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Tigerfly

Help needed...Q's on used container

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Putting together my first used rig. This one fits my height/weight to a T. From what I've looked up on canopy sizes, it looks like this would fit a 170 main, which is what I'm looking for...waiting for an email back to confirm though. But, is there any problem with buying a 1993 container, if it's in good condition? I know I won't consider a canopy that old but does age of container matter? Also, it's set up for rsl, but no lanyard. How much would that cost approximately to get put on? I want an Rsl. What is a c-17 harness and a type 8 riser? Thanks! And if these are stupid questions, feel free to laugh. I'm 3 jumps from my license. Please school me. I have lots to learn. One more thing, CRW mod on reserve flap...means whaaaaat? :D thanks

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To begin with, that rig is ancient meaning it might be ok for belly jumps (and crw) but that's about it... If you plan on freeflying at all that container is not an option...

Type 8 risers means wide risers and big hardware (the same kind as in student gear), jumpable but not modern by any means.

RSL lanyard with installation is probaply less than hundred bucks if done during reserve repack, no biggie...

Biggest issue would be that the container is lacking AAD and I'm not even sure if you can mod it to have one since it is so old, all in all I wouldnt bother with anything that old unless it is free...

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CRW (Canopy Relative Work, also known as Canopy Formation) mod is the flap on the bottom reserve container flap that goes over the top reserve flap (the one protecting your pin). It is meant to prevent lines from catching under the top flap and exposing your reserve pin. It's nice to have if you are planning to do CRW, but otherwise has no use.

In general, I would not walk away just because of the age of the rig. If it is technically sound, fits properly and has all the bells & whistles you want (RSL and AAD for example), it should be perfectly good. Although as already mentioned, it is likely not suited for freeflying. That said, only a rigger is really able to tell if it is technically sound, so go find one and have a chat with him/her about this rig.

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Blis

To begin with, that rig is ancient meaning it might be ok for belly jumps (and crw) but that's about it... If you plan on freeflying at all that container is not an option...

Type 8 risers means wide risers and big hardware (the same kind as in student gear), jumpable but not modern by any means.

RSL lanyard with installation is probaply less than hundred bucks if done during reserve repack, no biggie...

Biggest issue would be that the container is lacking AAD and I'm not even sure if you can mod it to have one since it is so old, all in all I wouldnt bother with anything that old unless it is free...



You are partially right, but also horribly wrong ;(

Nothing wrong with T8 risers. Nothing. Many people still use them. It's simply a personal choice.
A 93 javelin is already AAD ready.

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Blis

To begin with, that rig is ancient meaning it might be ok for belly jumps (and crw) but that's about it... If you plan on freeflying at all that container is not an option...

Type 8 risers means wide risers and big hardware (the same kind as in student gear), jumpable but not modern by any means.

RSL lanyard with installation is probaply less than hundred bucks if done during reserve repack, no biggie...

Biggest issue would be that the container is lacking AAD and I'm not even sure if you can mod it to have one since it is so old, all in all I wouldnt bother with anything that old unless it is free...



Nothing obsolete about large rings and type 8 risers. Type 17 had issues for a long time and some still do. Type 17 fixed but still trickier to be right.

Any Javelin can be retrofitted for an aad if not anyway. Might let folks jumping in 1990's answer questions about the 1990's.
I'm old for my age.
Terry Urban
D-8631
FAA DPRE

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Judging by the photos, it looks like a lightly-used rig, but ask a local rigger to inspect it before any money changes hands.

If the container is already "RSL ready" it only takes the rigger an extra minute to install an RSL at repack time.

That Canopy Relative Work mod is a precursor to the tuck-in top flap found on more modern Javelins. It prevents snagging your reserve pin on another jumper's canopy or inside the airplane. Keep the CRW mod.

As for the question about: is it Cypres-ready? 1993 was around the time Cypres came into fashion, so it may or may not have Cypres pockets sewn in at the factory. Sewing Cypres pockets no big deal. I sewed Cypres pockets into hundreds of containers during the 1990s. In any case, ask your local rigger.

Type 8 risers and large (RW-1) 3-Rings may not be the heighth of this week's fashion, but they are stronger and more reliable than mini-risers. In any case, ask your local rigger to inspect the risers for wear-and-tear because main risers wear out after a thousand jumps. Fortunately, main risers are also easy to replace.

Finally, ask you local rigger how many jumps are left on the BOC, since they only last 300 or 400 jumps. While he is replacing the BOC, ask him to sew on a bridle cover (similar to current production). A bridle cover reduces the risk of pre-mature deployment while sit-flying.

Bottom line, as long as that Javelin passes your local rigger's inspection, it can easily be updated to almost the same standard as new Javelins.

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Blis

Type 8 risers means wide risers and big hardware (the same kind as in student gear), jumpable but not cool by any means.



Fixed that for you (I use Type 8 risers, so can confirm) :)
Quagmirian

Don't make me get Bill Booth in here.



If someone can get him in here, I'd be interested in hearing whether his thoughts on the following two topics have changed since 2004/2005:

Mini risers with large rings

Prefer riser failure as a way of avoiding excessive forces being transmitted to the jumper/harness

When I ordered a new pilot chute for my Vector a few weeks ago, I asked whether UPT can now manufacture mini risers with large rings. The answer is still 'no'.

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How do I reply to like everyone that helped me without hitting reply on my own posting? just curious...message boards confuse me.
ANYWAYS! ;) Thanks everyone for your help! I'm still keeping in mind this container..if the store emails me back with an answer on if if is AAD ready. In the meantime though, I believe I found a used rig with a main, reserve and aad that sounds like it should fit me and is what I'm looking for. Can I ask a couple questions unrelated to this container I originally posted about? Or make a new post? Well shoot, I will go for it.
1.) Rigger reports done at Perris were provided. Should I call to verify nothing was forged...or still pay a local rigger to have it inspected? If I pay a rigger to look over everything, what does that usually cost about?
2.)I have the serial numbers of the canopies. Is there a way to check if either of them have been recalled?

Thanks!

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1) Back when I rigged in Perris, I was brutally honest when inspecting second-hand parachutes. This sometimes put me at odds with Square One's salespeople, but I always put the lives of customers first. I hope today's rigger's work to the same standard. Most Southern California riggers are narrow-minded, anal-retentive, control-freak perfectionists. They work in a fiercely-competitive environment and compete on quality of workmanship.
Also remember that forging packing data cards is a federal crime, because it risks lives. Anyone forging a packing card risks losing their rigging license.

Your local rigger can spot 90 percent of defects with a quick (10 minute) external inspection ($10 to $20).
Judging by the photos, that Javelin looks lightly-used.

2) Yes! Share serial numbers and we will help you research Service Bulletins.
Hint: the Australian Parachute Federation maintains the best master-list of Airworthiness Directives, Product Updates, Service Bulletins, Special Inspections, etc.

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Some yes and some no.
Signatures are not mandatory for mere inspection reports. Any professional rigger will cheerfully sign an inspection report.

OTOH reserve packing data cards and rigger's' logbooks must contain the rigger's: license number, seal symbol and signature.

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