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jumper03

Slinks!

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So we use them on the main and can use them on some reserves. I saw a bridle attached to a canopy this weekend with a slink and thought "damn thats cool!"

Got me thinking - anywhere else we can use slinks instead of metal?

What about using larger cord in the same fashion for hip rings? chest rings?
Scars remind us that the past is real

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I've been using a slink for attaching my main for nearly 2 years now (and I'm more then sure that I'm not the first one to do that), I wanted less metal bumping around up there and I've chased a number of PC/D-bags that became freebags after the rapid link coming undone, so it seemed like the simple solution. Called the rig manufacture and asked, they said "huh, good idea, we don't see any reason why not." And I never looked back.


I thought hip rings and chest rings needed to be smooth to facilitate the webbing sliding around a bit on the metal, thus making the harness articulate?
--"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."

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So we use them on the main and can use them on some reserves. I saw a bridle attached to a canopy this weekend with a slink and thought "damn thats cool!"

Got me thinking - anywhere else we can use slinks instead of metal?



The PD approved slinks on the reserve also eliminate having your reserve riser metal links from digging into your back after a fresh repack, as some people have complained about.

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What about using larger cord in the same fashion for hip rings? chest rings?



It's called a non articulated harness. :P


Be safe.
Ed
www.WestCoastWingsuits.com
www.PrecisionSkydiving.com

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An even better solution...if your bridle attachment allows it, is to larkshead the dbag and bridle to the canopy attachment.

Also, using large slinks for hip and chest rings would not be safe. While they would hold up just fine i'm sure, they would wear very easily. There would be a constant friction on the "link/ring" making it wear very quickly...and I would much rather have a dbag or riser link fail...than have my harness come apart!


Cheers,
Travis

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An even better solution...if your bridle attachment allows it, is to larkshead the dbag and bridle to the canopy attachment.



You mean like how the sigma d-bag is attached to the canopy? I HATE pulling that whole damn bag through that itty bitty loop. Job would go mad doing it.
Scars remind us that the past is real

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My bridle/dbag is attached that way and I can remove or install it in a couple minutes, you just have to roll the dbag and it fits through the hole (on my Mirage at least)... far less time than it would take to find a wrench to get the damn rapide link open. ;):P
NSCR-2376, SCR-15080

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My bridle/dbag is attached that way and I can remove or install it in a couple minutes, you just have to roll the dbag and it fits through the hole (on my Mirage at least)... far less time than it would take to find a wrench to get the damn rapide link open. ;):P



you've obviously never had to assemble a sigma....

bag is HUGE...loop is tiny.
Scars remind us that the past is real

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I have had to assemble a sigma as well as many other tandem deployment bags attached to the canopy in that manner. In some it may take a little extra effort, but it is far worth it to not have friction burns on the topskin of your canopy and also the fact that you dont have to constantly keep checking your links to make sure they are properly closed and in good maintenence. I can tell you one thing for sure...pulling a dbag and drogue through that loop on the end is not near the hardest thing to do in the rigging world.


Cheers,
Travis

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An even better solution...if your bridle attachment allows it, is to larkshead the dbag and bridle to the canopy attachment.



Try using a bridle extention about 6 inches long made from 3/4" tubular nylon.
----------------------------------------------
You're not as good as you think you are. Seriously.

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You people don't actually BELIEVE that soft links are an improvment over Rapide links, do you?



They're much stronger, less bulky, weigh less, and if they're going to fail, they're more than likely going to do it on opening. So, yes, I do believe they are.
Sky, Muff Bro, Rodriguez Bro, and
Bastion of Purity and Innocence!™

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Try this...get your rigger to pack it a little neater.



Please explain, "Oh Wise One", on where to put the risers and metal Rapide links anywhere other then the bottom of the packing tray, which means up against the back of the user, when packing according to the manufacturers instructions? :S



Ed
www.WestCoastWingsuits.com
www.PrecisionSkydiving.com

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Hmmm? They're much stronger...says who? Stronger than what? Metal? No. I've heard that 'stronger' argument before and I ain't buyin' it. Now it's fair to say that I have never seen any figures comparing the strength of French Links versus Soft Links but I'm betting you haven't either. Somebody at the DZ just told you that, right? But let's say there are figures that show that soft links are stronger. How did they do the tests? How long and at which points did they pull from? For how many years? And on and on. And I'd be willing to bet that over the course of, let's just pick a number, say 500 jumps....that there's a better chance that four french links would retain their shape and strength characteristics versus four soft links. And there's the 'nylon rubbing against nylon' factor as well. And what do you mean by saying that they're more likely to break on opening? Is that good? Are you wanting to build in a 'breaking point' on your system? And unless that Stileto of your's is down in the double digit range and you are closing in on the top ten at next years SWOOP NATIONALS, bulk and weight ain't an issue.

And here's the real point: They didn't fill a need or solve a problem! When did Rapide Links become weak, bulky, heavy and hard to use?

There is one thing for sure that soft links have over metal links: They are cheaper to manufacture and that lowers the overhead on a canopy. I wonder if that's why they are so popular now?
"It's only arrogance if you can't back it up"

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Wise One! I like that. But I think they should be all capital letters. Like this...WISE ONE. Yea.

You're right about that 'bottom of the packing tray' deal, Ed. I sure as hell can't figger out a way to get 'em into the freebag either. So until someone does, try lying them side by side instead of one on top of the other. See if you can go down a link size. Maybe a set of soft covers for the links. Make sure the reserve is the right size for the container. But I'm sure you knew alla that.

If all else fails, maybe it's time to switch container brands? Or you could put some of them newfangled soft links on it because PD told you it was the only way to go.
"It's only arrogance if you can't back it up"

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Says who?;) Now that's funny...

"In our tests, the Performance Design's Slinks survived at loadings beyond the suspension lines and/or riser! In our testing, the failure point of the system was repeatedly the suspension lines or the webbing attaching the three rings to the riser. In comparison tests, the PD reserve soft link survived tests that caused failures and/or severe damage to #4 and #5 stainless steel links! The PD Soft links not only survived these tests, but showed no signs of damage.

Based upon the results of these extensive tests, Performance Designs is the first manufacturer ever to receive FAA 'TSO' approval for a soft link for use on reserve parachutes!"


Yes, certain types of nylon braid can have a much higher tensile strength than metal. Size for size, even spider thread is much stronger than steel wire.

Also, you don't have to worry about side-loading with Slinks like you do with Maillon Rapide's, which become much weaker when side-loaded.

As for nylon rubbing against nylon, that happens to the lines on your canopy that happen to be finger-trapped as well, such as where the lower control line meets the cats-eye.

As for the openings, yes, I'd much rather it fail on opening than to find out too low that I've had a Maillon Rapide come open because it was under or over-tightened and then dump out the lines at a low altitude after a turn.

Soft links in several forms have been used for over a decade. Just like anything else, they still have to be maintained, but they offer several advantages over a Maillon Rapide.

And I do care about bulk, I jump larger canopies in a smaller container. It packs up like a brick, and before I put reserve Slinks on my Tempo, I could feel them dig into my back. The way my Mirage packs, there's nowhere else for them to go, so I got rid of them.
Sky, Muff Bro, Rodriguez Bro, and
Bastion of Purity and Innocence!™

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try lying them side by side instead of one on top of the other.



Manufacturers never suggest one one top of the other, so why would anyone pack this way? :S


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See if you can go down a link size.



Packing a customers rig doesn't mean changing their gear unless requested to do so, now does it?

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Maybe a set of soft covers for the links.



Usually makes more bulk in this case.

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Make sure the reserve is the right size for the container.



If a someone asks, I try to suggest the correct size reserve for the container. ;)


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If all else fails, maybe it's time to switch container brands?



Thats their choice, not mine.

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Or you could put some of them newfangled soft links on it because PD told you it was the only way to go.



Have you ever heard PD say anything of the sort?
They do have great products though. :)
Be safe.
Ed
www.WestCoastWingsuits.com
www.PrecisionSkydiving.com

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And here's the real point: They didn't fill a need or solve a problem! When did Rapide Links become weak, bulky, heavy and hard to use?



And before there were rapide links there were "connector links". What problem did the rapide links solve or what need did they fill. Could it be that they were lighter with less pack volume?

When did L-links become weak, bulky, heavy and hard to use?

Sparky
My idea of a fair fight is clubbing baby seals

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