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David Wang

Skydiving videos are so expensive at Perris...

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8 hours ago, betzilla said:

My mom was always pretty happy to hear I was too busy to make many jumps ("you haven't been skydiving, have you?"), BUT whenever she introduced me to someone, that person would say, "oh, this is the skydiver!" Parents want their to be safe and live forever, but they also love to brag about the cool things their kids do, and how their kids are more adventurous (or whatever) than all the other kids. And they want their kids to feel joy and passion.

You might talk to your mom about how skydiving will set you apart from the other applicants for college and grad school (it really will, especially if you learn to talk about how what you learn about yourself and human nature in the air, applies in daily life and in school), and that it will HELP you achieve the goals you have that she supports. Then follow through on that.

If your plan is to become a DZ bum once you finish high school, that's going to be a tough one to sell, lol

wait,,so skydiving can really differenciate ourselves??? especially when we apply for college?? wow i don't know that

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8 hours ago, betzilla said:

My mom was always pretty happy to hear I was too busy to make many jumps ("you haven't been skydiving, have you?"), BUT whenever she introduced me to someone, that person would say, "oh, this is the skydiver!" Parents want their to be safe and live forever, but they also love to brag about the cool things their kids do, and how their kids are more adventurous (or whatever) than all the other kids. And they want their kids to feel joy and passion.

You might talk to your mom about how skydiving will set you apart from the other applicants for college and grad school (it really will, especially if you learn to talk about how what you learn about yourself and human nature in the air, applies in daily life and in school), and that it will HELP you achieve the goals you have that she supports. Then follow through on that.

If your plan is to become a DZ bum once you finish high school, that's going to be a tough one to sell, lol

thanks!!

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13 hours ago, David Wang said:

so skydiving can really differenciate ourselves??? especially when we apply for college??

oh yes. Being a skydiver says many things about you:

~You can keep a cool head even when things are a little crazy

~You are not afraid of risk. In fact you know how to mitigate it.

~You will bring something to the student body that probably few other students will -- you will inspire your peers to try something new, or follow their passions in the face of adversity.

 

Start thinking about how you can talk about the sport intelligently (you can still be loony about it on the DZ or with your buddies). That will help with your mom, too. Maybe you'll even inspire HER to try something she's been wondering about!

 

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6 hours ago, betzilla said:

oh yes. Being a skydiver says many things about you:

~You can keep a cool head even when things are a little crazy

~You are not afraid of risk. In fact you know how to mitigate it.

~You will bring something to the student body that probably few other students will -- you will inspire your peers to try something new, or follow their passions in the face of adversity.

 

 

I am not sure I agree about the first statement. I've certainly met several skydivers that I think would not do well in a legitimate emergency. They were so shy and passive that I'd imagine they would freeze pretty easily.

Also while it's possible someone might reach that conclusion, they could also conclude that as a skydiver you:

- Take excessive and unnecessary risks.

- Do things that are dangerous needlessly.

- Are careless.

- Are an adrenaline junky that always needs a fix.

Keep in mind that non-skydivers do not understand how skydiving works. What they know is just what the preconceived notions are about extreme sports which typically involves terms like adrenaline junky, extreme risk taker, and the classic 'jumping out of perfectly good airplanes for no reason'. For that reason, most HR professionals would advice leaving out your hobbies on your resume or applications unless they have direct relevance to the position you're applying for.

Edited by 20kN
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9 minutes ago, 20kN said:

Take excessive and unnecessary risks.

- Do things that are dangerous needlessly.

- Are careless.

- Are an adrenaline junky that always needs a fix.

This can be true, and that's why it's important to practice how you frame it. But I just finished a top tier MBA, and not a single person advised that I should not talk (appropriately) about the hobby. I did learn quickly that *I* need to steer the conversation carefully though, or it will be entirely about how scary the thought is to my conversation partner.

If you talk about focus, and how much you can accomplish in just a few seconds, and the importance of systematic training and practice to avoid and handle possible negative outcomes you don't sound nuts. You sound like the right choice (assuming you are also qualified for whatever is at play).

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On 12/11/2019 at 12:19 PM, David Wang said:

does the USPA website say if students do not maintain currency they need to jump once with direct supervision? but not drop down a level?

the rule says that you have to jump with an appropriate rated instructor after 30 days.  it doesn't say you have to repeat the level you did, but that would be the preferred way to see if you are still at that level, as you wouldn't advance to the next level until demonstrating proficiency in the current one.  staying current assumes you are still proficient.  that is why it is 30 days for students, 60 days for an a license, 90 for a b, and 180 for c and d licenses.  the more experience you have, the longer you can go before "forgetting" things.  skydiving is a very perishable skill. 

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11 hours ago, Nabz said:

He is a High School student... unless he's 18 or over that doesn't apply.

Of course he's over 18. It's skydiving. USPA BSRs strictly prohibit any form of skydiving by anyone under 18. Perris is one of the largest DZs in the world and they are very much USPA affiliated.

Edited by 20kN
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8 hours ago, 20kN said:

Of course he's over 18. It's skydiving. USPA BSRs strictly prohibit any form of skydiving by anyone under 18. Perris is one of the largest DZs in the world and they are very much USPA affiliated.

The high school student threw me off, now that he said he was older than most his fellow students it makes sense.

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On 12/11/2019 at 11:36 PM, 20kN said:

So what, you're a legal adult. Make your own life choices.

 

On 12/12/2019 at 12:23 AM, David Wang said:

I always think the same! lol !

He may be a legal adult, but it sounds like actual adulthood deferred. You are obviously living under your parents roof, and the discussion about not having access to the funds makes me wonder whose money it actually is. Maybe I am off base, but that is how I interpret your comments.

Skydiving is an adult sport for adults that sometimes like to act like children, but for the most part we are all living under our own roofs, or on friends couches, and we get to make the choice to waste sums of money on a awesome yet needless expensive and dangerous activity.

it isn't going anywhere, when you are actually living like an adult you will be free to follow your skydiving dreams.

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On 12/17/2019 at 4:55 AM, Nabz said:

The high school student threw me off, now that he said he was older than most his fellow students it makes sense.

I am an immigrant. I repeat 10th grade when I got into US high School. That's why I am a bit older... I turned 18 this september. Most of my friends are 17 or 16, and they think i'm crazy.:D

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12 hours ago, wolfriverjoe said:

Yes, really. The "BSR" stands for "Basic Safety Recommendation".

However, most DZs apply them as rules. There are reasons for that.

Actually, BSR stands for Basic Safety Requirements.  There are no currency requirements in the BSR.  There are currency recommendations in the part of the SIM that is not the BSR.

Mike Mullins

 

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