card? Serial or no serial needed?)

Packing card or some document of annual inspection. In reality, just airworthy. Which could always be checked by local rigger.



7) Gear/Container (Described on packing card? Serial or no serial needed?

Same as former point.



8) Who states the airworthiness? (Where? Packing card?):

Rigger on packing card.



9) Who is responsible for the airworthiness? (Rigger/Owner, etc?):

Owner.
dudeist skydiver #42

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sweden - this is what I've found scouring the "Svenska Bestämmelser för Fallskärmsverksamhet (Swedish regulations for Skydiving Activities) document of 2010. Corrections/additions welcome.

---

The license must be issued by an FAI affiliate.

The license must contain the following:

*The words "Fédération Aéronautique Internationale"
*FAI logotype
*The words "International Parachutist Certificate"
*Name of licensee
*Date of birth
*Nationality
*Signature of licensee
*Date of issue
*License grade

The Swedish rules essentially say that foreign skydivers may follow the rules of their home country regarding airworthiness, reserve repacks etc. They are also allowed to jump anything that's allowed under the Swedish rules, even if it's banned in their home country.
The current rules say nothing about insurance requirements for foreign skydivers.

A skydiver who has been banned from jumping in another country, may not jump in Sweden either.

If a skydiver with a foreign license lives in Sweden for more than 12 months, their license must be converted to a Swedish license.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As a Traveling Skydiver, I say, Just don’t be the air Gestapo >:(
Papers Please!……paperwork :(…..it should be avoided wherever whenever possible……this being one of them wherever whenever possible situations.

If you don’t know a skydiver when you see talk to one, B|maybe sell your DZ to someone that dose :)
or just get right to it and install naked body scaners in the parking lot.

I bring so much paperwork most never do more than glance at it :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account. It's free!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0