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aeroflyer

Stowing brakes on Wings?

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I recently bought a new Wings container, and I've been having a problem stowing the excess brake line. When I try to put the excess brake line through the elasticized nylon band that's sewn onto the risers, it often frays as it is really hard to push through there. Does anyone know an easier way to stow the excess line? The problem is the steering line gets wider when I push it though, causing it to fray.

Has anyone used a rubber band put through the normal elastic keeper to stow the excess line instead?

Thanks!

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I saw this thread here:
http://www.dropzone.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=994294;search_string=wings%20brake%20stow;#994294

which says to stow it under the bottom toggle keeper. Plan is to take a look at my rig tomorrow to see if this would work.. I think the wings risers have changed since that thread ^ in 2004.

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I have a Javelin and have the same problem, so i stoped using the keepers.
I know it could cause problems when i grab the toggles but i just look at the excess line and make sure its not entangled before i release the brakes.

I have never tried it, but now that i think of it. You could perhaps use a packboy?
Use the metalpart of it to "grab" the loop of the line on the other side and pull it trough.

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I saw this thread here:
http://www.dropzone.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=994294;search_string=wings%20brake%20stow;#994294

which says to stow it under the bottom toggle keeper. Plan is to take a look at my rig tomorrow to see if this would work.. I think the wings risers have changed since that thread ^ in 2004.



Using the bottom keeper is risky because you might put your fingers through the excess and then release the brakes, then you have your fingers cinched up by the tension! I've seen a few reports here about such things. Much better to keep any excess above where your hands will be grabbing for the toggles. You don't want to make it so that you have to be so careful when grabbing toggles that you must avoid the excess line.
People are sick and tired of being told that ordinary and decent people are fed up in this country with being sick and tired. I’m certainly not, and I’m sick and tired of being told that I am

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This is what the owners manual says:

"Setting the brakes: Your Wings harness is equipped with a
unique velcro-less toggle system which facilitates complete
stowage of excess steering line. Pull the control line down until
the brake loop just passes through the guide ring. Insert the
toggle through the brake loop and into the upper stow pocket
on the riser. Fold the excess control line and insert it into the
lower toggle pocket. Insert the toggle into the lower pocket on
top of the excess control line."

So it says to stow the excess brake line in the lower pocket underneath the toggle? I agree you could get your finger stuck in there.

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not an uncommon problem to have and the answer is much simpler than you may realise.

I will take you through step by step...

pull the line down until the brake setting is through the ring and set the toggle.

now set the toggle into the upper keeper.

turn the riser over so you are looking at the reverse side.

Squeeze the riser from the sides so that the elastic forms a bulge away from the riser and set the excess line through (I go from container towards canopy with the excess myself)

once the excess is stowed turn the riser back over and place the lower part of the toggle into the appropriate keeper.

It is very difficult to set the excess with the toggle in the lower keeper but really quite easy if its not in place hence the sequence above.

let me know how you get on.
:)
I like my canopy...


...it lets me down.

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when stowing the excess thru the loop on the backside of the riser, I find it helps alot to 'twist up' the gathered excess, and then 'push' it thru the loop attached to the riser. Once the little turtle head appears, gently grab it and pull it a bit
Randomly f'n thingies up since before I was born...

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> When I try to put the excess brake line through the elasticized nylon band that's sewn onto the risers, it often frays as it is really hard to push through there.

I use a power tool or packer boy to stow the excess brakes on wings.
Lock, Dock and Two Smoking Barrelrolls!

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I had an issue with stowing the excess as well. Was shown the method described by koppel and it works great. No extra tools required. I fold the extra line length in half and the bulk makes it easier to push through with the line well contained within the keeper.
50 donations so far. Give it a try.

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+1

This is almost exactly how I do it, except I push through from canopy towards container. I also use a variation on Monkey's approach, folding the excess into thirds before threading it through the back side of the lower toggle keeper. As stated by others, it is much easier to stow the excess if you leave the lower toggle tab unstowed. Once the excess line is in place, set the lower toggle keeper and you're done.
Matthew Wallin
C-37899

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This works for my Javelin Odyssey: Stick the end of the toggle through the cat eye, as normal when setting the brakes. Take the excess line loop and thread it through the loop at the top end of the riser (the hole the rapide link attaches to). Bring the brake line loop back down to the toggle stow. Stick the end of the toggle through the loop and into the toggle stow.

A couple things to think about when/before using this technique:

1) DO NOT do this if you are using any sort of soft link.
2) This should only be done when you have enough excess brake line so the line still has some slack in it when the riser is fully stretched. Imagine the riser after deployment.

Hope this helps, but only do this if you are sure it won’t interfere with your deployment.

Blues…
Marriage is like a deck of cards. You start with two harts and a diamond only to discover you wish you had a club and a spade!

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why not if you are using a soft link?



Inside the riser, where the soft link is joined with it's larks head, you wouldn't want the brake line snagging that knot as it pulls through when releasing the brake. A rapide link will not be affected.

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Beside given advises
I had cut off some exessive material folded and sewed (and which has sharp rigid melted edges) inside the keeper's channel. The stowing became much smoother and no more frying))

Also, due to a lot of slack on my steering lines I use the combined stowing method
first - pass the slack thruogh the softlink and stowe it in lower elastik keeper. So there no lines around the riser and no interfere with slider at all when it pass behind the haed
Why drink and drive, if you can smoke and fly?

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I just got a save two days ago from a brake line issue on a Wings. He reached through the excess when he released his brakes and knotted one steering line. He was about 100 feet away from me when he chopped. Wish I still had my camera rolling when he did it.

So what I do to prevent this (and reduce the severity of a toggle-fire):

1. Set the brake and stow the upper keeper.
2. Stick the metal part of a packing powertool through the keeper on the back of the riser, and wrap the excess around the groove to make it easy to pull through.
3. Take this tail back around the front, and catch it under the lower keeper.
4. pull the excess tight against the bottom keeper by tugging above the backside keeper.

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I went to Ben Franklin and bought a $2 metal crochet hook. (Plastic ones may have burrs on the mold parting line) Push it down through the elastic fold excess brake line and pull through with hook. Line is still held securely in place and I've never had a problem with the line not coming out smoothly or coming out early. I used to use a power tool but it took longer. A friend showed me this so I can't take credit for it. Thanks Deaner!
"If I can't be my own, I'll feel better dead." Layne Staley

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This works for my Javelin Odyssey: Stick the end of the toggle through the cat eye, as normal when setting the brakes. Take the excess line loop and thread it through the loop at the top end of the riser (the hole the rapide link attaches to). Bring the brake line loop back down to the toggle stow. Stick the end of the toggle through the loop and into the toggle stow.

A couple things to think about when/before using this technique:

1) DO NOT do this if you are using any sort of soft link.
2) This should only be done when you have enough excess brake line so the line still has some slack in it when the riser is fully stretched. Imagine the riser after deployment.

Hope this helps, but only do this if you are sure it won’t interfere with your deployment.

Blues…



I don't know who taught you that, but I'd suggest that you go back to the manufacturers' recommendation recommendation as opposed to making stuff up.
My reality and yours are quite different.
I think we're all Bozos on this bus.
Falcon5232, SCS8170, SCSA353, POPS9398, DS239

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why not if you are using a soft link?



Inside the riser, where the soft link is joined with it's larks head, you wouldn't want the brake line snagging that knot as it pulls through when releasing the brake. A rapide link will not be affected.



Wrong answer.....wear on the soft link.
he soft link tab is tacked down.
My reality and yours are quite different.
I think we're all Bozos on this bus.
Falcon5232, SCS8170, SCSA353, POPS9398, DS239

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why not if you are using a soft link?



Inside the riser, where the soft link is joined with it's larks head, you wouldn't want the brake line snagging that knot as it pulls through when releasing the brake. A rapide link will not be affected.



Wrong answer.....wear on the soft link.
he soft link tab is tacked down.



I get a few reserves a year that don't have the soft links tacked down... It's pretty rare to even see it on a main. :S

(yes, I tack them)
"I may be a dirty pirate hooker...but I'm not about to go stand on the corner." iluvtofly
DPH -7, TDS 578, Muff 5153, SCR 14890
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When I first tried packing a Wings, it was a pain in the ass to get the lines in the keeper. Then I realized I was stowing the toggles and line in the wrong order. Put the upper tab through the cat's eye and keeper. Next put the excess brake line in the keeper on the back side of the riser. Only then stow the lower toggle keeper. Having the lower toggle keeper stowed makes the elastic for the lines much tighter. Problem solved.
50 donations so far. Give it a try.

You know you want to spank it
Jump an Infinity

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I get a few reserves a year that don't have the soft links tacked down... It's pretty rare to even see it on a main. :S

(yes, I tack them)



I'll probably get flamed, but what is the reason that they should be (for either) beyond cosmetic's sake?

My main never has been, nor has my reserve. No problems on a recent cutaway...

Asking because I don't know... please be gentle.

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