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Deadbird5

Can I rig a speedride/speedfly wing to a Skydive container?

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I'm new to skydiving, and obviously going to jump through the requisite training hoops on the way, but I'm trying to plot my progression course, as my end-game is speedriding, but I'll pass through the BASE community on my way.

Can I rig a speedride/speedfly wing to a skydive or BASE container? Is there a BASE/Skydive canopy suitable for speedfly? Or am I buying a Paraglide rig somewhere along the way?

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Technically - yes.
Practically, it's a terrible idea, and you'll damage laminated ribs and will rip off the lines within first 2-3 deployments.

That's assuming you mean to deploy from the said container. If you only want to just hook it up without actually packing into the rig, then it's an equally stupid idea, as you will be sitting weird, and won't have anywhere to stash the wing.

Basically, start with the horse, then add the cart to the back. Start each sport first, it'll be healthier (unless you die along the way).

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BASE is a distinctive sport off to the side of speed-flying and skydiving.

All three started with regular skydiving canopies and harnesses, but that was back in the days when your average skydiver jumped a 220 square foot, 7-cell. Nowadays, BASE canopies are still 7-cells but closer to 300 square feet and specialized for low-speed openings. These days few BASE jumpers load their canopies more than .7 pounds per square foot. Most BASE canopies can legally - and safely - be skydived out of airplanes as long as you pack them into a big student rig. You might need to add a sail slider to soften openings.

Speed-fliers and swooping skydivers evolved in the opposite direction with 9 or more cells, tapered platforms (elliptical), cross-bracing and lines trimmed for fast, steep, nose-down flight. Faster flight is also promoted by the much heavier wing-loading screen favoured by speed-fliers and canopy-swoopers ... as much as 4 pounds per square foot. Many skydiving canopies can be speed-flown, but will not last very long exposed to sunlight, cacti and thorn bushes.
Recently, speed-fliers have adopted more durable fabrics (e.g. Dacron sail cloth) that are too bulky to pack into most skydiving containers. Speed-flying canopies also have skinny lines that won't survive many terminal openings.

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Deimian

I have no idea about speedflying (even though I'd like to get at it one day), but isn't paragliding the most natural starting point for speedflyers? I always saw that if you wanted to speedfly you had to paraglide first, not skydive.



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Agreed.
There are two paths to speed-flying.
One path involves paying for hundreds of jumps from loud, noisy, smelly airplanes.
The other path starts at your friendly, neighbourhood para-gliding school. Once you have mastered the basics of launching docile school para-gliders, you can take advanced courses on progressively faster wings until you are speed-flying.
If my only goal was speed-flying, I would start at my local para-gliding school.

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