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rinaldi524

Ted Strong D-16

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I've been thinking about Ted every day since I heard about his passing.

My heart and prayers are with his family and everyone at the factory.

Ted Strong was a lot of things, he was an extraordinary skydiver, he was an extraordinary innovator and designer, and he was a visionary in our sport who spent over fifty years of his life pursuing a safer sport for us all. But his greatest attribute, what drew people to him, was that at his core, he was simply an extraordinary human being.

For those that knew Ted, they understood that it was his integrity and his principles that defined him.

On a personal level, he changed my life forever when he asked me to come down to Orlando in 2006 and work for him at Strong Enterprises. I wanted to say yes, but I was reluctant at first, apprehensive about leaving my comfortable career and expressed my concern to him.

Like it was yesterday, I remember walking around Lake Wales with him discussing this idea and my concerns, when he stopped, turn to me, and said "Let me ask you a question". "Okay" I replied, "Shoot." And then he asked me the question that basically changed my life forever:

"Do you look forward to Fridays, you know when your work week ends and your weekend starts?"

"Yes" I replied, "Doesn't everybody?"

"No" he replied. "Not me. I look forward to Mondays, the same way you look forward to Fridays."

"Why is that?" I asked.

"Because I love my job. Come work for me, and you will look forward to Mondays, the same way the rest of the world looks forward to the weekends."

It was the most profound statement I had ever heard at 32 years old, and that was all it took. And you know what, he was right.

I am really going to miss Ted. He was a mentor, a motivator and a role model to so many of us.

I am grateful that I was able to share in his extraordinary life.
Namaste,
Tom Noonan

www.everest-skydive.com

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Ted’s wife Marcie, his two children, and eight grandchildren, as well as his extended family (the Strong Enterprises employees) would like to thank everyone for the many kind words, cards, arrangements and support shown during the past two weeks. Ted was larger than life not only within Strong Enterprises but throughout the industry worldwide. His ideas, expertise, and smile will be greatly missed but never forgotten.

The company that he created and loved is here to stay and will continue to make him proud! We’re working on finishing current projects including:

• The New Tandem System which is in the TSO process
• The TSO of our 30ft. round reserve for pilot emergency use
• Finalizing the Icarus canopy approval
• A newly designed website with exciting new features
• Continuing to improve the Dual Hawk Tandem System

All while constantly creating new and innovative products living up to the name "The parachute company with imagination"

Due to the amount of people who have expressed interest in attending services we are currently planning on holding a celebration of Ted’s life around the time of the “Skydive Expo” which is scheduled April 3-8th, 2012. This gives people from around the world time to make arrangements and also gives the added benefit of attending the Expo. This is also a perfect time to celebrate Ted’s life since April 5th is the anniversary of his first jump in 1958 and April 7th his birthday.

We always look forward to hearing from everyone. Thank You!

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You know sometimes, in the rarest of circumstances, an individual is as beautiful in death as they were in life. Ted Strong clearly, is one of those giants. The words, feelings and love demonstrated in this mail and so many that preceded it, show what a positive influence this man had on so many others. I did not know him, but when I saw him at Oshkosh one year I made certain to shake his hand and say hello. I’m so glad I did. As a Rigger, I'll look forward to the release of that 30 foot round reserve pilot rig.

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Very nice Tom, tells a lot about both Ted and you.


~Quick story that maybe it's time to share:

A few years ago I was jumping an airshow in northern California.

At the end of the performer briefing Saturday morning, an older very tall and distinguished looking gentleman who was flying in the show approached me and introduced himself.

He called me by name & pointed to the Strong Enterprise patch on my jumpsuit and asked if I knew Ted personally, I of course acknowledged in the affirmative.

The ole gent in the nomex flight-suit shook my hand again and invited me to take a seat saying...

"Have I got a story for you"


According to this fellow, it seems quite possible that some of the original 'history' of US skydiving may be somewhat in error.

He'd reminded of a jump I'd made several years earlier commemorating the 40th anniversary of the first US baton pass with the surviving participant, we did it at Oshkosh and it was a rather special event to be a part of...

This air show pilot told me how he'd watched that show during Oshkosh years before with a bit of a snicker, and had been waiting for the day our paths would cross.


He told me how 'way back in the day', though other countries had done the baton pass, it hadn't been achieved yet in the states...that is until he and his room mate tried it a few times then figured out the whole 'RW' fly to each other thing!

His roomie was of course Ted Strong! :o

He then went on to tell me that their 'plan' was to show a couple of other rather famous Skydivers how it's done...and then let them do the 'First Official' US baton pass as a publicity thing to help with the new parachute training school they were setting up.

He said how poetic would it have been for D1 & D2 to 'take the stick' and run with it.

However a couple of other jumpers that we all know & love ended up performing the pass before the 'plan' could come about...and they, knowing nothing of any other attempts either successful or not, took the honor.

And history was thus written.



I asked the old guy 'if' that's true, how come no one has ever made mention of it before...you know, disputed the claim, took proper credit, made a big deal out of it?!

He gave me a wink replying simply, "I thought you said you knew Ted!" B|





Well...I couldn't get that story out of my mind, and when I ran into Ted at PIA I just had to ask him.

With the standard huge Ted Strong grin he said to me, "Jim there are only two guys still around that know if there's any truth to that 'story'...you heard from one, and you're looking at the other." :ph34r:

D-16 then gave me the exact same wink I'd seen months earlier out in California...and smiling to himself, turned and walked away! :)B|:D:D










~ If you choke a Smurf, what color does it turn? ~

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Very nice Tom, tells a lot about both Ted and you.


~Quick story that maybe it's time to share:

A few years ago I was jumping an airshow in northern California.

At the end of the performer briefing Saturday morning, an older very tall and distinguished looking gentleman who was flying in the show approached me and introduced himself.

He called me by name & pointed to the Strong Enterprise patch on my jumpsuit and asked if I knew Ted personally, I of course acknowledged in the affirmative.

The ole gent in the nomex flight-suit shook my hand again and invited me to take a seat saying...

"Have I got a story for you"


According to this fellow, it seems quite possible that some of the original 'history' of US skydiving may be somewhat in error.

He'd reminded of a jump I'd made several years earlier commemorating the 40th anniversary of the first US baton pass with the surviving participant, we did it at Oshkosh and it was a rather special event to be a part of...

This air show pilot told me how he'd watched that show during Oshkosh years before with a bit of a snicker, and had been waiting for the day our paths would cross.


He told me how 'way back in the day', though other countries had done the baton pass, it hadn't been achieved yet in the states...that is until he and his room mate tried it a few times then figured out the whole 'RW' fly to each other thing!

His roomie was of course Ted Strong! :o

He then went on to tell me that their 'plan' was to show a couple of other rather famous Skydivers how it's done...and then let them do the 'First Official' US baton pass as a publicity thing to help with the new parachute training school they were setting up.

He said how poetic would it have been for D1 & D2 to 'take the stick' and run with it.

However a couple of other jumpers that we all know & love ended up performing the pass before the 'plan' could come about...and they, knowing nothing of any other attempts either successful or not, took the honor.

And history was thus written.



I asked the old guy 'if' that's true, how come no one has ever made mention of it before...you know, disputed the claim, took proper credit, made a big deal out of it?!

He gave me a wink replying simply, "I thought you said you knew Ted!" B|





Well...I couldn't get that story out of my mind, and when I ran into Ted at PIA I just had to ask him.

With the standard huge Ted Strong grin he said to me, "Jim there are only two guys still around that know if there's any truth to that 'story'...you heard from one, and you're looking at the other." :ph34r:

D-16 then gave me the exact same wink I'd seen months earlier out in California...and smiling to himself, turned and walked away! :)B|:D:D



Jim,
I'd heard that story from Bill M, and when I asked Ted to tell the whole story, he asked us to shut the camera off, saying that history was written and he didn't want anyone to think otherwise. He referred to it in the PIA interview after prompted, but he wouldn't say much. I wonder what else Ted isn't known for?

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Very nice Tom, tells a lot about both Ted and you.


~Quick story that maybe it's time to share:

A few years ago I was jumping an airshow in northern California.

At the end of the performer briefing Saturday morning, an older very tall and distinguished looking gentleman who was flying in the show approached me and introduced himself.

He called me by name & pointed to the Strong Enterprise patch on my jumpsuit and asked if I knew Ted personally, I of course acknowledged in the affirmative.

The ole gent in the nomex flight-suit shook my hand again and invited me to take a seat saying...

"Have I got a story for you"


According to this fellow, it seems quite possible that some of the original 'history' of US skydiving may be somewhat in error.

He'd reminded of a jump I'd made several years earlier commemorating the 40th anniversary of the first US baton pass with the surviving participant, we did it at Oshkosh and it was a rather special event to be a part of...

This air show pilot told me how he'd watched that show during Oshkosh years before with a bit of a snicker, and had been waiting for the day our paths would cross.


He told me how 'way back in the day', though other countries had done the baton pass, it hadn't been achieved yet in the states...that is until he and his room mate tried it a few times then figured out the whole 'RW' fly to each other thing!

His roomie was of course Ted Strong! :o

He then went on to tell me that their 'plan' was to show a couple of other rather famous Skydivers how it's done...and then let them do the 'First Official' US baton pass as a publicity thing to help with the new parachute training school they were setting up.

He said how poetic would it have been for D1 & D2 to 'take the stick' and run with it.

However a couple of other jumpers that we all know & love ended up performing the pass before the 'plan' could come about...and they, knowing nothing of any other attempts either successful or not, took the honor.

And history was thus written.



I asked the old guy 'if' that's true, how come no one has ever made mention of it before...you know, disputed the claim, took proper credit, made a big deal out of it?!

He gave me a wink replying simply, "I thought you said you knew Ted!" B|





Well...I couldn't get that story out of my mind, and when I ran into Ted at PIA I just had to ask him.

With the standard huge Ted Strong grin he said to me, "Jim there are only two guys still around that know if there's any truth to that 'story'...you heard from one, and you're looking at the other." :ph34r:

D-16 then gave me the exact same wink I'd seen months earlier out in California...and smiling to himself, turned and walked away! :)B|:D:D



Well, that is a new one for me. Thanks for sharing it Twardo.
Look for the shiny things of God revealed by the Holy Spirit. They only last for an instant but it is a Holy Instant. Let your soul absorb them.

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Hi

Part of Teds legacy: excerpt from

http://www.stripes.com/news/roadside-bombs-lead-to-more-precision-parachute-airdrops-1.161135

"The Air Force also is ramping up its use of a system that links global positioning satellites to small motors that steer supply parachutes down to ground troops, Rooney said. The GPS-guided parachutes have worked so well that the Air Force plans to increase their use from 100 airdrops in the past year to 40 per month, he said.

The “Joint Precision Air Drop System” enables a navigator, equipped with a laptop to enter data such as the coordinates of the drop zone, wind speed and direction. The system then tells the navigator where to release the load, Rooney said.

The system’s motors control parachutes in the same way that skydivers pull cords to guide their canopies into the drop zone, he said.

Engineers’ goal was to land satellite-guided parachutes inside a 150-meter diameter circle but the system works so well that 80 percent of loads drop in an 80-meter circle and 100 percent fall within a 100-meter circle, Rooney said.

The satellite-guided system allows cargo aircraft to fly as high as 25,000 feet where wind would normally be a major factor. The altitude puts them beyond the range of Afghan insurgents who frequently take pot shots at low flying planes, he said.

It also allows supplies to be “flown” to a drop zone from a release point up to 16 miles away, he said.

“They can fly [the GPS-guided parachute] over a ridge line, down a valley and into a forward operating base,” he said. “They can do a single pass over a valley and resupply two bases.”

The systems, which cost $20,000 each, carry up to 2,200 pounds of cargo. If troops are in a hurry they only need to unclip an 8-pound avionics unit to have recovered half the system’s value, Rooney said. “This is also a game changer for users (such as Special Operations personnel) who jump in with their supplies,” he said. “They can now be confident that their supplies we will be at the intended point on the ground when they land rather than having to hunt them down.”

Capt. Jeremy Hague, 28, of Pittsburgh, a navigator with the 36th Airlift Squadron out of Yokota Air Base, Japan, said a big advantage of the GPS-guided parachute is its ability to hit a target in poor visibility.

“We can drop it above the clouds and it will steer itself to the impact point,” he said."

Thank you Mr Strong:)

K-RIP

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I find it very strange that a person with the magnitude of ted strong seems to get lost in these forums so easily and that so few skydivers contribute to this thread :|
The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle

dudeist skydiver # 666

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I find it very strange that a person with the magnitude of ted strong seems to get lost in these forums so easily and that so few skydivers contribute to this thread :|



There are 87 posts to this thread, now 88. As far as me, I never met the man so I have nothing to add to the list of condolences.
"For you see, an airplane is an airplane. A landing area is a landing area. But a dropzone... a dropzone is the people."

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I was lucky enough to meet Ted quickly at PIA, and lucky enough to witness all the displays of love for Ted from all around at this year's Skydive Expo in Deland.
I took a quick picture of what I thought might be one of the most simple, yet very efficient tributes. :):)
scissors beat paper, paper beat rock, rock beat wingsuit - KarlM

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It's a funny comment on that picture for sure but it should be said that the Ted I knew respected women, all women. His Wife Marcie told me "Ted loved women, revered in fact, women, like so few men whom are free of guilt and weird commitments are willing to do". So yes I believe Ted may have laughed a little if he read the comment on the photo but then he would have took it down and put it in his pocket, as so not to offend.

We all miss you Ted but a piece of you remains in all of us!

Mike Rinaldi

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