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IJskonijn

Non-permanent marking of line attachment points

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Quick search through these forums result in many different opinions about marking line attachment points for ease of identification during packing. Some of you are absolutely convinced marking with [favourite-marker-type] can do no harm, some of you are already lighting the torches to burn people at the stake for doing it.

That got me thinking: would there be a method for non-permanent marking of line attachment points without using any marker or pen or anything liquid based, thus sidestepping that whole rabbit hole. Do any of you have any experience with tying small pieces of coloured string through the line attachment points (no piercing of the actual tape) for this purpose? Does it actually help packing? Does it show any extra wear on the line attachment tapes? What exact material did you use for it? I'm thinking something nylon, since the tape is already nylon so I wouldn't expect any adverse material/material interactions.

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Just use some markers. They work perfectly fine. I've seen it done on several canopies. Also, the nylon and polyester webbing used on canopies has been around since long before skydiving existed and people have been using markers on them since the start of time. For example, people commonly use markers to mark the center of nylon ropes for use in rock climbing, caving and canyoneering applications, and there has never been a fatality or incident attributed to it.

If you're really worried about it, you can mark just the part of the attachment tab that is past the stitching, thus not load bearing. Then even if the marker did damage the material (which it doesent), it wouldent really matter since the portion of the tab you're marking is not load bearing.

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Unfortunately, it's not that simple because I'm not the only one who has to make the decision (to be precise: this is about me wanting to improve the way our students learn packing, but I'm not the head honcho in charge of our clubs equipment).

So with the restriction that no markers can be used anywhere, even on non-loadbearing parts, what are other ways to more easily differentiate lines into the different linegroups are possible?

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IJskonijn

Unfortunately, it's not that simple because I'm not the only one who has to make the decision (to be precise: this is about me wanting to improve the way our students learn packing, but I'm not the head honcho in charge of our clubs equipment).

So with the restriction that no markers can be used anywhere, even on non-loadbearing parts, what are other ways to more easily differentiate lines into the different linegroups are possible?




Teaching

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pnuwin

Brightly colored cotton sewing thread tied to the line or attachment points. Or just buy an Aerodyne canopy.

use nylon instead. Cotton will break easily.

You could wrap some thick, colored nylon thread through the line attachment points a few times and then tie it back to itself. That would probably work.

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IJskonijn

So with the restriction that no markers can be used anywhere, even on non-loadbearing parts, what are other ways to more easily differentiate lines into the different linegroups are possible?



Simple. The length of the line is the single easiest way to identify a line group. A's being the shortest to D's being the longest. Colours are irrelevant.

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ChrisHoward

***So with the restriction that no markers can be used anywhere, even on non-loadbearing parts, what are other ways to more easily differentiate lines into the different linegroups are possible?



Simple. The length of the line is the single easiest way to identify a line group. A's being the shortest to D's being the longest. Colours are irrelevant.

^This.

If you want to do something more obvious for a class, or for practice packing, threads or yarn tied around the attachment points would work.
If it was me, I'd only do one side. Have them flake the 'tagged' side, then go over and flake the 'untagged' side. Do that a few times and they should be able to see the groups without needing the tags.

But I will agree that tagging each line group isn't needed. Just have them look at the knots. Presuming a 9 cell, there should be 4 groups of 4 knots at different heights.
Those are your line groups.
"There are NO situations which do not call for a French Maid outfit." Lucky McSwervy

"~ya don't GET old by being weak & stupid!" - Airtwardo

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Or just use one of Aerodynes canopies for learning if you have some around the dz. I agree on line length learning technique though, it is harder at the beginning but it will save the students the doubtful double checking after they buy their own canopies with all white tabs.

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Maddingo

Or just use one of Aerodynes canopies for learning if you have some around the dz. I agree on line length learning technique though, it is harder at the beginning but it will save the students the doubtful double checking after they buy their own canopies with all white tabs.



My first canopy was a Pilot. I just replaced it with a Sabre2 and had a moment of worry that I would have a harder time sorting lines. None whatsoever. Everything lined up and fell in place naturally. The colored packing tabs really helped when I started packing after struggling with the student canopies where the lines looked like a bowl of spaghetti to a noob.

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Height of the lines is something we use already, but is not foolproof (for example, the steering lines with toggles set are about the same length as the C-lines).

I might prefer using cotton instead of nylon. The marking thread won't have any load-bearing function, and I would rather that it brakes if it somehow does come under tension.

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