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SkymonkeyONE

Blue Skies, Black Death (Roger Nelson)

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Everyone --

At the request of some folks from SDC, I've deleted the name of the other jumper involved. After it is published in the news they feel it will be all right, but they feel it's inappropriate at this time.

As always, please keep speculation to a minimum.
quade -
The World's Most Boring Skydiver

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This is piece by cummings that I read when life and its events are simply baffling. Sincerest condolences to friends and family. Lets have a safe Sunday.

-Jon


life is more true than reason will deceive
(more secret or than madness did reveal)
deeper is life than lose: higher than have
--but beauty is more each than living's all

multiplied with infinity sans if the mightiest meditation of mankind
cancelled are by one merely opening her leaf
(beyond whose nearness there is no beyond)

or does some littler bird than eyes can learn
look up to silence and completely sing?
futures are obsolete;pasts are unborn
(here less than nothing's more than everything)

death,as men call him,ends what they call men
--but beauty is more now than dying's when

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This is the worst part of this sport.

I've been at my computer, sending text messages and on the cell talking to folks ever since I first heard this earlier today.

Like most skydivers, I've heard lots of stories about Roger over the years. Some were pretty wild, some were pretty strange and all of them told me that above all he loved the sport and would do whatever it took for him and his teams to do well in it. Clearly he had a passion for skydiving and the ability to make things happen -- a powerful combination that breeds success. He was a leader of people and had a very loyal following.

I only met him once -- 2002 Nationals at SDC. I wished I had known him better.

My heart goes out to his family, friends and skydivers everywhere that will suffer this loss.
quade -
The World's Most Boring Skydiver

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Although I'm two years out of currency, I had always followed--and admired--the exploits of Roger Nelson. I trained at a competing DZ, but secretly admired him and his larger-than-life exploits.

I am truly bummed. BS BD, Roger. I hope to jump with your talented offspring someday.

Peace and Light :(

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There are individuals who just visit skydiving and then there are those special individuals who live it and make us want to live it too...
I am happy I had the chance to meet Roger.
Our prayers and thoughts are with his family and loved ones

The Garcias



LIFE IS LIKE A CIGARETTE, YOU CAN SIT THERE AND WATCH IT BURN AWAY OR YOU CAN SMOKE THAT BITCH TO THE FILTER

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Roger's brought a lot to skydiving. A whole lot. I'm sorry he's gone, and I'm glad he was here.

Wendy W.



As always you say it perfectly Wendy. I didnt know him but i sure have eard of him and his innovations in training etc. He has had a huge influence on the sport, and im sorry hes gone too.
Sincere condolences to his family.

Zhai 'helleva Roger, Wind to thy wings,
Genie

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I was at Elsinore, celebrating a 50th birthday with skydiving friends, when I got the message of Roger's passing. The talk soon turned to memories of Roger and his life.

As these people I was with have been long in the sport, the stories ran deep. Some of us only knew the surface, but this man had many sides. Many accomplishments. And many exploits. A colorful man indeed. A man who lead, and if you wanted to keep pace, you followed...

My heart goes out to Rook and Missy. Nothing can take away their pain, but surrounding love from friends can ease it.

ltdiver

Don't tell me the sky's the limit when there are footprints on the moon

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He recovered to level flight and was quiet for a time before he spoke. "Very well," he said, "who are you?"

"We're from your Flock, Jonathan. We are your brothers." The words were strong and calm. "We've come to take you higher, to take you home."

"Home I have none. Flock I have none. I am Outcast, and we fly now at the peak of the Great Mountain Wind. Beyond a few hundred feet, I can lift this old body no higher."

"But you can, Jonathan. For you have learned. One school is finished, and the time has come for another to begin."

As it had shined across him all his life, so understanding lighted that moment for Jonathan Seagull. They were right. He could fly higher, and it was time to go home.

He gave one last long look across the sky, across that magnificent silver land where he had learned so much.

"I'm ready," he said at last.

And Jonathan Livingston Seagull rose with the two starbright gulls to disappear into a perfect dark sky.

-Richard Bach

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I am utterly stunned, shocked, and saddened by this news. This is a huge loss to our skydiving family. He is a true pioneer of our sport. I first met Roger at Summerfest '01 and saw how his attitude was infused through everyone that jumped there. I have had some of the best times of my life at SDC. I've read every weekly update he's written since then, jumped with him, jumped his plane, learned so much from him, from Rook, from Missy. I was really glad the whole community came to SDC for Nationals saw firsthand how this man took an Illinois cornfield and build it into an incredible community of good vibes and good jumping.
I am alive today because of what I learned from Roger. I have never met anyone with as great a passion for this sport and love for his fellow skydivers, as Roger Nelson. He will be greatly missed.

BSBD

Trevor

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'You will ask... "what is the use of climbing Mount Everest?" and my answer must at once be, "it is no use"... if you cannot understand that there is something in man which responds to the challenge of this mountain and goes out to meet it, that the struggle is the struggle of life itself, upward and forever upward, then you won't see why we go.'

George Mallory, 1922



I posted this quote a while back, just seemed to kind of apply here. Regardless of what happened in his life, what others thought of him, he kept striving upwards. I never met the guy, just heard and read all the stories (good and bad). Facts are, he was a great innovator, an asset to skydiving and had a positive impact on many peoples' lives.

My thoughts are with his friends, family and the other jumper.

BSBD

Will

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I cannot believe it.
I went through the very first BIC Course during the P.I.A. in '97. He was there for the Regional Directors. Roger brought some very interesting vidoes to learn off of.

Roger is a Great Guy who was instrumental in trying to make the sport safer. I cannot believe that he is gone. :(

I am at a loss for words. I just :(

Blue Skies - Black Death!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Keith (KRAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAMER!!!!!)
D-19134
Strong TI
The REAL KRAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAMER!

"HESITATION CAUSES DEATH!!!"
"Be Slow to Fall into Friendship; but when Thou Art in, Continue Firm & Constant." - SOCRATES

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Skydive Chicago owner dies in jump

Collision in air: One of at least 14 deaths at Ottawa company
COPLEY NEWS SERVICE

OTTAWA — As fatalities mounted at Skydive Chicago, owner Roger Nelson said it was reckless skydivers, not his Ottawa-based skydiving business, that were to blame.

"I'm doing everything I can," Nelson said last year. "This whole place is careful, to where we're not tolerating any unsafe behavior."

About 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Nelson, 48, who had previously made more than 9,000 jumps safely, made his last. He was about 50 feet above the ground when another skydiver collided with Nelson's parachute, and the canopy collapsed, according to the LaSalle County Sheriff's Department.

Nelson was taken to OSF Saint Francis Medical Center in Peoria by helicopter, where he was pronounced dead at 5:27 p.m.

The other skydiver, Todd Fey, 43, of North Dakota, was taken to Ottawa Community Hospital, where he was being treated in the emergency room Saturday night. His condition was not immediately available.

"Skydiving is a very unforgiving sport if something goes wrong," said LaSalle County Coroner Jody Bernard. "That could happen to anyone even if they had a lot of experience. Obviously I've been out there a number of times, and I have not seen any blatant disregard for safety."

Including Nelson's death, there have been at least 14 deaths at Skydive Chicago since 1993, when the facility opened. Ten of those deaths have been in the past five years.

Those numbers spurred LaSalle County State's Attorney Joe Hettel to investigate in 2001, but he concluded there was nothing he could do.

"If someone wants to jump out of an airplane, there's not much we can do about it," Hettel said last year.

According to the U.S. Parachute Association, there are 3 million jumps and 30 skydiving deaths a year in America, making the overall risk of death about 1 in 111,000. Skydive Chicago had about 75,000 jumps a year.

The deaths at Skydive Chicago included Ronald Passmore Jr., 33, of Butler, Ind., who died last July 14 while attempting to skim over a pond while landing; and skydiving instructor John T. Faulkner, 28, of Ottawa, who died in May 2002 when his parachute failed to open.

Bruce Greig, 38, of Jacksonville died on Oct. 14, 2001, when his chute malfunctioned. Steven Smith, 44, of Ohio, Ill., and Deborah Luhmann, 27, of rural Ottawa died on Oct. 6, 2001, when their parachutes became entangled during a group exercise with 20 jumpers.

The skydivers jump from about 13,000 feet with each dive lasting about 60 seconds in freefall and five to seven minutes gliding to earth if everything goes OK. The average human body falls at about 120 mph, according to Skydive Chicago's Web site.

Nelson said last year that the 10 jumpers who died since 1998 were "all people with their own parachutes pushing the envelope either in their skill level or the risk they chose to put themselves in to attempt a stunt.

"And I'm sorry to say that it's real possible someone could die here again. That's what I'm afraid of."

At Skydive Chicago, a woman answered the phone Saturday night.

"Skydive Chicago," she said. "Are you calling about your first jump?"

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At Skydive Chicago, a woman answered the phone Saturday night.

"Skydive Chicago," she said. "Are you calling about your first jump?"



Not wishing to sound morbid, but that is what i would expect,
Life goes on. [:/]

-- Hope you don't die. --

I'm fucking winning

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