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Backintothesky

Modern SL Military Rigs

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Andy9o8

***I was wondering if it was that.

Seems a bit of an old fashion system for modern SL rigs no? Any ideas why they haven't converted to 3 ring release with cutaway handle - especially given a number of paratroopers will also be sport skydivers...



I'm presuming it's because the rigs used in most lower-altitude mass airborne drops use reserves that don't have pilot chutes, and are designed to be hand-deployed while the main remains attached, so they don't want a set-up that's too easily cut-away prior to landing. You don't want an airborne jumper who might jump below 1,000 feet under combat conditions to be jettisoning his main at 400 feet. Shot and a halfs were originally designed for post-landing usage, to jettison the canopy to prevent being dragged.

If I'm wrong, I'm sure someone will correct me right quick. ;)


100 percent right minus the reserve. The t11 is pilot chute assisted. ( and sensitive)Have you seen these as they don't look like the shot and a half I have seen before. Not that I'm a expert.
Propblast

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rigger 226

Rigger 226 knows what he is talking about and, if I remember right, in addition to the ejector spring, there is a small lead weight somewhere on? or in? the pilot chute that keeps the pilot chute going out when the ejector spring (I didn't know that it was called that) pushes out the pilot chute. Am I correct?

Anyway, I don't think any of the military chest reserves now are without pilot chutes. The days of a reserve w/o pilot chute, and requiring the soldier to throw the reserve in the direction of the spin = pretty sure those days are long gone.

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I was not in the US Army & have never been Airborne rated. However, every rig used for this application that I have seen in over the last 50 yrs have had a pilot chute in the reserve container. The early ones had what we called a 'spider' pilot chute. It used a multi-spring system that folded up somewhat like an umbrella. I never thought that goofy pilot chute could ever pass any testing standard; but it was good enough for those Airborne folks. And from the lowest bidder.


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I remember seeing that pilot chute. It had, if I remember right, four wierd looking arms that sprang out. I'm not sure if it had a kicker plate. I didn't see many malfunctions in the military but occaisionally you'd see a May West. That anti-inversion netting probably helped with that.....The Army didn't have it in the early 70's.

A buddy of mine, rode in a May West. He couldn't get his reserve deployed in time. I've heard of other soldiers doing the same thing.....usually without injury.

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That 4 pronged awful pilot chute was packed- laid on it's side on top of the canopy. It was heavy and could be more like a grappling hook. I have one laying around in the loft somewhere. The weight of the 4 pronged spring assembly was surprising. Heavy.

This new system is brilliant, as it launches the pc out, and the orange "spring thing" (see the other guy's picture) just falls away and dies not interfere with the pc; nor is the pc encumbered by the weight of the spring.

I don't know where the small weight is attached on the pc though. Apex? Bottom of suspension lines? or?
Neat!

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JerryBaumchen

Hi Andy,

Quote

the rigs used in most lower-altitude mass airborne drops use reserves that don't have pilot chutes



I was not in the US Army & have never been Airborne rated. However, every rig used for this application that I have seen in over the last 50 yrs have had a pilot chute in the reserve container. The early ones had what we called a 'spider' pilot chute. It used a multi-spring system that folded up somewhat like an umbrella. I never thought that goofy pilot chute could ever pass any testing standard; but it was good enough for those Airborne folks. And from the lowest bidder.

***Shot and a halfs were originally designed for post-landing usage



My thinking is that Capewell needed to come with an answer to Security's One-Shot riser release system. Security patented the One-Shot system so Pioneer could not use it on their 'soon-to-be-developed' Para-Twin rig.

IMO the Army was quite happy with a 2-shot release to deal with being dragged upon landing.

Just the thoughts of an old guy,

JerryBaumchen


Hey, I found these:

Origin of the Capewell Release: Part I

Origin of the Capewell Release: Part II

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dpreguy



I don't know where the small weight is attached on the pc though. Apex? Bottom of suspension lines? or?
Neat!



The new T-11R doesn't have a weight attached to the bridle like the MIRPS did. The canopy is folded on top of the spring and the pilot chute is folded on top of the canopy so the apex of the canopy and the pilot chute is ejected on deployment. The canopy also has scoops at the apex to help the canopy catch air faster.

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dpreguy

That 4 pronged awful pilot chute was packed- laid on it's side on top of the canopy. It was heavy and could be more like a grappling hook. I have one laying around in the loft somewhere. The weight of the 4 pronged spring assembly was surprising. Heavy.

This new system is brilliant, as it launches the pc out, and the orange "spring thing" (see the other guy's picture) just falls away and dies not interfere with the pc; nor is the pc encumbered by the weight of the spring.

I don't know where the small weight is attached on the pc though. Apex? Bottom of suspension lines? or?
Neat!



The new system is far from brilliant, at least the reserve handle itself. The T11R is way to sensitive.
Propblast

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Agreed. I think at least they could make the side tuck tabs a bit longer and/or make the stiffener material stronger so the flippin' handle wasn't so quick to dislodge at the slightest touch. That and I wish idiot jumpers would quit assuming the red handle meant grab at every single opportunity other than the one time they should need it.

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propblast

***I'm curious as to what the civilian reenactors use on their 'simulated' combat S/L jumps?



Mostly T10D

Not so. We use all steerable mains: MC1-1C/D, SET-10's and SF-10A's exclusively. NO T10's. The FAA frowns on non-steerables jumping into crowded airshows. And, by the way, I have never seen a military chest reserve without a pilot chute of one type or another. As far as I know, they have always had them...right from the start back in the '40's.

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Backintothesky

I was wondering if it was that.

Seems a bit of an old fashion system for modern SL rigs no? Any ideas why they haven't converted to 3 ring release with cutaway handle - especially given a number of paratroopers will also be sport skydivers...



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Insignificant numbers.
Military jump-masters hate skydivers because they require excess time to re-train.
Armies prefer to teach any skill from zero.

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