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ChrisJulsen

Troubled.

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I have 12 total jumps and have overcame most of my fear of exiting the plane. I have had almost everything that can go wrong with my exits that can possibly go wrong, from spinning upside down for the first 4000 ft to diving out into barell rolls and flips. I just jumped today and failed my aff 9 which was a dive out and delta track to the instructor. I just figured out how to exit poised without ending up upside down, and now the diving exit is killing me. On this dive flow, my exit was bad from the start, and most of the freefall was just trying to get stable. We went back up for just a fun jump, basically trying to get my confidence back, and the 2nd was even worse, to the point I wasnt even altitude aware. I think what made the day worse was watching other students pass their dive flows, while I kept failing. I think I may be trying too hard to get thru the process of getting licensed that I am losing the enjoyment of the dive. I am very hard on myself, and try to see my positive traits. I am thinking this is more of a mental wall block than anything else. I think I will take a break for a few weeks, and go use my time in the tunnel. Thanks for listening.

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I think its beneficial to try and just enjoy the journey. No matter how good you get, you'll always have jumps that don't go right or just present new challenges, getting through those with all the "ahaa!" moments is what keeps me thirsty.

Sounds like a bit of tunnel wouldn't hurt (it never really does!), but just try to stay current, and talk it out with your instructors.

Relaaaaaaaaaaaax! :)
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ChrisJulsen

I have 12 total jumps and have overcame most of my fear of exiting the plane. I have had almost everything that can go wrong with my exits that can possibly go wrong, from spinning upside down for the first 4000 ft to diving out into barell rolls and flips. I just jumped today and failed my aff 9 which was a dive out and delta track to the instructor. I just figured out how to exit poised without ending up upside down, and now the diving exit is killing me. On this dive flow, my exit was bad from the start, and most of the freefall was just trying to get stable. We went back up for just a fun jump, basically trying to get my confidence back, and the 2nd was even worse, to the point I wasnt even altitude aware. I think what made the day worse was watching other students pass their dive flows, while I kept failing. I think I may be trying too hard to get thru the process of getting licensed that I am losing the enjoyment of the dive. I am very hard on myself, and try to see my positive traits. I am thinking this is more of a mental wall block than anything else. I think I will take a break for a few weeks, and go use my time in the tunnel. Thanks for listening.



This is the story of pretty much every student. It's no big deal. You just need more jumps. A diving exit can be difficult. I know people with 300 jumps who screw it up 50% of the time. It takes practice. As long as you're being safe, the rest is fairly inconsequential at this point. It will get easier with time.

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When I started in the early 80's, the biggest concern for instructors about their students was "Is he going to pull?"

If they felt good about that, then you were allowed to go do 10 sec delays until you figured it out. Then 15's until you did two 360 degree turns in freefall.

stop worrying so much about stability. Find a wind tunnel and go do 15 minutes in that to help out if one is nearby in a city somewhere, but as long as you are pulling and flying and landing safely, the rest will come eventually.

I spent the first 15-20 jumps going end over end in freefall and various configurations of unstable, mostly spinning.

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Westerly

*** I have 12 total jumps and have overcame most of my fear of exiting the plane. I have had almost everything that can go wrong with my exits that can possibly go wrong, from spinning upside down for the first 4000 ft to diving out into barell rolls and flips. I just jumped today and failed my aff 9 which was a dive out and delta track to the instructor. I just figured out how to exit poised without ending up upside down, and now the diving exit is killing me. On this dive flow, my exit was bad from the start, and most of the freefall was just trying to get stable. We went back up for just a fun jump, basically trying to get my confidence back, and the 2nd was even worse, to the point I wasnt even altitude aware. I think what made the day worse was watching other students pass their dive flows, while I kept failing. I think I may be trying too hard to get thru the process of getting licensed that I am losing the enjoyment of the dive. I am very hard on myself, and try to see my positive traits. I am thinking this is more of a mental wall block than anything else. I think I will take a break for a few weeks, and go use my time in the tunnel. Thanks for listening.



This is the story of pretty much every student. It's no big deal. You just need more jumps. A diving exit can be difficult. I know people with 300 jumps who screw it up 50% of the time. It takes practice. As long as you're being safe, the rest is fairly inconsequential at this point. It will get easier with time.

Rubbish.

That sounds to me that there are a bunch of crap instructors out there.
My computer beat me at chess, It was no match for me at kickboxing....

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Go to a wind tunnel, even if you have to travel. For fundamental things like getting and staying stable, turns, fall rate control, etc., good tunnel instruction will help you conquer problems much quicker and with a lot less frustration.
Chuck Akers
D-10855
Houston, TX

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Thank you for all the responses. After cooling off and sleeping on it, I have had time to think about it all. I have beaten the fear of this sport, and genuinely love jumping out of the plane, along with the awesome canopy rides. I even love the landings, even when i faceplant half of my landings, but am getting better at when to flare. I really think all of my problems stem from the exit. Once I can exit and ride the hill, rather than get turned over, it will allow me the time to not rush the dive flow. So, I am going to just chill, and wait until next weekend, and try and fix my exits. I am also planning on getting with an instructor at Ifly. There are 2 of them that are also skydivers from my dz, so they will know exactly my dive flow and hopefully we can correct my problems, because even though I refuse to do amusement park rides, I fricken love skydiving.

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Well, welcome. Sounds like you are as screwed as the rest of us. :P

It sounds like you are overthinking it. I know that's what I did. I had to reach the point where it became more 'natural' and where I didn't have to think about exactly what I was doing at each point. It will come.

Exits can be tough. You don't have as much control until you reach terminal, so 'finding the groove' can be a challenge.

Unfortunately, the tunnel doesn't do a very good job with that.

However, one thing you can work on is recovering stability. It sounds like you have an issue that once it 'goes south', getting back to stable, belly to earth is not easy for you.
Discuss this with the coach you will be working with.
"There are NO situations which do not call for a French Maid outfit." Lucky McSwervy

"~ya don't GET old by being weak & stupid!" - Airtwardo

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Actually getting stable is what I am actually good at, its the fact that when I get stable, I have this clock in my head, and I start rushing everything. I swear, i think its an imformation overload. I tried to track, once I got stable, and I dont remember to straighten my legs or pull my arms back. I also am having an issue with not seeing all my instructors hand signals. They have said with more experience, My tunnel vision will expand. I believe you are correct, that I am over thinking it. I plan on talking with the instructors at my dz, and go over my last 2 videos. I will plan to attempt to just jump and get my exits corrected, and if the exit goes smooth, than go thru the dive flow. If the exit doesnt go smooth, and if I lose too much time getting stable, than I will just enjoy the freefall and try again. I just have to try and not beat myself up when it doesnt go well. It is tough being a pessimist, but I do try and look at my positive skills. I honestly cant believe I have jumped 12 times now. After my first tandem, All I knew was I was no longer in the plane. Once we were on the ground, I was white as a sheet and thank God I didnt eat beforehand. 😂

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ChrisJulsen

I have 12 total jumps and have overcame most of my fear of exiting the plane. I have had almost everything that can go wrong with my exits that can possibly go wrong, from spinning upside down for the first 4000 ft to diving out into barell rolls and flips. I just jumped today and failed my aff 9 which was a dive out and delta track to the instructor. I just figured out how to exit poised without ending up upside down, and now the diving exit is killing me. On this dive flow, my exit was bad from the start, and most of the freefall was just trying to get stable. We went back up for just a fun jump, basically trying to get my confidence back, and the 2nd was even worse, to the point I wasnt even altitude aware. I think what made the day worse was watching other students pass their dive flows, while I kept failing. I think I may be trying too hard to get thru the process of getting licensed that I am losing the enjoyment of the dive. I am very hard on myself, and try to see my positive traits. I am thinking this is more of a mental wall block than anything else. I think I will take a break for a few weeks, and go use my time in the tunnel. Thanks for listening.



Not sure what aircraft you are using, but once out the door, that becomes pretty irrelevant. Forget about the license thing, that will come anyway if you stick with it. Its irrelevant at this point.

And don't compare yourself to others, everyone is different, there will always be people who progress faster or slower. Forget them.

Think about where the air flow is coming from. Initially it will be coming from the front of the plane towards the back, from both the prop blast, and the forward momentum of the aircraft itself. As you drop below the aircraft, as your forward momentum washes off, the airflow changes to come from below.

You've been taught to present your belly to the relative wind in FF. The same rule applies throughout the jump. On exit, present your belly to the relative wind. It doesn't matter if you are head up, head down or sideways. If you dive straight out, you need to do a half roll to present your belly. Hold the position and you will transit naturally to a stable face to earth FF.

If you are unstable, flip over, or start to turn or spin, that comes from rigidity, somewhere in your arms or legs (most likely) As every student gets hammered into them, the key is to relax.

Think about long hair blowing in the wind. That's what your arms and legs need to be doing. The wind will do the work, you don't have to fight it. Head and shoulders back, and arms and legs blowing in the wind. Even if your arms and legs are asymmetric, if they are really relaxed this won't cause a problem.

Tension comes from nervousness, which itself comes from several directions. I'd suggest your current nervousness comes from the fear of screwing up the jump, which just makes things worse. Plus you are prolly trying to rush things.

The thing to remember is you have plenty of time in your FF to sort things out, so it doesn't matter if it takes a few extra seconds to get things right.

If you are really struggling for stability, the delta is your best friend. Even straight out the door, if you adopt a delta it will put you head down and stable reasonably quickly. Then you can transition back to belly to earth.

It all comes down to self confidence. Focus on the positive things you can already do well, and don't stew on the negatives. With confidence comes the ability to really relax.

Then it will all suddenly all come together, and you'll be wondering where all the problems came from.

It'll happen. Rome wasn't built in a day.

ETA: And just remember, every skydiver you'll ever meet, was once a student. Any that claim they never ever had a problem, is a stone cold liar.
My computer beat me at chess, It was no match for me at kickboxing....

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yoink

***

I spent the first 15-20 jumps going end over end in freefall and various configurations of unstable, mostly spinning.



I miss static line. Good times! :D:D

If you are really good at instability, you should be able to tie a reef knot and bowline before deployment....
My computer beat me at chess, It was no match for me at kickboxing....

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Thanks again y'all. A skydiver gave me some advice that Im going to try my next diving exit. An older military vet, gave me the advice to look at the wingtip and wave at the plane as I dive out. I seen my last 2 exits and I just dove straight out without presenting to the wind. More than likely I am still scared, but not as bad as my first couple. I have always been a nervous tester, even when I was in martial arts. I promise on my next few skydives, I am just going to focus on having fun vs stressing over the test. I have very good canopy skills, so good that my instructors forget which one I am, and are usually giving me directions while staring at a different student. 😂 I love skydiving. Is it normal to wonder if my rig is thinking about me too?

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I failed most AFF jumps except 1 and 6 largely because of exits. I would be so scared of the exit it would mess me up even though I do alright on the jump. I'm at 550 jumps after a year and a half so you can do it :)

Quick tips:
1. Visualize success and dive flow in the plane
2. Take your time in the door and take a deep breath
3. Once out just arch regardless if it's poised, floater or diving. You might tumble but like a badminton shuttlecock you will get belly to earth quick.

Ask your instructors about the hill as you leave the plane. Understanding riding down the hill is good knowledge to have for belly and freefly. A good understanding will also help with the mechanics of a dive exit.

And just relax :)

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Update: I went to the wind tunnel the following wednesday, and worked on moving forward during freefall, and also my staying stable during deployment. I had another one of my usual rough diving exits, and for a moment thought the dive flow was fubar. I got stable, moved forward and was able to dock with my instructor a few times. I passed the dive flow and than was able to track on my next dive flow. Tracking kicks ass. I havent looked down while tracking, but it felt like I was hauling ass. I am grateful for the many skydivers that are on here and at my dz, for the advice and just being there for moral support. Thank you everyone and Blue Skies.

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