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ksg00

Surviving a 1,000 feet free fall?

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I'm sorry for English is not my native language.

Me and my friend we debating about how to survive a 1,000 feet free fall down (no parachute, no cord). My friend who absolute sure that it is 100% fatal with that height. But me I see it is possible to survived.

There stories where you survived high fall if you landed on soft snow, big trees, woods, sand, mud, etc.. Or anything along the way that can break down your fall instead of went straight down the bottom with nothing stopping you along the way.

Let just use these 2 bridges as an example, as both are at least 1,000 feet in height.

My friend said it guarantee death.

I said it survivable if you 1) Hit those jagged rocks along the way, as it will help break your impact down, as instead of go straight down the river below. If you take a few bounce on those rocks, it obviously break down your fall correct?

and 2) There is a train railroad below, so if you happen to hit the train below, or a roof of a building below, wouldn't it be cushion to your fall?

or if 3) Strong wind, like 30 mph wind, wouldn't it help your chance of survival?

and 4) One bridge has alot of green trees below, wouldn't land on all those trees will help you survived?

So if free fall down these 2 bridges below, what are the chance of survive? Is my friend more right in this or me?

Please if you can enlighten me. Thank you very much in advance.

bridge.jpg

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Your English is as good as some native speakers on here. Don't worry about it.

However, the idea of surviving that fall is not realistic.

A fall of 1000' would generate speeds near terminal. 120 mph, approx 200km/h. 

Hitting rocks, even with a glancing blow (angular hit) would still be fatal. Plenty of proximity wingsuiters have found this out.

The roof of a train or building would cushion the fall some, but not enough. 

Trees might cushion the fall, but they have substantial branches in them. You are more likely to end up impaled on one. 

If you want to get an idea of the level of 'cushion' needed to break the fall of someone at terminal velocity, look up Luke Aiken's jump without a parachute. He landed in a big net. 

There have been a handful of people who survived very high falls. Every one of them had something (or a series of 'somethings') that kept the impact from being terminal. Most suffered significant injuries. 

 

So, no. There is virtually no way to survive a fall from one of those bridges. 

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On 11/12/2019 at 10:13 AM, ksg00 said:

Please if you can enlighten me. Thank you very much in advance.

Do a Google Search  on "Falls from Height" (FFH). You'll find numerous studies on the subject. In the end, you will learn that Falls from Height (FFH) are the second most common cause of death from unintentional injuries after motor vehicle collisions. 

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On 11/12/2019 at 4:11 PM, wolfriverjoe said:

There is virtually no way to survive a fall from one of those bridges. 

whoa! Thank you Sir for your detail explanation to me physic wise help me understand.

A question, if free fall from 1,000 feet one those bridges it will be a quick death right? As your organs will tear lose due to the sudden stop. So I'm guessing a minute or so you will just see all black and die right?

For sure you won't be laying down there internal bleeding for 5-6 hours before you enter death right?

 

 

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(edited)
57 minutes ago, JerryBaumchen said:

I am not a medical person. However, I do believe that death would instantaneous.  At the very instant that you strike the earth.

 

Thank you Sir. Sorry, one more question. I'm sorry I'm kindda dumb, not very smart.

Which you think there more chance of survived, a gun to head, or free fall of 1,000 feet?

I heard quite some gun to the head survival stories too, like you end up facial deform but still breathing alive. 

But with 1,000 feet plunge, chances are your heart and other organ will be tear lose. And all your bones will be broken, some of those bones got to puncture your organs if the organs didn't tear lose from the impact. 

So a terminal velocity plunge injuries would be more spread out throughout the body than a gun to the head, right Sir?

My friend think a gun to the head is more fatal. But then wouldn't a whole body impact spread out injury would be more fatal?

What your take on this Sir? Or just depends on your luck?

Edited by ksg00

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32 minutes ago, JerryBaumchen said:

Hi ksg,

Are you considering suicide?  

Yes or No, I will no longer offer my thoughts.

 

??? No. Why would I suicide? Even a tiny creature like an ant still want to live, why would a human like me want to die? 

I asked because I'm dumb, can't even pass Physic class back then in school, if I know anything about Physic I wouldn't be asking these free fall questions, lol.

Thank you though Sir. It's okay, in no any way you need to answer my question. Thank you again though.

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19 hours ago, ksg00 said:

whoa! Thank you Sir for your detail explanation to me physic wise help me understand.

A question, if free fall from 1,000 feet one those bridges it will be a quick death right? As your organs will tear lose due to the sudden stop. So I'm guessing a minute or so you will just see all black and die right?

For sure you won't be laying down there internal bleeding for 5-6 hours before you enter death right?

 

 

As Jerry noted, death would be instantaneous. You can get a concussion from an impact of less than 10 mph (16 km/h). Your brain would be destroyed by the impact if you were at terminal. There would, of course, be broken bones and severely damaged internal organs. But it would be the neurological damage that would kill you instantly.
I've had this discussion at the DZ (not surprisingly). General consensus is that you wouldn't even feel pain. Just one hell of a thud. 

Lots of people have survived bullets to the head.  Damage is dependent on the size of the bullet and (mostly) on the energy at impact. Death is dependent on level of damage and it's location.

For example, US congress member Gabby Giffords was shot in the head and survived. It was a pistol, which has pretty low energy. She had a very long, difficult and not complete recovery, but she survived.
OTOH, President Kennedy took a rifle bullet to the head. Look up the autopsy X-Ray images and you will see how much of his skull was destroyed. 

It doesn't sound to me like you are planning to harm yourself. More like youthful morbid curiosity. 

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1 hour ago, wolfriverjoe said:

As Jerry noted, death would be instantaneous. You can get a concussion from an impact of less than 10 mph (16 km/h). Your brain would be destroyed by the impact if you were at terminal. 

Thank you Sir wolfriverjoe,

I sure don't want to die, like I say even a tiny binny ant want to live, let alone me, a human. I'm from a third world country, so where we from we don't have the education about physic or education in general like in the U.S.

When I came in the U.S. I appreciate it alot, anyone who in a third world country come to U.S. it a dream for them, why would I want to die when I have a good future here in the U.S.A. People in third world country would kill so they can come to US.

Yes, I'm a curious person, and I just like to debate with my friend, I guess youthful age thing, you just got to win the debate, lol. My friend say gun is more reliable, I say plunge at free fall is more reliable, etc.. 

My question though Sir, so even if you don't land head first, the impact still enough? Because I heard stories of those who survived that they land feet first. But they were more like sliding down the mountain or tumble, not went straight down.

I don't think you can control how you land if you plunge from 1,000 feet. So would land feet first help you survived?

Also, wind, would strong wind help you survive too? In mountains and canyon it has winds, but wouldn't wind be strong enough to alter a 1,000 feet plunge?

Thank you again Sir.

 

Edited by ksg00

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16 hours ago, timski said:

IF THIS ISN'T A CRY FOR HELP, I'M FUCKING BLIND. Stop feeding it. GET HELP DUDE.  Because we care. 

 

I don't see it.

I see a younger guy with some morbid curiosity.

Didn't you ever watch Faces of Death when you were a teenager?

19 hours ago, ksg00 said:

...My question though Sir, so even if you don't land head first, the impact still enough? Because I heard stories of those who survived that they land feet first. But they were more like sliding down the mountain or tumble, not went straight down.

I don't think you can control how you land if you plunge from 1,000 feet. So would land feet first help you survived?

Also, wind, would strong wind help you survive too? In mountains and canyon it has winds, but wouldn't wind be strong enough to alter a 1,000 feet plunge?

Thank you again Sir.

 

I think you are vastly underestimating the damage done at even lower speeds. A 100 foot fall onto a hard surface is almost guaranteed to be fatal.

At terminal velocity, position, surface (with the excpetion of a very steep, snow covered mountainside), none of that will matter. 

I know a dude who fell somewhere in the area of 50' or so. Canopy collapse. He landed on his feet. The bones in his lower leg sort of 'telescoped' around themselves. They were destroyed to the point that he lost both legs below the knee. 
I know another guy who was doing an intentional water jump. He cut away (released the main parachute) and badly misjudged his height (a common mistake). He fell between 50' and 75' to the water. The impact tore his aorta (large artery coming from the heart). He survived because one of the other jumpers on the recovery boat was an ER nurse. She figured out what had happened, got them moving and called for help. There was an ambulance waiting when they got to shore. He still very nearly died. 

A person falling through the air can absolutely control how they fall. position, location, even speed to a degree. Skydivers do it on every jump. 

Winds would have to be very strong to have much of an effect. The vertical wind tunnels (indoor skydiving) have to push air up at over 100 mph to let a person 'fly'. 

Those winds would have to be blowing straight up at that speed (or close to it) to have enough of an effect to matter.

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i don't see a suicide attempt either but have to disagree on one point.

i have seen a person falling over 100' onto packed dirt and sustain only minor injuries(a couple of bruises and some scrapes) due to a proper plf.  that says that what you do when you land is what says if you live or die.

i have dropped from about 50' after having my wind stolen and it hurts like hell but is usually survivable if you have tight body position and roll like you are taught.  i know that if i ever had a double total mal and was heading in with nothing out at my home dz, i think i may just start tracking hard and try glancing off the river rather than hitting the ground.

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On 11/12/2019 at 12:13 PM, ksg00 said:

I'm sorry for English is not my native language.

Me and my friend we debating about how to survive a 1,000 feet free fall down (no parachute, no cord). My friend who absolute sure that it is 100% fatal with that height. But me I see it is possible to survived.

There stories where you survived high fall if you landed on soft snow, big trees, woods, sand, mud, etc.. Or anything along the way that can break down your fall instead of went straight down the bottom with nothing stopping you along the way.

Let just use these 2 bridges as an example, as both are at least 1,000 feet in height.

My friend said it guarantee death.

I said it survivable if you 1) Hit those jagged rocks along the way, as it will help break your impact down, as instead of go straight down the river below. If you take a few bounce on those rocks, it obviously break down your fall correct?

and 2) There is a train railroad below, so if you happen to hit the train below, or a roof of a building below, wouldn't it be cushion to your fall?

or if 3) Strong wind, like 30 mph wind, wouldn't it help your chance of survival?

and 4) One bridge has alot of green trees below, wouldn't land on all those trees will help you survived?

So if free fall down these 2 bridges below, what are the chance of survive? Is my friend more right in this or me?

Please if you can enlighten me. Thank you very much in advance.

bridge.jpg

Go for it. Sounds like a hoot.

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(edited)
On 11/18/2019 at 6:22 AM, sfzombie said:

i have dropped from about 50' after having my wind stolen and it hurts like hell but is usually survivable if you have tight body position and roll like you are taught.

I had to chuckle at this one a bit. Falls from 50' certainly are not 'usually survivable'. Most falls from that height would not be survivable. OSHA tracks fatal falls quite closely because falls are one of the leading causes of death in the workplace. They have lots of numbers and statics on injuries and deaths relating to falls. The short is that most people who die from a fall actually fell less than 20 feet and a substantial number of fatal falls (about 80% according to the article below) were from a height of less than 30 feet. About 15% of fall related fatalities were from a height of only six feet.

 

https://www.ishn.com/articles/103425-most-fatal-falls-from-heights-are-from-20-feet-or-less

 

https://www.lhsfna.org/index.cfm/lifelines/december-2012/watch-your-step/

Edited by 20kN

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On 11/12/2019 at 4:13 PM, ksg00 said:

My friend said it guarantee death.

So if free fall down these 2 bridges below, what are the chance of survive? Is my friend more right in this or me?

your friend is right, you will die.

 

 

don't forget your go-pro

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11 hours ago, 20kN said:

I had to chuckle at this one a bit. Falls from 50' certainly are not 'usually survivable'. Most falls from that height would not be survivable.

I think sfzombie was talking about a "fall" under a parachute that hit turbulence. Descending under a partially collapsed canopy is not the same as the fall rate if you cut away from that same canopy, so the survive-ability of the two situations cannot be compared.

In addition, most industrial falls are onto concrete or involve other hard metal surfaces like equipment. Landing in a natural area COULD be much more survivable in that the ground is likely to be softer.

 

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i don't know if there is a list of landing injuries for airborne operations but i can guarantee that 50-100' falls are not usually fatal.  as stated, they usually involve partially inflated canopies, and are usually dropped onto prepared surfaces or grass.  this is not to say that one could survive a 1000' fall with a good plf, but there are some extenuating  circumstances i can think of to make it more likely to be survivable such as:  good slope to slide on, one or more partially inflated canopies, thick snow or tree canopy to land on, or very swampy wetland. 

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