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alexey

Drop feed vs needle feed for container work

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Do you realy need needle feed for that type of work?

I thinking about buying second machine.
Now I have medium class 2-needles needle feed, but dont realy like to work on it on containers - because I have problems with attachments (changing distance between needles and binder), and its difficult to adjust for different material.

May be, good medium to heavy type machine with drop feed will be easier to adjust with binder and for different materials...
Lexa

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Nothing beats a good walking foot (which also has a needle feed action) for working on containers.



But, how did you connect binder to walking foot?
Because, if you connect it to bed - there will be changing distance between walking foot and binder, and binding tape will jamming there?
Lexa

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it is possible to connect a binder to a walking foot machine but you must buy the right parts to make it work.
The distance from the binder to the foot is manageable when using the right attachment and jamming of the tape should not be a problem. Look up Atlanta Attachment. Sorry, I don't have the number handy. Good luck
Kevin

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Do you realy need needle feed for that type of work?

I thinking about buying second machine.
Now I have medium class 2-needles needle feed, but dont realy like to work on it on containers - because I have problems with attachments (changing distance between needles and binder), and its difficult to adjust for different material.

May be, good medium to heavy type machine with drop feed will be easier to adjust with binder and for different materials...





Built many containers with a normal single needle straight sew. The only time I've ever needed a needle feed was during the back pad and container(s) intergration phase. This is due to the thickness encountered by sewing multiple layers already bound edges together. It can be done with a normal straight sew but it's a pain in the ass.


Minimum number of machines to build a rig (correctly):

1) Straight sew.
2) 42 stitch bartacker.
3) 3/16" spaced needle feed twin.
4) 7 class (for harness work)


Every other machine one would use for building harness/ containers is nice to have and make the job a whole lot easier, but these are the minimum requirements (although I have seen the bartacker left off the list, not recomended)
Mick.

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