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rushmc

There IS a problem with global warming... it stopped in 1998

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21 hours ago, kallend said:

Dam collapse floods central Michigan following record rainfalls.

During the past several decades, spring rainfall in Michigan has been on the increase, likely tied to warming temperatures and the air’s ability to hold additional moisture. Data point to a roughly 25 percent increase in March through May rainfall since 1970 in Midland, with similar trends observed areawide. Mean springtime precipitation in Gladwin has leapt from 7.1 inches in 1940 to nearly 9.3 inches nowadays. Spring temperatures have warmed a degree and a half there during that same time frame.

According to the U.S. government’s National Climate Assessment, the heaviest precipitation events in the Midwest have increased by 42 percent since 1958.

The last four years, 2016 through 2019, were all ranked among Michigan’s top 15 wettest on record, and five of the top 10 wettest years have come in the last decade.

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2020/05/20/michigan-dams-fail-midland/

https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/2012/11/20/warming-lakes-climate-change-and-variability-drive-low-water-levels-on-the-great-lakes/

Climate change is blamed for low water levels, until it is blamed for high water levels.  IN THE SAME AREA!

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19 minutes ago, brenthutch said:

https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/2012/11/20/warming-lakes-climate-change-and-variability-drive-low-water-levels-on-the-great-lakes/

Climate change is blamed for low water levels, until it is blamed for high water levels.  IN THE SAME AREA!

OMG.  RAINED YESTERDAY, NO RAIN TODAY BUT NOW THEY SAY IT'S GOING TO RAIN AGAIN.  THEY NEED TO MAKE UP THEIR MIND!!!

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On 5/5/2020 at 9:43 AM, brenthutch said:

That said, replacing a lifeless bulldozer of ice with a beautiful alpine meadow is ok in my book

Right on Brent! And while we're at it let's empty the books from all libraries because we can use more hand ball courts. 

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(edited)
23 hours ago, JoeWeber said:

Have you ever wondered, you know with you being so all knowing and right about everything, why your last job was tossing drogues at a now dead DZ? 

It closed because I left, I didn’t leave because it closed.  I missed too many football and baseball games and missed to many Jujitsu tournaments.  When my actual kids required more attention than my DZ kids, I did what any good father would do.

Edited by brenthutch
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5 hours ago, turtlespeed said:

. . . and this one will be kinda hard to explain, if global warming stopped.

Is a record temp and a record upward temperature pattern just weather?

https://www.axios.com/arctic-circle-temperatures-siberia-2effdad5-3b80-4454-8cfb-c167e96ca7e8.html

If you don't measure the temperature then there's no warming.  Duh.

 

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By Paul Bodnar and Tamara Grbusic, Rocky Mountain Institute.

In response to climate-related disasters in 2017 Congress appropriated $136 billion in additional funding for recovery — amounting to about $1,000 for every American taxpayer.

The government faces wide exposure, including repairing damage to federal property and lands, federal insurance for property and crops, the cost of making public infrastructure resilient to climate impacts, and disaster aid (including relocation of entire populations in harm’s way of persistent climate repercussions like sea level rise).

Fourteen billion-dollar weather and climate calamities struck last year, the fifth year in a row with 10 or more. And projections don’t look good.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration estimates that the average annual number of disasters causing over $1 billion in damages over the past five years was double the average over the past four decades. The agency warned last year, “The number and cost of disasters are increasing over time due to a combination of increased exposure, vulnerability, and the fact that climate change is increasing the frequency of some types of extremes that lead to billion-dollar disasters.”

Overall, according to the government’s national climate assessment in 2018, continued warming “is expected to cause substantial net damage to the U.S. economy throughout this century, especially in the absence of increased adaptation efforts.”

etc........

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June had the fewest tornadoes in 70 years and we are more than 25% through hurricane season and still no hurricanes.  BTW the world is projected to set another record for global food production.  All of this in the middle of a “CLIMATE APOCALYPSE” 
LOL

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(edited)
3 hours ago, brenthutch said:

... BTW the world is projected to set another record for global food production.  All of this in the middle of a “CLIMATE APOCALYPSE” 
LOL

Proof please. You and Turtle are infamous for making representations without proof.Furthermore flooding causes more damages than tornadoes.

Edited by Phil1111

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13 hours ago, Phil1111 said:

Proof please. You and Turtle are infamous for making representations without proof.Furthermore flooding causes more damages than tornadoes.

FAO Cereal Supply and Demand Brief

The Cereal Supply and Demand Brief provides an up-to-date perspective of the world cereal market. The monthly brief is supplemented by a detailed assessment of cereal production as well as supply and demand conditions by country/region in the quarterly Crop Prospects and Food Situation. More in-depth analyses of world markets for cereals, as well as other major food commodities, are published biannually in Food Outlook.

Monthly release dates for 2020: 6 February, 5 March, 2 April, 7 May, 4 June, 2 July, 3 September, 8 October, 5 November, 3 December.

Record global cereal production forecast boosts stock-to-use ratio to a twenty-year high 

Release date: 02/07/2020

home-graph_4_jul.jpgFAO’s forecast for world cereal production in 2020 has been revised upward by 9.3 million tonnes this month and now stands at almost 2 790 million tonnes, with the global output set to surpass the record-high reached in 2019 by as much 3.0 percent (81.3 million tonnes). Global wheat production is pegged at 761.5 million tonnes, up 3.2 million tonnes from the previous month and now at par with last year’s above-average outturn. The bulk of the monthly increase reflects an upward revision to Australia’s wheat production forecast (+5.5 million tonnes), mostly resting on improved yield prospects underpinned by earlier widespread rainfall and favourable weather forecasts for the remainder of the season. This, combined with a larger than initially foreseen wheat acreage, is expected to lead to a more pronounced production rebound in 2020, which would mark a significant turnaroun...

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32 minutes ago, brenthutch said:

FAO Cereal Supply and Demand Brief

The Cereal Supply and Demand Brief provides an up-to-date perspective of the world cereal market. The monthly brief is supplemented by a detailed assessment of cereal production as well as supply and demand conditions by country/region in the quarterly Crop Prospects and Food Situation. More in-depth analyses of world markets for cereals, as well as other major food commodities, are published biannually in Food Outlook.

Monthly release dates for 2020: 6 February, 5 March, 2 April, 7 May, 4 June, 2 July, 3 September, 8 October, 5 November, 3 December.

Record global cereal production forecast boosts stock-to-use ratio to a twenty-year high 

 

30 minutes ago, brenthutch said:

OK thanks for that. But you're not a stupid person so I can only conclude you're back to you're old habit of cherry picking data.As your story says this is cereal production. A small segment of world food supply and that increase is due to increased acreage and what appears to be an Australian bumper crop.

Increased seeded acreage means lessor acres to oil-seeds and other crops.

Global food markets still brace for uncertainty in 2020/21 because of COVID-19 says FAO

It appears that the impact of covid is having a greater impact than weather this year.

07 May 2020, Rome - World food commodity prices declined for the third month in a row during April, as the economic and logistical impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in significant contractions in demand for many commodities.

The FAO Food Price Index, which tracks international prices of the most commonly-traded food commodities, averaged 165.5 points in April, some 3.4 percent lower than the previous month and 3 percent lower than April 2019.

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2 hours ago, Phil1111 said:

 

OK thanks for that. But you're not a stupid person so I can only conclude you're back to you're old habit of cherry picking data.As your story says this is cereal production. A small segment of world food supply

“Cereals are still by far the world's most important sources of food, both for direct human consumption and indirectly, as inputs to livestock production.”
 

Small segment?

 

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(edited)
1 hour ago, brenthutch said:

Just the fact that your only angles are food production right now in this year and digs at Al Gore shows a lack of depth.  I have no idea what Al Gore is up to or was up to, I find him to be an opportunist for his personal agenda and at best a spokesman who only vaguely understands his own material.  You did a better job with "gotchas" when you were talking about melting glaciers.  Care to rehash that or maybe talk about ice volume in the Arctic Circle again?

Edited by DJL

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(edited)
8 minutes ago, brenthutch said:

"Scientists have relatively low confidence in detecting a link between tornado activity and climate change. They cannot exclude the possibility of a link; rather, the science is so uncertain that they simply do not know at this point."

The story you quote starts off with two big lies.

"In two articles published this past week here at Climate Realism, we showed how Al Gore’s predictions about melting glaciers in Glacier National Park and disappearing snows at Mt. Kilimanjaro have proven spectacularly wrong."

Retreat of Glaciers in Glacier National Park

I need a kick in the head for falling into the trap, again.

Edited by Phil1111

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