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lekstrom10k

F4u parachutes

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US Navy seat pack.
You can find pictures in Poynter's Manual.
Korean war vintage chutes were similar to World War 2 vintage seat packs, but made of nylon.
F4U pilots probably carried plenty of survival gear, so they sat on a 4 inch thick seat cushion in addition to the 4 inch thick parachute pack.
Modern replacements (for Warbirds) are made by Butler, Para-Phernalia and Strong. The biggest difference is that modern seat packs hide their risers and back straps under (Velcroed) covers, while Korean War vintage packs had a bewildering array of backstraps and risers flying in loose formation, held together by little straps and snaps and break cord. Strong advertises that they can exactly match colours, but their Pop-Top style was not was not invented until after the Korean War.

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I used to pack Army and Air Force seat packs for Danny Latchford's Midwest Parachute sales in Novi Michigan in 1974. All that riser to go under your butt . Then no steering other than riser tugging. I wouldnt wish that on anybody but it beat the alternative.I got a 1942 28 foot Navy all silk canopy cut steerable by Danny. One jump on it in 1974, I thought I was going to kiss my ankles on landing. Kind of like holding a chain up by one end then dropping it.I still have it. What color would the canopy be ? All white I presume.

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For pictures of US Navy seat packs, look at Poynter's Manual, Volume 1, pages 178 and 179.
During World War Two, most harnesses were made of brown cotton webbing. By the end of WW2, production shifted to sage green, nylon webbing.
Early seat containers were grey, with Korean War vintage production sage green.
In the front views, note the X-type (cross your heart) chest strap held together with a large hook. Both leg straps are also fastened with large hooks. Harnesses are shown in greater detail on page 319. The hooks are adjustable and show in detail on page 105.

Parachute canopies were 24 or 28 foot diameter, flat circular. Early production were natural silk (almost white), while late production was white nylon. They were non-steerable and ossicilated during descent.

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I heard a WW2 pilot talking about the canopy sizes recently. He pointed out that the 28 foot canopy was thicker, so it set you up higher in the cockpit. The smaller guys got those. The 24 foot canopy was smaller, so provided more headroom. The big guys got those.
You don't have to outrun the bear.

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I think I may actually have one. I'll pull it out tomorrow and take some pictures. From my logbook it's a Navy seat rig made by M. Steinthal & Co. manufactured in 1951. The canopy is a Pioneer C-9 made in 1953. When I first opened it up it had been packed since the early 60s and the rubber bands were perfect. I think I still have a few.

Can anyone verify or rule out that this was what he was asking about?


lekstrom10k

Could anyone post some pictures of the parachutes used in F4u Corsairs pilots for the Korean War. A friend is making a movie and would like to be accurate as possible.

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This might be what you are looking for.

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lekstrom10k

Could anyone post some pictures of the parachutes used in F4u Corsairs pilots for the Korean War. A friend is making a movie and would like to be accurate as possible.

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