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5 minutes ago, billvon said:


From police officer (and Q disciple) Jason Bandy, on his Qanon podcast:  "The elite, and the child pedophilia, Adrenochrome … Adrenochrome is the blood of children. And it’s extracted from the children during a time when they’re terrified, tortured, whatever it is to scare them, so that adrenaline is running through their blood. OK? The elite is taking this blood, they are drinking it and it’s giving them superhuman effects, OK? Fountain of youth effects."

Oh, for chrissake. This bogus description of what it is, apparently originated from the writings of HST, and has nothing to do with the actual chemical compound by that name:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrenochrome

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1 hour ago, ryoder said:

Oh, for chrissake. This bogus description of what it is, apparently originated from the writings of HST, and has nothing to do with the actual chemical compound by that name:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrenochrome

One starts to wonder just what insane level of credulity is possible with these people. 

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2 hours ago, billvon said:

Not-so-fun fact:

Qanon has claimed that Hillary Clinton (and Oprah, and Ellen, and pretty much any other well known liberal) tortured and killed children so she could drink their blood, since she believed that it would restore her youth.  Getting harder and harder to find differences between Qanon and Nazism.

From police officer (and Q disciple) Jason Bandy, on his Qanon podcast:  "The elite, and the child pedophilia, Adrenochrome … Adrenochrome is the blood of children. And it’s extracted from the children during a time when they’re terrified, tortured, whatever it is to scare them, so that adrenaline is running through their blood. OK? The elite is taking this blood, they are drinking it and it’s giving them superhuman effects, OK? Fountain of youth effects."

 

2 hours ago, ryoder said:

Oh, for chrissake. This bogus description of what it is, apparently originated from the writings of HST, and has nothing to do with the actual chemical compound by that name:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrenochrome

Can't argue with the origins of it, but isn't that what put the 'flavor' in the kids that "It" killed? 
Stephen King's "It".

 

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39 minutes ago, wolfriverjoe said:

Can't argue with the origins of it, but isn't that what put the 'flavor' in the kids that "It" killed? 
Stephen King's "It".

And Stephen King (the politician) is a climate change denier, white supremacist, Islamophobe, anti-Semite and strong Trump supporter!  Coincidence?  I think not!  

Ron, quick!  Add this to the list of Qanon "facts."

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Qanon is having another effect (besides terrorism) - they are tearing families apart.  28,000 families have joined the subreddit r/Qanoncasualties.  They talk of families torn apart, family members who become sick (and sometimes die) because Q is telling them to not go to Soros-controlled doctors, of people who refuse to leave the house due to the 'deep state' waiting to kidnap them.  It has led to divorce, bitter custody battles and mistreatment of children.  One Qanon believer told her son to not go near banks or ATM's because "the Federal Reserve would put microchips in him."



https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/09/14/qanon-families-support-group/

https://melmagazine.com/en-us/story/qanon-conspiracy-cult-losing-family

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18 hours ago, TriGirl said:

I'll say it again.  All this nonsense is an indictment of the American education system.  Seriously -- where are the (even most basic) critical thinking skills?  Occam's razor, anyone?

While that's certainly a part of it, you can't ignore the simple idea that people believe it because they WANT TO

I wasn't aware of the ties & parallels with Anti-Semitism, but I'm not at all surprised.

It's the same mentality. And the same sorts of people.

 

Not just the stupid and uneducated (they do play a part), but the marginalized and desperate.

Largely older white men, people who's racism and misogyny were not socially acceptable for the past 40 years or so.

First Obama gets elected. Those people have to put up with one of THEM in the White House. 
Then the SC legalizes gay marriage. It's now 'shoved down their throats'.

Then it becomes apparent that HRC will be the Dem nominee for pres. A woman and an "Obama Lover".

So along comes Trump.
And he says all the garbage that these morons wish they could.
Mexicans are rapists. 
Muslims are terrorists.
Beat up people who disagree with you.
Women should be 'grabbed by the pussy'.

Jews are good accountants.
Nazis & KKK are 'very fine people'. 

His people are 'above the law', but those he dislikes should be arrested (without charge). 

 

Then, along comes "q". 

Giving these suckers a belief that they have 'inside information'. Coming from those close to Trump. Or Trump himself (despite the fact that Trump said he doesn't know much other than they like him). 
Giving the fools the hope that HRC and the rest will be arrested and taken to Gitmo for 'military tribunals' (and hopefully torture). 

The parallels and similarities to how the Nazis demonized the Jews is very scary. 

But hey, it gives them the hope that they will be back on top, the way they used to be.
The idea that women and minorities should have the same rights as them is abhorrent. 
So they keep on believing it, regardless of how often the "drops" have had accurate information or predictions (zero).

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(edited)
3 hours ago, wolfriverjoe said:

While that's certainly a part of it, you can't ignore the simple idea that people believe it because they WANT TO

Oh yes, I get the desire to have some of the less ridiculous stuff be true.  I can even understand how some could believe the false assertion that the government would be forcing churches to perform same-sex weddings (of course, just a little time to sit and think about that one should resolve it, but ... reasons).

3 hours ago, wolfriverjoe said:

The parallels and similarities to how the Nazis demonized the Jews is very scary.

Indeed.  And this is my major point.  We know how the downward spiral started and perpetuated (and we saw it again during the civil rights movement, though used to a lesser fatal degree).  We know how to find and identify the truth from the propaganda.  After 70+ years, we know how to be better human beings to each other (and we know how to "adult" and leverage appropriate recourse against things that scare us).  If these things and these skills aren't being taught to kids in schools (what happened to the "citizenship" grades?), then they need to be brought back.  Obviously all the good people in the churches aren't doing it/helping out (I mean really -- what would Jesus do?).  

It should be citizenship 101.  You don't have to believe that the kid with the different color skin sitting next to you is your "equal," but you have to let her in the classroom because she is a person, and has rights to the same education and responsibilities to the community (rule of law, respecting others, etc).

It's so simple that it just boggles the mind of a member of an evolved species that it's still so easy to manipulate the masses using total nonsense, and keep them on the hook for this long.

Edited by TriGirl
clarity
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55 minutes ago, TriGirl said:

Oh yes, I get the desire to have some of the less ridiculous stuff be true.  I can even understand how some could believe the false assertion that the government would be forcing churches to perform same-sex weddings (of course, just a little time to sit and think about that one should resolve it, but ... reasons).

Indeed.  And this is my major point.  We know how the downward spiral started and perpetuated (and we saw it again during the civil rights movement, though used to a lesser fatal degree).  We know how to find and identify the truth from the propaganda.  After 70+ years, we know how to be better human beings to each other (and we know how to "adult" and leverage appropriate recourse against things that scare us).  If these things and these skills aren't being taught to kids in schools (what happened to the "citizenship" grades?), then they need to be brought back.  Obviously all the good people in the churches aren't doing it/helping out (I mean really -- what would Jesus do?).  

It should be citizenship 101.  You don't have to believe that the kid with the different color skin sitting next to you is your "equal," but you have to let her in the classroom because she is a person, and has rights to the same education and responsibilities to the community (rule of law, respecting others, etc).

It's so simple that it just boggles the mind of a member of an evolved species that it's still so easy to manipulate the masses using total nonsense, and keep them on the hook for this long.

Yes. It's beyond stultifying that the most divisive issue of our time is also the easiest no brainer. Given the level of access to information we've all had for so long it is hard to be hopeful.

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Max Boot, in WaPo 10/13/20

 

Many voters are still supporting Trump because they’re living in a hermetically sealed disinformation bubble that is impermeable to reality.

A Pew Research Center survey makes clear the extent of the problem. Among those who get their election news primarily from Fox “News,” 86 percent say Trump is delivering the “completely right” or “mostly right” message about the pandemic, 78 percent that “the U.S. has controlled the outbreak as much as it could have” and 61 percent that Trump and his administration get the facts right about the coronavirus “almost all” or “most of the time.” Perhaps the most disturbing finding of all: 39 percent of Fox News viewers say that QAnon — an insane conspiracy theory that posits that Trump’s opponents are satanic child-molesters — is “somewhat good” or “very good” for the country.

I’m sorry, these are not issues on which rational people can legitimately disagree. Trump’s covid-19 message — that, as he said Saturday, “it is disappearing” — is objectively false. In the past week, daily confirmed coronavirus cases in the United States have increased by 13.3 percent and hospitalizations by 9.8 percent. Trump’s claims to the contrary, we have done far worse during the pandemic than most wealthy countries. If we had the same death rate as Canada, 132,000 victims of covid-19 would still be alive. And it should go without saying that QAnon, whose adherents have been linked to numerous acts of violence, is a bane, not a boon.

Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.) used to say: “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.” That’s no longer true.

While irrationality and conspiratorial thinking exist on both the left and the right, the right in recent decades has been much more afflicted by an epidemic of “alternative facts.” This is not a new development: Conspiracy theories about fluoridation, Whitewater, Vince Foster’s death, John F. Kerry’s Swift boat service, Bill Clinton’s 1969 trip to Moscow and Barack Obama’s birth certificate predate the Trump presidency. But the rise of Fox News and Facebook allows “fake news” to spread much more readily — and Trump gives it the imprimatur of the Oval Office. It’s bad enough that the president lies so much; what’s worse is that so many think he is telling the truth.

Unfortunately, even if Trump is defeated, a large portion of the country will continue to believe a lot of things that simply are not so — and a small but significant number could be led into violence by their lunatic beliefs. The disturbing plot by members of a right-wing militia to kidnap the governor of Michigan may be a taste of what is to come. As Francisco Goya warned, “the sleep of reason produces monsters.”

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8 hours ago, kallend said:

Max Boot, in WaPo 10/13/20

Many voters are still supporting Trump because they’re living in a hermetically sealed disinformation bubble that is impermeable to reality.

A Pew Research Center survey makes clear the extent of the problem....

Unfortunately, even if Trump is defeated, a large portion of the country will continue to believe a lot of things that simply are not so — and a small but significant number could be led into violence by their lunatic beliefs. The disturbing plot by members of a right-wing militia to kidnap the governor of Michigan may be a taste of what is to come. As Francisco Goya warned, “the sleep of reason produces monsters.”

I like surveys because it accurately summarizes opinions and beliefs. I agree with the article but IMO it misses how the internet and news groups spoon feed target audiences. Remember Breitbart? In the absence of FOX there could be others but FOX is very successful in painting a narrative that appeals to the less critical minds on the right. The narrative that the Murdoch family, Koch brothers, etc. like to peddle.

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9 hours ago, kallend said:

Max Boot, in WaPo 10/13/20

 

Many voters are still supporting Trump because they’re living in a hermetically sealed disinformation bubble that is impermeable to reality.

A Pew Research Center survey makes clear the extent of the problem. Among those who get their election news primarily from Fox “News,” 86 percent say Trump is delivering the “completely right” or “mostly right” message about the pandemic, 78 percent that “the U.S. has controlled the outbreak as much as it could have” and 61 percent that Trump and his administration get the facts right about the coronavirus “almost all” or “most of the time.” Perhaps the most disturbing finding of all: 39 percent of Fox News viewers say that QAnon — an insane conspiracy theory that posits that Trump’s opponents are satanic child-molesters — is “somewhat good” or “very good” for the country.

I’m sorry, these are not issues on which rational people can legitimately disagree. Trump’s covid-19 message — that, as he said Saturday, “it is disappearing” — is objectively false. In the past week, daily confirmed coronavirus cases in the United States have increased by 13.3 percent and hospitalizations by 9.8 percent. Trump’s claims to the contrary, we have done far worse during the pandemic than most wealthy countries. If we had the same death rate as Canada, 132,000 victims of covid-19 would still be alive. And it should go without saying that QAnon, whose adherents have been linked to numerous acts of violence, is a bane, not a boon.

Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.) used to say: “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.” That’s no longer true.

While irrationality and conspiratorial thinking exist on both the left and the right, the right in recent decades has been much more afflicted by an epidemic of “alternative facts.” This is not a new development: Conspiracy theories about fluoridation, Whitewater, Vince Foster’s death, John F. Kerry’s Swift boat service, Bill Clinton’s 1969 trip to Moscow and Barack Obama’s birth certificate predate the Trump presidency. But the rise of Fox News and Facebook allows “fake news” to spread much more readily — and Trump gives it the imprimatur of the Oval Office. It’s bad enough that the president lies so much; what’s worse is that so many think he is telling the truth.

Unfortunately, even if Trump is defeated, a large portion of the country will continue to believe a lot of things that simply are not so — and a small but significant number could be led into violence by their lunatic beliefs. The disturbing plot by members of a right-wing militia to kidnap the governor of Michigan may be a taste of what is to come. As Francisco Goya warned, “the sleep of reason produces monsters.”

Hi John,

Re:  'Many voters are still supporting Trump because they’re living in a hermetically sealed disinformation bubble that is impermeable to reality.'

It would appear that so does Trump:  'The response from the former Navy SEAL came after the president on Tuesday retweeted a QAnon-linked account that promoted a baseless conspiracy theory alleging that bin Laden is still alive and his body double was instead killed.'

https://www.politico.com/news/2020/10/14/famed-navy-seal-pushes-back-after-trump-amplifies-baseless-bin-laden-conspiracy-theory-429428

And this from a former Trump supporter.

Jerry Baumchen

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52 minutes ago, RonD1120 said:

It appears the Q/QAnon movement now to big to be stopped. We are the news.

https://www.bing.com/news/search?q=qanon&qft=interval%3d"8"&form=PTFTNR

WWG1WGA...to the polls

Q201014.PNG

You've been bitten by the search engine preconception machine. My headlines when I entered that search (copied from your email) into Bing (which I never use) included the following:

"Civil Rights and QAnon candidates: The fight for the facts in Georgia"

"Pennsylvania Postal Worker charged with dumping mail is QAnon follower"

"Georgia's Loeffler and QAnon-supporting candidate set event"

"Poll: Most people have never heard of QAnon; wealthy, educated Clinton supporters are most likely to know about it"

"Navy Seal attacks Trump for tweeting QAnon bin Laden Body Double conspiracy: "I know who I killed.""

"QAnon is tearing families apart"

Bing uses what you've clicked on in other searches to determine what to show you. If you only like comfortable, pre-selected search results that are likely to confirm your suspicions, use it (or Google, or most of them). DuckDuckGo says it's anonymized; not sure how effectively, but it does seem to show a wider range. Note that search engines are in the business of selling advertising, in the form of clicks. They're not in the business of giving you information.

Wendy P.

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12 minutes ago, wmw999 said:

You've been bitten by the search engine preconception machine. My headlines when I entered that search (copied from your email) into Bing (which I never use) included the following:

 

This is fun.

I get.

How QAnon uses religion to lure unsuspecting Christians

Navy Seal who killed bin Laden slams Qanon theory that Bidens had a SEAL Team 6 killed

Georgia's Loeffler and QAnon-supporting candidate set event

How QAnon is spreading unproven theories through the suburbs

 

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28 minutes ago, ScottishJohn said:

How QAnon is spreading unproven theories through the suburbs

Shitty wording.  Even if they promoted things like evolution and dark matter, they would still be spreading unproven theories.

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6 minutes ago, Coreece said:

Shitty wording.  Even if they promoted things like evolution and dark matter, they would still be spreading unproven theories.

Do you really consider evolution to be an "unproven theory"? I didn't know that about you.

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2 minutes ago, gowlerk said:

Do you really consider evolution to be an "unproven theory"? I didn't know that about you.

The existence of dark matter is well proven too.  Just because we don't know what it is doesn't mean it's not there.

Both of Coreece's examples are incorrect.

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26 minutes ago, gowlerk said:
34 minutes ago, Coreece said:

Shitty wording.  Even if they promoted things like evolution and dark matter, they would still be spreading unproven theories.

Do you really consider evolution to be an "unproven theory"? I didn't know that about you.

Theories include observations and proven facts, but they're still subject to further observation/facts and can be significantly modified over time.

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3 minutes ago, Coreece said:

Theories include observations and proven facts, but they're still subject to further observation/facts and can be significantly modified over time.

I'll just say "whatever" to that wiggle!

However, I will agree with that "How QAnon is spreading unproven theories through the suburbs" is poorly worded. They are not spreading theories, they are spreading outright lies.

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4 minutes ago, gowlerk said:

However, I will agree with that "How QAnon is spreading unproven theories through the suburbs" is poorly worded. They are not spreading theories, they are spreading outright lies.

Can you meet in the middle at "conspiracies?"  Final offer.

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2 hours ago, Coreece said:

Theories include observations and proven facts, but they're still subject to further observation/facts and can be significantly modified over time.

The technical definition of a theory in science is irrelevant to the normal, colloquial use of the word theory when discussing QAnon. QAnon is not science.

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