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Harrison Carrodus

Stage 4 AFF repeat

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If you expect you will have to fork extra money to repeat further levels you might as well spend that money towards wind tunnel and not repeat some future level. 15 min tunnel was great help for me personally. And somewhere around AFF 3/4 is a good moment because you know more less what's going on and what you need to work on.

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I'm no coach, but leg/body position awareness could be a challenge to some new jumpers. When I did my AFF years ago I remember my instructor used the term "let your legs scream at you" by curling my toes, this kept me aware of my leg position at all times as I had to think about them and not let them relax too much that they flop or go 90 degrees, try it on your belly on the ground and see if you become more aware of where they are. Hope this helps

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I used a mantra of arch, legs, arms, breathe to get through my aff jumps.  I failed many levels and when I started focusing on those things I started to pass.  Try it on a creeper or bench so that you can build some muscle memory.  Visualization is  also a nice tool  because you focus on seeing yourself doing it.

Windtunnel is a fact of life that you might want to get used to.  It's much easier to work on something for 15 mins in the tunnel while getting feedback between flights.  If you ever want to learn to freefly this is a great place to do it as opposed to in the air.

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As part of AFF training, we had 20 min of tunnel. I was doing fine in the tunnel but as soon as I was in the sky my legs were at 90 degrees.

What worked for me was to practice on a chair, elevated from the floor. I find that when you practice on the floor, you have a bigger surface in contact to stabilize your whole body. When you move one part of your body, it doesn't affect the rest of your body as much because friction is more important. On the chair, you only have a small surface touching and you can feel the interaction of your arms and legs. If your try the chair, make sure that you are placing your hips on it and not your chest to simulate free fall position. By doing this, I was able to build muscle memory from looking at my legs and feeling how much I was pushing on them.

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Various ground and air techniques that can help:
Wind tunnel works. Tapping heels together in freefall can help, as it helps remind you where your legs are positioned. Trying to point toes in freefall can help, as helps get one to extend the legs.

Practice on the ground, lying on belly on floor arching, with legs at the 45 deg position, feet up against a couch -- that way one can push with the legs to get the feeling of pushing against the air. While simultaneously arching, which otherwise might make one pull the legs up too much.

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On 4/27/2019 at 7:53 PM, pchapman said:

Various ground and air techniques that can help:
Wind tunnel works. Tapping heels together in freefall can help, as it helps remind you where your legs are positioned. Trying to point toes in freefall can help, as helps get one to extend the legs.

Practice on the ground, lying on belly on floor arching, with legs at the 45 deg position, feet up against a couch -- that way one can push with the legs to get the feeling of pushing against the air. While simultaneously arching, which otherwise might make one pull the legs up too much.

I would second this advice. I was nicknamed "Legs" at my DZ as a young jumper, not because my legs are sooooo sexy, but because I forgot they were there when I left the plane. They called me Legs and nothing else for a year or more so I wouldn't forget they existed. For me it was as easy as remembering them. Tapping toes helps, pointing toes helps, but for me, most of all, remembering that they were there, and I needed them to fly my body, was the biggest factor. It took several hours of tunnel time and a couple hundred jumps to get them doing what they needed to do. Keep in mind, I'm a slow learner and had developed bad habits early on in skydiving, so you may not need the time I needed to get my legs where they needed to be. As with many things in this sport, awareness counts for a lot. So be aware of your legs on your next jump, and press those shins down until you feel the tension, and keep pressing until you get the results you and your instructors want. 

Everyone thinks "I'm doing what I should be doing" until they see the video. I promise, your instructors aren't lying to you. You may think your legs are doing one thing, but if your AFFI says something else, they probably (not always but most likely) know better.

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On 4/30/2019 at 7:06 AM, Luta said:

We don't have student progression structured like that in Australia

From what I know, the program appears to be structured about the same as USPA, just called level 2 rather than B, level 3 rather than C.

If not, what are the advancement criteria for level 2 and 3?

I would be disappointed (pissed off, really) with any AFF I that allowed a student to get through a release dive, let alone singe side, without first mastering hover control (proper body position, no backsliding, turn dampening).

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I had the same issue, EVERY one of my AFF videos had the "straighten your legs" sign lol...  Tunnel over the winter helped a whole lot that now its natural and I don't have to think about it.

I would do some tunnel and as they say practice makes perfect.

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