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erdnarob

wraping and tightening the tail center

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I had a discussion (for main packing) with people about the purpose of wraping and tightening the main canopy tail center around the top of the lines. I was surprised to discover that the jumpers are far from being unanimous on why doing so. I would like you people on this forum to write your idea about it. It seems that a lot of jumpers/packers are just doing what they were shown without knowing why or have a wrong explanation.
Learn from others mistakes, you will never live long enough to make them all.

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erdnarob

I had a discussion (for main packing) with people about the purpose of wrapping and tightening the main canopy tail center around the top of the lines. I was surprised to discover that the jumpers are far from being unanimous on why doing so. I would like you people on this forum to write your idea about it. It seems that a lot of jumpers/packers are just doing what they were shown without knowing why or have a wrong explanation.



I remember that time very well. It was after "pro" packing was developed and after many canopies were being made with zero-porosity fabric that was very slippery when new. People needed a way to keep the canopy under control until it was in the bag.

Unfortunately, for a while people were allowing the movement of the tail to move the steering lines around closer to the front of the canopy, causing lineovers.

Now most people know that, and include a warning to a person learning to pro-pack.

An interesting note: I used to "stack" pack new slippery canopies for a few people and I never needed to do much with the tail of the canopy after "mummying" or "cocooning". Since it was on the floor and I was kneeling on it, it was not as difficult to keep under control.

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It is the easiest way to cocoon a packjob and lay it down so it is ready to bag. We don't wrap reserve tails because they follow a much longer but cleaner packing procedure. No one wants to put this amount of time into a main packjob, so if you just wrap the tail around, you can lay it down and throw it in the bag quickly while only creating minimal downsides.

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"It is the easiest way to cocoon a packjob and lay it down so it is ready to bag" and it helps keep the slider in place.
Not only that, but the reserve pack gets the canopy open a little quicker. When students ask about these differences, I go through the details, then sum up by telling them: "If I packed your main like I pack a reserve, you'd hate me, and if I packed your reserve like I pack a main, you'd hate me."
You don't have to outrun the bear.

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erdnarob

I would like you people on this forum to write your idea about it.


I also think cocoon is the key word, keeping the design in a "package", until it's time to open.
There's an alternative packing method with slider grommets out of cocoon (seem to work fine), so I wouldn't say that it has to do with "keeping the slider at the stops"
What goes around, comes later.

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