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skydiverkeith

Pack Monkey?

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Learn to the precision pack (psycho pack). I have only used that pack job for about 20 years and love it. Though I do it a little different then most others. I first learned it when I had a fairly slippery canopy and have never gone back. It takes about half the work to get it in the bag and once it is in it won't pop back out even if you let it go.

Back in the day when I used to pack I packed everything with that that way, student rigs, tandems, sport rigs, etc. The tandem master used to say it was the best, very soft, and most consistent openings.

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 I bought a new Sabre2 210 this year and it is large and slick! One issue I have is getting the canopy in the bag. I would often have to re-bag as i just was not comfortable with how the canopy went into the bag. I finally decided to pay packers to pack until canopy was 'broken in. I saw Pack Monkey and thought its only 35.00 and I know Amazon has a great return policy. I WILL NOT BE RETURNING THIS!!!! I jumped today and thought I would use Pack Monkey. Putting the canopy in the bag is now the easiest part of the pack! You fold it up, lift it in the bag and finish the last s fold which is actually reverse but works the same. Smooth opening and on heading every time. Also I did not have to 'fight' with the canopy which was a plus. I no longer pay packers! learn more info of ESSENTIAL PARACHUTE PACKING TIPS

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OK so never mind the obvious advertiser being obvious above.  I've got one because my canopy was brand new when I bought it, and I've put about 60 jumps on it so far (Volt 210).  Pretty slippery.  My biggest problem when packing was that everything would fall apart when I was trying to S-fold it, and some of the more experienced jumpers at my DZ suggested I try it.  My pack time has decreased by half, and I haven't had a single pack job fall apart on me trying to get it in the bag.  Definitely worth the $35 if you're new to packing and/or have a large canopy.  One of the guys at my DZ who flies sub-150 asked me if he could try it out, and it wasn't as effective for him due to the dimensions of his canopy when laid out vs the dimensions of the packmonkey.  But I'd highly recommend it for anyone who is newer to the sport and flies a sky sled like I do. 

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I use one with my JFX 94 and V306. I love it. Is it for everybody? No. But it's a tool I like and will continue to use. I can pack without it, but I have tiny hands and my folds come out nicer with a pack monkey. That gives me more peace of mind.

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If only they would invent something easier for closing the container. Since I like my loop short and tight my hands cry every jump day. But can't risk safety over hurting hands. Sometimes I see people having loops so loose I can pull it trough the grommets with one hand. Scary stuff.

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On 8/6/2019 at 7:19 PM, Maddingo said:

If only they would invent something easier for closing the container. Since I like my loop short and tight my hands cry every jump day. But can't risk safety over hurting hands. Sometimes I see people having loops so loose I can pull it trough the grommets with one hand. Scary stuff.

So our DZ had a safety segment on this recently.  It was brought up that your owners manual should specify how tightly your rig should be closed (in picture format).  Most people assume it's grommet-over-grommet and your hands should bleed but there actually are manufacturer specifications on what it's supposed to look like to prevent breaking your grommets, excessive closing loop wear, and wear on your rig.  I'm including a picture from my Vortex rig manual to show you what I mean, but the binding tape is supposed to be overlapping each other, not the grommets.  I was blazing through closing loops every 15-20 jumps before I lengthened my loop.  Just food for thought; obviously you still want that pin tightly secured, as mine is, but not so tight that you're going to degrade your rig closing it.

 

image.png.6ffd53cdc51d43656371136e1bf29a52.png

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(edited)
2 hours ago, yobnoc said:

So our DZ had a safety segment on this recently.  It was brought up that your owners manual should specify how tightly your rig should be closed (in picture format).  Most people assume it's grommet-over-grommet and your hands should bleed but there actually are manufacturer specifications on what it's supposed to look like to prevent breaking your grommets, excessive closing loop wear, and wear on your rig.  I'm including a picture from my Vortex rig manual to show you what I mean, but the binding tape is supposed to be overlapping each other, not the grommets.  I was blazing through closing loops every 15-20 jumps before I lengthened my loop.  Just food for thought; obviously you still want that pin tightly secured, as mine is, but not so tight that you're going to degrade your rig closing it.

 

image.png.6ffd53cdc51d43656371136e1bf29a52.png

That depends entirely on the volume of your main. If you're at the bottom end of what your container can hold, the pin in that photo would be dangerously loose. Because people dont always use the recommended main for their container, the actual correct position will vary and may not match the photo in the manual. The pin does not need to be insanely tight (that could cause a PCIT), but airing on the tighter side is much safer than airing on the loose side.

Edited by 20kN

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On 8/6/2019 at 4:19 PM, Maddingo said:

If only they would invent something easier for closing the container. Since I like my loop short and tight my hands cry every jump day. But can't risk safety over hurting hands. Sometimes I see people having loops so loose I can pull it trough the grommets with one hand. Scary stuff.

I assume you know about power tools?

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14 hours ago, 20kN said:

That depends entirely on the volume of your main. If you're at the bottom end of what your container can hold, the pin in that photo would be dangerously loose. Because people dont always use the recommended main for their container, the actual correct position will vary and may not match the photo in the manual. The pin does not need to be insanely tight (that could cause a PCIT), but airing on the tighter side is much safer than airing on the loose side.

Of course, I should definitely have mentioned that as a caveat.  Currently, my Vortex is loaded with the max it will hold, so that is what mine looks like.  But you're definitely right: as soon as I downsize I will also have to re-adjust my closing loop length accordingly.  Thanks for mentioning that.

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(edited)
On 8/8/2019 at 7:16 AM, ghost47 said:

I assume you know about power tools?

I do, but they bite into your arm hard and after 3-4 packs you had enough :D I still prefer using the ordinary closing tape.

For comparison, this is my loop lenght on a Vortex. It was recommended by a rigger that it should not be longer. This is a V3 fitted with a 150 Volt (tight fit).

20190809_144322.jpg

Edited by Maddingo

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29 minutes ago, Maddingo said:

I do, but they bite into your arm hard and after 3-4 packs you had enough :D I still prefer using the ordinary closing tape.

 

Have you heard of or seen the PUCA tool?

http://www.chutingstar.com/puca-pull-up-cord-assistance-tool

Simple little handle that you wrap the end of the pull up cord around. 

Saw it for the first time at SDC Summerfest last week. 
Rock Skymarket store had them. 
Haven't tried it yet (don't pack my own when on vacation), but the person I saw using it said it's a lot better.

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2 hours ago, Maddingo said:

I still prefer using the ordinary closing tape.

 

I'm surprised by that. Everyone is different!

The old style pullup cords were always Type III tape and very rough on the hands. In recent years, most companies have gone to a softer feeling material that is easier on the hands. Despite that, I find that packing tools, whether full size or extra slim ones, are MUCH easier on the hand and allow pulling a lot harder with less effort and little discomfort.

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I made a wood copy of the Burton quick lace handle to use with a standard pullup cord. The price was a lot better at 0$ than the PUCA tool considering I lost it on the first day. If you make your own, paint it bright orange :D

The Burton handle goes for 17$ for 2.

image.png.8f84c492117be079cecda530400d3e4b.png

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Update.  I bought a pack monkey and used it to get my slippery new Spectre 150 in the bag.  It saved me a ton of frustration and physical exertion!  It didn’t get the canopy in the bag any faster than without it.  However, it took less energy, less cussing and if you consider the random times when I’m exhausted from flying and the damn thing gets away from me while trying to bag it, it saves me 5 min here and there too.

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