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sundevil777

Auto Gearheads - mass air flow sensor's relation to throttle body cleaning

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The patient:
2008 Volvo S60 2.5T (turbo inline 5 cylinder) 95k miles
My dealer said that the throttle body should be cleaned after starting a job to replace the mass airflow sensor, saying that it is dirty and will contribute greatly to the early failure of the replacement sensor.

It doesn't seem that the condition of the throttle body could be related to the sensor, as the sensor is upstream of the throttle body. So, what do you think?
People are sick and tired of being told that ordinary and decent people are fed up in this country with being sick and tired. I’m certainly not, and I’m sick and tired of being told that I am

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My brother (the gearhead) said that you're right that the mass airflow sensor and the throttle body have nothing to do with each other. However, if the throttle body is dirty, you should clean it. Period.

Wendy P.
There is nothing more dangerous than breaking a basic safety rule and getting away with it. It removes fear of the consequences and builds false confidence. (tbrown)

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Hi Cliff,

Quote

My dealer said



IMO that was your first mistake.

A '75 Volvo is the car that I owned longer than any other; 13yrs.

My experience with my local Volvo dealer ( and all dealers IMO ) is that they take their customers for idiots & just want your money. The insanity that I have had dealer Svc Mgrs tell me boggles the mind.

End of rant,

Jerry Baumchen

PS) Wendy's info is correct.

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JerryBaumchen

Hi Cliff,

Quote

My dealer said



IMO that was your first mistake.

A '75 Volvo is the car that I owned longer than any other; 13yrs.

My experience with my local Volvo dealer ( and all dealers IMO ) is that they take their customers for idiots & just want your money. The insanity that I have had dealer Svc Mgrs tell me boggles the mind.

End of rant,

Jerry Baumchen

PS) Wendy's info is correct.

It's best to go with an independent and reputable mechanic that you trust.

In some cases, when you buy a new vehicle, you can include a service plan where you just show up, they do the maintenance and you drive off without having to pay. It's already included in the monthly payments on the vehicle.

But repairs not covered under warranty, best to do what I said in the first paragraph.
"Mediocre people don't like high achievers, and high achievers don't like mediocre people." - SIX TIME National Champion coach Nick Saban

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>It doesn't seem that the condition of the throttle body could be related to the
>sensor, as the sensor is upstream of the throttle body. So, what do you think?

It doesn't.

However, a _very_ dirty throttle body can give you symptoms that might lead one to believe that the airflow sensor is bad (hesitation, rough idle, "stumbling") and thus make people think they are related.

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Cant say I know much about Volvos, other than I drove a 244 in high school, but until this month (Dec, 2017), this has never even an issue of concern (or awareness). Someone on Corvette Forum asked about this, as well this week. It seems their dealership also was selling this "service" on a car with less than 20,000 miles on it.

I'm Thinking the newest Snake Oil .

I've got over 400,000 miles on Corvettes, and it's not been an issue, and from the noise elsewhere, it should not be for your car.
lisa
WSCR 594
FB 1023
CBDB 9

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It depends on what is causing the throttle body to become "Dirty". Cars have an emission system known as a PCV valve that vents the crank case gasses into the air duct which then flows through the throttle body and back into the engine to get burned up. When the PCV valve goes bad more than just gas escapes the crank case (read oil) which then leads to a dirty throttle body and air system. You noted that the MAS is "upstream" from the throttle body (most likely right at the airbox?), the problem as I see it is that when everything gets gummed up oil starts to drip back along the air intake after the car is shut off. This would then lead to MAS failure. I have seen air filters totally soaked with engine oil from this exact problem.
P.S. I am not a mechanic, just a guy with tools. I have never seen the car you speak of and have no clue about it. I have had bad PCV valves in several different vehicles that led to oil in the throttle body and airbox.
P.P.S. Cleaning a throttle body is easy to do yourself. Degreaser and a toothbrush. Another symptom of a dirty throttle body is irregular idle.

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