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IHazySky

Should I use servo motors?

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I'm old school. I would go with old machines with standard clutch motors. Some of my machines have been running for more then 70 years and will still be running like a clock after I'm gone. I'm not sure I can say the same for some of these new fangled things. And the old school stuff can be less then half the cost of new machines. I've bought double needle heads for $100 Table legs new half speed motor for $250. Assemble. Beat that price on a brand new servo driven machine. Last harness I sold I charged the guy $500. You should be able to find one for $1000, $1500 tops. Look around for an old black singer.

Lee
Lee
lee@velocitysportswear.com
www.velocitysportswear.com

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Good points about servos:
* lightweight - cheaper shipping, easier handling, easier moving.
* no noise unless you're sewing
* no power use unless you're sewing.
* Infinitely adjustable speed - makes it easy to teach a newbie the basics of sewing, and easier on me to make everything work as I want.


I have 5 servos and 2 clutches in machines at my shop. They all work equally well in the end.

Chris

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I am able to get either motor for the same price. The issue is are they easier to control and adjust. Do they both have same, similar power?

I like the reduced power consumption, vibration idea as long as they have same punching power. Seems like a good idea to be able to dial speed up,or down depending on the project. I am not ultra experienced with industrial machines, and I know the clutch motors can be hard for me to control well. I also know I can get used to it.

I dunno what I am eventually gonna do. Hmmmm...

Found some refurbished heads, with new motors going on...

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Quote

I am able to get either motor for the same price. The issue is are they easier to control and adjust. Do they both have same, similar power?



Depends on the model. You'll want one that's 3/4 hp and has speed adjusting control. There are quite a few models out.

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... as long as they have same punching power.



I use a 3/4 hp servo on my Consew 339RB-3 for binding. It'll punch through binding + cordura + thick MDS stiffener as long as you keep it going. If I stop in the middle, and the needles are up against the MDS, then I have to help it get through an initial punch with the handwheel, then it goes on from there on its own. I'm not sure if a clutch would be different there.

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I dunno what I am eventually gonna do. Hmmmm...



For the harness machine a clutch will be the easiest solution. I have a servo on my 7-33, but I added a pulley reducer just to give it more torque. It works well, but it would have been cheaper and simpler just to use a clutch.

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Hi Ian,

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I added a pulley reducer



I would suggest doing this to any machine you buy & whatever motors you eventually get. And I think he probably means 'smaller pulley.'

Smaller pulleys will allow you to stitch at a slower speed until you get familiar & experienced with them.

I've put the smallest pulleys that I can on every machine that I own.

Jerry Baumchen

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I a word, yes. The only reason to use clutch motors would be because you learned to sew long enough ago that you are used to them. Or possibly in a factory where they are getting constant use. Power is really a non-issue, it's all about control. No one has problems sewing because their machine lacks power. Rather they have issues with machines designed to sew endless seams at 2000 stitches per minute when all they need to do is a small 6" repair to a flap or a to sew a patch. Traditionally sewing machines used clutch motors. Why? Because servo motors weren't available. Now they are.
Always remember the brave children who died defending your right to bear arms. Freedom is not free.

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I have both servo and clutch motors on my machines.

There are two common RPMs for clutch motors, around 1725+/- and 3450 +/-. If you go clutch, go 1725 RPM.

The small pulley will be 2"/50mm.

If you have a hard time controlling how hard you push the treadle and go full speed, add a piece of bungee from the table to the top of the treadle. This will give move feedback that you have to push through. I have also heard of putting a NERF football under the treadle so you have to push harder for full speed.

It doesn't take too long to learn how to feather the treadle for slow speed.
50 donations so far. Give it a try.

You know you want to spank it
Jump an Infinity

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I have a servo motor on my 20U at home (I requested a regular motor, but the dealer made a mistake and sent me the servo motor). I worried it wouldn't have enough power, but it's fine. I have it cranked almost all the way up though, and still just use my lightning quick reflexes for control ;)

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IHazySky

About to pull trigger on double needle and harness. Clutch motors? Servo for slow speed and control?
What r you guys using to power your machines.
I am thinking servo motors, but want everyone's feedback.
Thanks




I finally got tired of fighting with my machine. I bought a servo motor and put a smaller pulley on it. It was like a different machine. Perfectly well behaved and I can sew at much more reasonable speeds. I still sew through whatever I want but now I do it a little bit more in control.

Yesterday my 7 year old daughter spent her first half hour on it. She did fine. She'll be patching canopies in no time. Apparently though we are making a sleeping bag for her American Doll first.

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IHazySky

Ya. I got the servo motors with the small pulley. I was able to get them for the same price cause I just got two machines refurbished from same dealer. I can't wait till they get here. Thanks everyone for the opinions and input.



Every servo motor that I have seen had speed control. Which begs the question : Why does the pulley size matter ???

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likestojump

***Ya. I got the servo motors with the small pulley. I was able to get them for the same price cause I just got two machines refurbished from same dealer. I can't wait till they get here. Thanks everyone for the opinions and input.



Every servo motor that I have seen had speed control. Which begs the question : Why does the pulley size matter ???

Same reason some people put small countershaft sprockets on motorcycles: To get more raw power immediately. You still have 6 speeds on the bike, but your max speed will now be slower.

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parachutist



Same reason some people put small countershaft sprockets on motorcycles: To get more raw power immediately. You still have 6 speeds on the bike, but your max speed will now be slower.



Actually the main reason people usually put small countershaft sprockets on are because they are cheap. With a few exceptions I would almost always prefer to gear with the rear. A lot more expensive but much less stress on the front sprocket, swing-arm clearance issues, ect. Of course you need to go up about three depending on g/r to get the same and eventually can run into guide issues back there if you are trying to gear sport bikes for stunt riding which in that case longevity is a non issue. But for the most part I prefer to go up with the back. Now I have went up on the front when I used to have a natural MX track on the bottom of a frozen drained lake right in front of my house. Why? Because I was cheap and was basically destroying my bike anyway with massively hard landings. I still feel bad I sold some of those bikes for as much as I did.

Sorry for thread shift. Having a bad day waiting to get my son returned
That spot isn't bad at all, the winds were strong and that was the issue! It was just on the downwind side.

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craddock

***

Same reason some people put small countershaft sprockets on motorcycles: To get more raw power immediately. You still have 6 speeds on the bike, but your max speed will now be slower.



Actually the main reason people usually put small countershaft sprockets on are because they are cheap. With a few exceptions I would almost always prefer to gear with the rear. A lot more expensive but much less stress on the front sprocket, swing-arm clearance issues, ect. Of course you need to go up about three depending on g/r to get the same and eventually can run into guide issues back there if you are trying to gear sport bikes for stunt riding which in that case longevity is a non issue. But for the most part I prefer to go up with the back. Now I have went up on the front when I used to have a natural MX track on the bottom of a frozen drained lake right in front of my house. Why? Because I was cheap and was basically destroying my bike anyway with massively hard landings. I still feel bad I sold some of those bikes for as much as I did.

Sorry for thread shift. Having a bad day waiting to get my son returned

Your explanation fits riggers too. I'm cheap when I can be. It's much cheaper to buy a small pulley for the motor than it would be to purchase some large custom handwheel pulley for the machine :)

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craddock

With a few exceptions I would almost always prefer to gear with the rear. A lot more expensive but much less stress on the front sprocket, swing-arm clearance issues, ect.



So I'm sitting here picking stitches from a tandem main with a 3' long rip, and there's nothing else to do but mind wandering while picking this many stitches... and I realized this analogy of motorcycle sprockets fits the sewing machine very well, because: If you put a small pulley on the sewing machine motor, the surface area of the belt contacting the pulley has been reduced. So the belt slips at the motor more easily now. You can correct this slippage by tightening the belt, but that translates to more unwanted pressure on the machine head's shaft bearings.

To date it's been a fair balance for me between the two: I just tighten the belt. I haven't had any head damage as a result, but in principle it would be better to increase the upper pulley's size instead of decreasing the lower one. Maybe one day we'll have a CVT transmission box for these machines, so the pulley ratio automatically adjusts as needed. Anyway, back to seam ripping while daydreaming for me ;)

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parachutist



So I'm sitting here picking stitches from a tandem main with a 3' long rip, and there's nothing else to do but mind wandering while picking this many stitches... and I realized this analogy of motorcycle sprockets fits the sewing machine very well, because: If you put a small pulley on the sewing machine motor, the surface area of the belt contacting the pulley has been reduced. So the belt slips at the motor more easily now. You can correct this slippage by tightening the belt, but that translates to more unwanted pressure on the machine head's shaft bearings.

To date it's been a fair balance for me between the two: I just tighten the belt. I haven't had any head damage as a result, but in principle it would be better to increase the upper pulley's size instead of decreasing the lower one. Maybe one day we'll have a CVT transmission box for these machines, so the pulley ratio automatically adjusts as needed. Anyway, back to seam ripping while daydreaming for me ;)



LOL. Pulling stitches sounds like no fun right now. I am making my world famous Chili at the moment. I come to the gear and rigging forum mainly hoping for sewing threads. I am wanting to get into sewing Vinyl and Canvas for the marine and RV industry as well as make some personal use BASE containers as my skill increases. Looking for a 206rb or maybe even a sailrite to get started but funds are low. Funny when I search google on particular machines the dz.com forum is one of the few forum hits. The other is leatherworker.net. There does not seem to be a lot of recourses for an eager mind like mine. I just need to get a machine and see if I can figure it out and if it is for me.

Speaking of the analogy. On a motorcycle you only have so much adjustment and that adjustment affects handling for the more experienced/demanding riders. I have played with chain length/gearing to adjust my wheel base depending on the machine when I was competing at a high level and was particular.

Happy Stitch ripping. I need to go to the store and get a heavy porter or other beer to thin my Chili as I simmer it for hours
That spot isn't bad at all, the winds were strong and that was the issue! It was just on the downwind side.

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Funny that I just found this thread. Today I got a sewquiet 5000. Cheap chinese under $200 servo motor. Stuck it on my 20U without any real drama. It really is nice to sew now.

I do find on minimum speed you can feel the individual pulses from the servo motor but it has no impact on the sewing. I might spend some time hacking the controller for some more digital control - single stitch, or stopping in the down position every time...

-Michael

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