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SarahC07

At what point...

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... do you finally determine that you really actually do HATE your job? And that it's in your best interest to make a change?

Lots of people don't like to work, but I feel an obsessive amount of hatred towards my daily routine responsibilities.

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Curious to hear everyone's thoughts / opinions.... and yes, I realize I'm being vague.

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... do you finally determine that you really actually do HATE your job? And that it's in your best interest to make a change?

Lots of people don't like to work, but I feel an obsessive amount of hatred towards my daily routine responsibilities.

---

Curious to hear everyone's thoughts / opinions.... and yes, I realize I'm being vague.



The minute you start getting stressed about the little things...

If you're not having fun, its just work... in the long run, its never going to be fun... Find something fun that you can do and you'll find you a new person!
"I may be a dirty pirate hooker...but I'm not about to go stand on the corner." iluvtofly
DPH -7, TDS 578, Muff 5153, SCR 14890
I'm an asshole, and I approve this message

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When the fear of change is outweighed by the pain of not changing.

When you can honestly say "I'd rather be out of work, eating at the Salvation Army because I can't find another job than being here at this job"

I have had a few bad weeks in a row at work myself.
It seems to happen in the beginning of each year. I'm not sure why, but the 1st quarter has been unpleasant for the past several years.

The idea of quitting, moving south and living on a DZ as a rigger/packer/pilot has it's attractions.

But I need/want the security and benefits that my job has, and I do really like it.
"There are NO situations which do not call for a French Maid outfit." Lucky McSwervy

"~ya don't GET old by being weak & stupid!" - Airtwardo

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Being thankful for what you have, and wanting something better for yourself are not mutually exclusive...

I joined the military because it was the only life I knew, I wasn't ready for the real world. That was 6 years ago, I'm ready to put the skills and knowledge I dedicated a LOT of time learning on the market for fair compensation.

I believe I have valuable skills and a good work ethic. Maybe I'll do well and maybe I'll end up on the street corner, but I'll never forgive myself for not trying.
"Damn you Gravity, you win again"

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When the bad far outweighs the good and there is seemingly no change in sight.

Luckilly for me we're always going through mergers and reorgs so if I don't like something it's prolly not gonna stick around too long anyways. :)
Stupidity if left untreated is self-correcting
If ya can't be good, look good, if that fails, make 'em laugh.

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Being thankful for what you have, and wanting something better for yourself are not mutually exclusive...

I joined the military because it was the only life I knew, I wasn't ready for the real world. That was 6 years ago, I'm ready to put the skills and knowledge I dedicated a LOT of time learning on the market for fair compensation.

I believe I have valuable skills and a good work ethic. Maybe I'll do well and maybe I'll end up on the street corner, but I'll never forgive myself for not trying.



Reminds me of my blood brother, we both got arrested (he was guilty, I wasn't even there when it happened, so they released me) anyway, they offered him either 4 years in the military, or 2 years in Prison, (this was during Vietnam) He came out of the Navy a scuba diver,and and underwater welder, He was making great bucks, while I was still working the Carnival, and washing dished during the winter...

This is a long ass way of saying, You made a wise choice! Plus , thank you for your service to our country!I'll buy you a beer if we ever meet!

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I am trying to figure out this EVERYDAY. I don't like my job, I hate my bosses, but the job is good money. I have been poor before I don't want to do that again. I have the instructor's ratings to fall back on, but I don't think I could do that full time. I hate my job but I have the courage to leave it and try something new. The usual fear of failure I guess. [:/]

Does anyone have a story to share where they left their job to venture onto something else and they succeeded?
http://3ringnecklace.com/

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I'm sorry, I first interpreted your comment as condescending, hence my rant... now that I read it again I can see I probably misinterpreted it.

Can't wait to make it back to the great Pacific Coast, unfortunately it looks like my best job prospects will keep me down in the dirty south a little while longer.
"Damn you Gravity, you win again"

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Does anyone have a story to share where they left their job to venture onto something else and they succeeded?



Sort of.

At 32 I decided I hated my mill job and wanted to go back to college. I got started, and for 2 years took one class per term (including summer) and lived super cheap (including living with my parents) to save up as much as possible.

I quit my job and started school full time as a sophomore. At the end of the first semester of full time "studenthood" I had 35 credits, a 3.85GPA and had been accepted for the following year (as a junior) at UW Madison for computer engineering.
The 35 credits included stuff like Calculus, Chemistry and Calc-based Physics.

Halfway through the 2nd semester, I "imploded".
I'm still not exactly sure what happend, but it was no longer the right place for me. So I bailed.
I goofed of for a month, and then signed up at the local tech college for Commercial Truck Driving School.

2 1/2 months later I was driving over the road.

No regrets. I truly love what I do. I don't make anywhere near the money an engineer does, but I have enough to be happy.

If I had continued with school, I would have entered the workforce nearing 40, up to my eyeballs in student debt, as the economy was crashing and the jobs were moving overseas.

I often say that even though it didn't work out the way I planned, I never would have been able to plan it working out as well as it has.
"There are NO situations which do not call for a French Maid outfit." Lucky McSwervy

"~ya don't GET old by being weak & stupid!" - Airtwardo

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For any decision like this, when I feel the same way after a set amount of time. Might be a relationship, might be a job, whatever, but I give it a couple of months to make sure it's just not one of the usual up/down cycles we all go through.

But if you hate your job and it's been dragging on you for months, then start looking for a new one. Don't quit, take your time and find something else you'd really like. Might include a career change too. Be prepared for that to end up sucking too when you're done with the "honeymoon" period and be ready to move from that too. Eventually you get something that works.

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I've been trying to figure out how to find a good job in the field that I'm in but it is next to impossible- I only have a Masters Degree and in the field of sport psychology if you don't have a PhD, you are lucky if you have a job in the field at all. So I have been trying to figure out what other field I would want to go to. I've been bouncing around other ideas. My latest idea is to get a certification in personal training and maybe go over to that field instead. And no, I don't want to get a PhD in sport psych. Too much research.
http://3ringnecklace.com/

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Hi air,

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Does anyone have a story to share where they left their job to venture onto something else and they succeeded?



In early '64 I had a dead-end job & REALLY hated it. Then I read in the paper that the City of Portland was taking applications for the Fire Bureau. I, along with 900+ other guys, signed up. It consisted of a written test & then an oral interview. In the written test I came in 2nd to a Battalion Chief's son. After the oral interview, I aced him out and was listed #1 on the results.

A month or so later I was sworn in as a Firefighter trainee. Five months later I was terminated; I really did not like the fire dep't as it was too much like the military and I had just finished a 4-yr hitch seven months prior to going into the fire dept'. I got sacked because a lieutentant from another shift made a smart remark to me & I told him where he could put it. Bureaucracies don't look kindly on those types of things.

I started college, at a local Comm. College; I had to work to go to school as my family did not have the money to help out. 6 1/2 yrs later I had a degree in Mech. Engineering. It was a great career move for me; might not be for some other person.

I am a strong believer that tomorrow will always be a better day.

JerryBaumchen

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... do you finally determine that you really actually do HATE your job? And that it's in your best interest to make a change?



For me, I make a change when I’m unhappy more than 50% of the time (about whatever). It’s a subjective system but works for me.



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Does anyone have a story to share where they left their job to venture onto something else and they succeeded?



I left the company I co-founded in April 2003 (got bought out) not knowing exactly what I was going to do next.

For my next job I moved 2250 miles across country knowing noone in the new town and initially took a 70% pay cut. I've pursued my passion to places, experiences, and successes that I would never have imagined if someone had posed the notional scenario to me 10 years ago. :)
/Marg

Act as if everything you do matters, while laughing at yourself for thinking anything you do matters.
Tibetan Buddhist saying

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do you finally determine that you really actually do HATE your job? And that it's in your best interest to make a change?



The instant you can consistently predict both the worst decision your boss could make AND that he/she will make that decision.:|

Time to GTFO.
Skydivers don't knock on Death's door. They ring the bell and runaway... It really pisses him off.
-The World Famous Tink. (I never heard of you either!!)
AA #2069 ASA#33 POPS#8808 Swooo 1717

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Possibly my biggest career mistake was going into the fire dept. The only advantage I got was that I was able to retire at the age of 46. Granted a broken 46, but 46 none the less. Wouldn't do it again though.
Skydivers don't knock on Death's door. They ring the bell and runaway... It really pisses him off.
-The World Famous Tink. (I never heard of you either!!)
AA #2069 ASA#33 POPS#8808 Swooo 1717

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It has happened to me a couple of times in my life.. After 7 years in the military, I literally felt like I couldn't be bothered to get out of bed in the mornings to get into work.. I just felt completely depressed despite the fact that there wasn't anything "really" wrong with my job.. I just desperately needed a change.. I up and moved country & never looked back.

At one point, I was doing a sales-type job.. I absolutely HATED it from day one. After just 3 months, I thought "if I continue doing this job, I will have to jump off the roof".. So I left.

After nearly 3 years with my current company, I'm starting to feel like poking my eyes out with a fork sounds like more fun than going into work.. I mean.. I always hated my roles in this business, but loved so much about it (people, exciting business, perks, location, etc.).. There just came a point where I felt like I'm regressing rather than progressing from a professional standpoint. I don't want to become bitter and disgruntled for what was essentially a pretty amazing couple of years.. So I handed in my notice in Dec & I finish in a few weeks.

The one thing that has always allowed me to move without fearing the consequences is that I've managed to save money along the way. I think Financial independence/savings means you can (literally) afford to make bold choices in your life & pursue what will make you happy.

Never regretted any career changes I've made :)
"There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse."
- Chris Hadfield
« Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. »
- my boss

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Does anyone have a story to share where they left their job to venture onto something else and they succeeded?



Ditto to the question above.



I graduated from Virginia Tech in '97 with degrees in Materials Engineering and Spanish. I had five years at a plant I loved (it closed) and one year at a plant I disliked (they laid me off) and when I moved back to Virginia to live with my then-girlfriend-now-wife, I had a hard time finding a gig. I took the off time while job searching to take an EMT course, and found a completely new track on life. I went to nursing school, got my ADN and RN, then got my Paramedic. Now I'm just putting in my time and rounding out my resume so I can start posting for flight nurse positions. Oh yeah, and losing weight too: air medical companies don't like us "husky" guys.

Engineering wasn't a bad gig, and if I'd found something worthwhile when I moved back up here I'd probably still be doing it today. But... I was really disappointed with the management track: the further up the ladder I moved, the less I enjoyed my job. Also, finding jobs was getting tougher: you could still find them but you definitely had to go to the jobs (often in a very different state) rather than just finding something nearby.

Going from engineering to nursing/EMS is a big change, but I'm thrilled with the changes I've made in my life. I'm not going to tell you I love my job because I don't: I don't want to be an ICU nurse for the rest of my life, but even after 2.5 years I'm still learning every day and it's preparing me for what I DO want to do for the rest of my life, i.e. critical care transport.

My suggestion: look around. It isn't an all or nothing thing; you don't need to quit and live out of the trunk of your car while you look for a new career. Think about what you think you might enjoy doing. Look into what is required to do that job. Find out how you can earn the needed qualifications/degrees/experience. You'd be surprised how many opportunities exist if you're willing to look for them and spend a little time working toward them. You will most likely even be able to begin toward your new goal (taking a couple classes or working somewhere part time, for example) while still holding onto the security of your current job.

Elvisio "changed career gears" Rodriguez

P.S. I've mentioned it in another thread a couple years ago: I would HIGHLY recommend looking into your local community college system. Most community colleges offer great opportunities that are affordable and accessible and also reasonably lucrative once you have the degree/certificate.

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