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Skydivesg

Closing pins piercing bridles - Total Malfunction

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Since we've gotten multiple emails about this topic today, I'll throw my response out here for any curious Infinity owners, with a little bit more information since I lost my train of thought while composing the email to those that inquired today:$

While it is OK to route the bridle from the bottom of an Infinity container, one should be careful to ONLY route the bridle under the #2 flap, and OVER the #1 flap. Tucking the bridle under the #1 flap could lower the security of the main pin cover flap and introduce premature wear.

What interests me is that until about 6 years ago, I had never heard of this malfunction happening. I believe it has become more prominent due to skydivers wanting every part of their gear “tight and tidy”, including the bridle under the pin cover flap- tucking it in so tight and orienting the pin in such a manner that the bridle can start moving before the pin does, giving the bridle an opportunity to impale itself on the pin.

Social media is also making it easier for people to share the information, possibly making a mountain out of the proverbial mole hill. I would hope that the free flow of information on the web is the main culprit here and that we're not actually regressing with our knowledge of knowing how to pack properly

Any routing/stowing of the bridle should be done so that any movement of the pilot chute end of the bridle results in either the pin extracting, or more slack in the bridle between the tip of the pin and where the bridle enters the main container.

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I am one of those people concerned that having both sides of the bridle coming from the bottom can reduce the security of the pin. I would worry a lot, except that most protective flaps now are very secure. If this was done on a rig with Velcro holding the flap closed, I would object.

Attached is a picture of my Talon 3 and my preferred bridle routing. I find it hard to believe that the pin could puncture the bridle.

Of course, the pin on this bridle is attached in a way that makes this routing easy. Some pins are mounted differently, and this may make some "clean" routings nearly impossible.

Also, note that the tip of the protective flap get inserted into the orange colored section above. This flap stays in place throughout the opening, which means that the bridle is pulling from the side, at least until the pin is extracted. (At least on this rig.) Some people think that the bridle is pulling from the same direction as the pilot chute is pulling from. On some rigs, maybe.

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JohnMitchell

Some time ago I reverted to old school and now bring my bridle up from the bottom, same way we did in the early 80's . Problem solved. ;)



I don't know how many times we have to have this discussion. Seriously. If you are jumping a wingsuit, you should be routing out the bottom and pinning upward as John just said. This applies to ALL containers, period. Trust me; I've been flying wingsuits since 1999 and have over 2900 flights. This not only prevents the bridle piercing problem; it also prevents pilot chute in tow problems (particularly on rigs with up-facing main pin flaps).

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I've replicated the problem on the ground. I did it by inserting the pin in such a way that the pin rotated 180° before extracting. It's rather common on tight pack jobs for jumpers to close the rig without regard to orientation. If the pin is inserted left to right, curved up, with a tight stiff pin protector flap; the tip of the pin goes into the bridle and the tension of PC inflation forces it through. It's hard to replicate when the pin protector is open so use your hand to keep the pin flat.
Old pin flaps weren't as rigid as today's which is why it's become a more common issue in recent years.

Another argument for "out the bottom" routing is the potential of increased pull force created by a tightly tucked bridle exiting the top. The Velcro some containers have above the pin to creates a secure slack to allow for movement but when the Velcro goes it winds up getting tucked in.
Exiting the bottom creates a secure slack by having the bridle double back on itself.
I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.

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