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JohnMitchell

Keeping track of time

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Bertt

I wonder how many people who jump with a full face helmet have practiced quickly opening the visor. (that's a real question, 'cause I have a Protec and goggles)



I have, on the ground... think I'll give it a go in the air next time I get to jump.

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JohnMitchell

I just read May's incident reports in Parachutist. A jumper with 200 jumps frosted over his full face visor when breaking off at 4500'. He couldn't read his altimeter so he kept tracking until his audible sounded and his red light flashed at 1500'. He pulled his main and ended up with 2 out after his AAD fired. . .



[:/]


My immediate thought is that I'd class that as a malfunction and stop the skydive. 3 or 4 big wave-offs then deploy my main... I'd rather not be in freefall (particularly at deployment altitude) and not be able to see what's around me.

To continue it until 1500 (and to rely on a dytter to tell you when that is) is absolute insanity. No other word for it.


It's not just gadget dependency - it's worse than that. It shows a serious lack of thought and understanding.
I don't want to be in the sky with a robot.

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Perhaps it was mentioned somewhere in the thread and I missed it...but for me the biggest problem with this jumpers action is the line of flight. If he couldn't see his alti, I doubt he knew his tracking direction and 18 seconds could have easily introduced him to some 'new' friends up or down the line of flight.

__________________________________________

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I'd definitely go with wave and pull. How much time could someone waste trying to rip off the face plate?

Wendy P.
There is nothing more dangerous than breaking a basic safety rule and getting away with it. It removes fear of the consequences and builds false confidence. (tbrown)

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I used to challenge myself to play "beat the beeper."
I tried to time my skydive so that I only heard my Dytter Mark 1 during opening. I backed that game with: timing, cloud altitudes, a visual altimeter on my wrist and eye-balling the ground. By mid-summer, I was consistently hearing my Dytter during line stretch.

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riggerrob

I used to challenge myself to play "beat the beeper."
I tried to time my skydive so that I only heard my Dytter Mark 1 during opening. I backed that game with: timing, cloud altitudes, a visual altimeter on my wrist and eye-balling the ground. By mid-summer, I was consistently hearing my Dytter during line stretch.

Good strategy. Use it as a back up, not a wake up. ;)

I had a tandem riser knock my last audible off into the Pacific Northwest woods about 8 years ago. Haven't used one since. So far, so good. :)

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riggerrob

Centuries from now, your lost audible is going to confuse some archeologist!!!!!
Hah!
Hah!



Actually, the archeologist will send it back to L&B and get a free replacement.
50 donations so far. Give it a try.

You know you want to spank it
Jump an Infinity

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monkycndo

***Centuries from now, your lost audible is going to confuse some archeologist!!!!!
Hah!
Hah!



Actually, the archeologist will send it back to L&B and get a free replacement.


ACTUALLY...centuries from now I WILL FIND IT and send it in! :P










~ If you choke a Smurf, what color does it turn? ~

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I was always told to count in my head when tracking. 5s per 1000f. I am also a gadget person. I trust my audible to beep just as much as a trust my digital wrist anti to show me the correct altitude. Both are L&B. My audible beeps every .5s when tracking. makes a correct count even simpler to keep. That being said not only is waiting that long crazy, who burns through -I'm assuming- at least 1 other alarm at a higher altitude? In addition to the other topics this thread has brought up proper audible settings should be included. My "oh shit pull immediately" alarm is set 1000 feet above my cypress activation height. That way the chances of a 2 out are greatly reduced.

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Not trying to take away from your discussion John, but I think this guys answer is more simple than that. In AFF, which seems to be the majority of skydive training these days, the most simple concept is taught from the get go.

When loose altitude awareness, pull.

In the FJC it is covered as the pull priorities, prior to the release dive it should be covered again as some form of the A.I.R. rule.

Sounds like this lesson wasn't fully understood. Hope someone sat him down and explained this too him, as well as pointing out how he just cheated the reaper.
----------------------------------------------
You're not as good as you think you are. Seriously.

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yoink

***I just read May's incident reports in Parachutist. A jumper with 200 jumps frosted over his full face visor when breaking off at 4500'. He couldn't read his altimeter so he kept tracking until his audible sounded and his red light flashed at 1500'. He pulled his main and ended up with 2 out after his AAD fired. . .



[:/]


My immediate thought is that I'd class that as a malfunction and stop the skydive. 3 or 4 big wave-offs then deploy my main... I'd rather not be in freefall (particularly at deployment altitude) and not be able to see what's around me.

To continue it until 1500 (and to rely on a dytter to tell you when that is) is absolute insanity. No other word for it.


It's not just gadget dependency - it's worse than that. It shows a serious lack of thought and understanding.
I don't want to be in the sky with a robot.

Just an interesting (to me) side note about time perception. Yesterday I did and XRW practice jump and broke off at 5,000 when my audible sounded. My second alarm is at 4,000. I flew and flew and flew, waiting on the second alarm. I thought, it that thing broken? Finally I looked at my chest mount....still not at 4,000. But based on previous experience, I knew I had to be getting close.

On the way home I told my wife, I was not counting time but just my perception, I call it at 18+ seconds, I know I had to have flown 18 seconds (or more) between those two alarms. I was working on min vertical speed and it ended up being 22 seconds.

I think our internal clocks are better than we might think, if we just pay attention.
Instructor quote, “What's weird is that you're older than my dad!”

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Bertt

I wonder how many people who jump with a full face helmet have practiced quickly opening the visor. (that's a real question, 'cause I have a Protec and goggles)

Quote



If one jumper's visor has frosted up, it's likely that others in the group have too. Who tracked which direction will be a huge issue. Can you now even see a wave off if it was in front and below ? if one group's visors have frosted up, what about the other groups on the jump run ......... are you tracking toward them while they are tracking toward you ? Even with separation, extended tracking brings it all back together. [:/]

Life is short ... jump often.

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Andy9o8

Quote

...there's more emphasis taught on specific altitudes for turning onto the last legs to landing....



Thus insuring that everyone will be at the same place and the same altitude often at the same time or just seconds apart. Brilliant.
Chuck Akers
D-10855
Houston, TX

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chuckakers

***...there's more emphasis taught on specific altitudes for turning onto the last legs to landing....



Thus insuring that everyone will be at the same place and the same altitude often at the same time or just seconds apart. Brilliant.

Yup. Hey, I'm not an instructor, just observing what wuz and what iz.

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OK boyz and gurlz,
"WHEN IN DOUBT, WHIP IT OUT!!
As my sky-bud "Sammy Skull," His Majesty the Reaper's Royal Scribe would say,"When ya' pass thru 3-5 ya', got about "5" to 2-5 when ya' should dump!! If, ya' know ya' left 3-5 over 5 seconds ago dum-dum....Do I really have to tell ya',"IT'S TIME TO PULL >>>NOW!!!!" ....

Sam and I have lurked more Craters than we care to have. Rather unfortunate for those that tried to snort more dirt than they thought they could... "Quote: Dirty Ed" Any way, every Crater tells a Story and generally, all of them could have been prevented by judicious Deployment a Parachute at an appropriate altitude!!
SCR-2034, SCS-680

III%,
Deli-out

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JohnMitchell

***
"WHEN IN DOUBT, WHIP IT OUT!!

"When ya' pass thru 3-5 ya', got about "5" to 2-5 when ya' should dump!!

That's how I was trained and I'm still here.:)
Quote

every Crater tells a Story

My favorite Rod Stewart song. . . :P
Hi John,
I don't think Rod was talkin' 'bout "Craters!!" But, Craters do tell stories, probably the most "Classic" was Rick Nelson's Graduation Dive with Anna Bedori!! That was the one that Doc Johnson made into the "Bird Bath!!!!!!" Oh the stories from "Scare-Us-Valley!!" Grab a couple of Beers at the "Bomb Shelter" and I'll have more!!!!"
SCR-2034, SCS-680

III%,
Deli-out

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