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zcohen13

Malfunctions

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zcohen13

I'm a newer jumper (only 12 jumps) and want to go over the list of malfunctions again and what to do in those situations to possibly fix it before cutting away. Does anybody have a link to somewhere I can find this?



Learn your EP's in person from your instructors, not over the internet.
"The restraining order says you're only allowed to touch me in freefall"
=P

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There are not many "malfunctions" you are going to be able to "fix" while hurdling towards the planet at break neck speed. Cutaway/reserve deployment is the procedure("fix") you should be worried about doing, and find out why and what happened and how to prevent it from happening again when you are safe on the ground. In flight rigging more often then not doesnt end well, and even if you figure out whats F*ed up its too late to do anything about.

Like a previous poster said,learn your EP's from your resident instructors and practice them. Fabric over your head, then rigging.

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tikl68


Like a previous poster said,learn your EP's from your resident instructors and practice them. Fabric over your head, then rigging.



I probably should have elaborated instead of just firing off a one liner.

There is a good deal of context involved in evaluating these situation.

First, you need to have a very strong understanding of what your hard deck or decision altitude, and it is key that you have conversations with your instructors to evaluate that you are correctly interpreting this information.

The right information, understood the wrong way, can be dangerous. Websites and lists are notoriously inept when it comes to evaluating your understanding of critical concepts.

Line twists are a perfect example. They can be "fixed" by certain techniques that allows the twists to unwind. But that information alone is not enough because while a line twist after opening can be considered a mild nuisance above your decision altitude, a line twist below your decision altitude is indeed a serious malfunction because a canopy in line twists is uncontrollable, and not configured for landing.

Then we need to consider when you go beyond the altitude window where you must initiate emergency procedures because you have a malfunctioning main canopy, into the window where you are too low to complete your emergency procedures and get a fully deployed and flying reserve.

Ask these questions in person, and ask your instructors to test your understanding of the concepts.
"The restraining order says you're only allowed to touch me in freefall"
=P

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Safest option: is it there? Is it square? Is it controllable?

If not: get the fuck off it.

There's a very limited amount of in air rigging that can successfully be achieved in an exceptionally limited set of circumstances. In time, there may be opportunities to incorporate some more outlandish thoughts into your responses to a wide variety of potential malfunctions but they're highly unlikely to be appropriate in anything but the most unusual of circumstances and are highly likely to involve their own risks in their deployment.

Keep it simple.

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It is true that the reaction to most malfunctions is to get rid of the parachute, as others have said. Playing around with a real malfunction is an advanced topic and not recommended at lower experience levels.

At the same time. there are a broader range of what can be considered malfunctions, which may require different emergency procedures, even for novices. Part of the problem is that there's ambiguity in the word malfunction, whether it includes more minor, fixable issues, or just 'classic, real malfunctions of a deployed main parachute'. And whether the word is used to describe other unusual or emergency situations.

Responses to a malfunction / unusual situation will differ between each of the following:
a hard pull on the pilot chute, a pilot chute in tow, a pilot chute wrapped on your foot, a line twist, closed end cells, a line over, and a popped toggle, two-out side by side, and a hung slider.

This is true even for novices. The responses one takes will likely become more sophisticated between jump 1, jump 20, and jump 500.

All of these are malfunctions of a sort even if most are not a classic 'real' malfunction of a deployed main parachute.

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DougH

First, you need to have a very strong understanding of what your hard deck or decision altitude, and it is key that you have conversations with your instructors to evaluate that you are correctly interpreting this information.

The right information, understood the wrong way, can be dangerous. Websites and lists are notoriously inept when it comes to evaluating your understanding of critical concepts.



To go even further along these lines, your particular equipment will also influence how you deal with certain malfunctions, line twists being the primary one that I can think of. As a student, on a Navigator 260, pulling at 5500, you can probably kick out of even severe line twists (while maintaining altitude awareness) without any real issues. On a Comp Velo 84 pulling at 3000, you are probably going to chop line twists right away. That being said, when you are jumping that equipment you have the experience to evaluate the situation.

When you look for information on the internet, people will usually have their own built-in biases as to how they deal with situations based on their own equipment and experience. Seeking the advice of your instructors is therefore best. Even asking people around the dropzone can be dicey because they might consider 1500 to be their hard deck whilst you are more comfortable with 2000 or 2500.

Hence, make sure you are taking into account all of the variables that could affect your decision when coming up with your plan. Continue to evaluate your response to malfunctions anytime you jump a different piece of equipment as well.

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At 12 jumps, you should be going through a couple of malfunction scenarios to review them, before and/or after every coach jump, so there is no need to review all of them at once.

The only exception is that one time my student had to perform his EPs for real, nailed them, and I felt like we didn't need to review any more EP for that day.

LoL
I'm standing on the edge
With a vision in my head
My body screams release me
My dreams they must be fed... You're in flight.

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What DougH and everyone else above said. ;):)
The internet, with its dubious authenticity and lack of feedback, is a poor place to learn or review something so important.

I would like to say that I commend you on wanting to review your EPs. Get some refresher training from your instructor, then review your EPs daily, on your own. Decades of doing that have made my EPs part of my soul. ;)B|

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zcohen13

I'm a newer jumper (only 12 jumps) and want to go over the list of malfunctions again and what to do in those situations to possibly fix it before cutting away. Does anybody have a link to somewhere I can find this?



FJCs happen all the time, it shouldn't be a problem for you to sit in on one as a refresher.

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Lots of good advise above so that sort of disputes the idea that you can't learn from the internet. Your instructors can answer your questions as well. Thats their job.

When you first start out you will often think of the different scenarios of malfunction and what actions should be taken. Its natural because most people are nervous about how they would react to emergency situations.

If you practice your procedures, understand the different problems and the functions of your equipment. You should be good to go. As others have already stated altitude awareness is important.

I'd be embarrassed to talk about the number of reserve rides I have. But even so I was never under a reserve under 1500' and the usual reaction time from malfunction to reserve pull was never over five seconds. After more jumps you will become more confident in diagnosing problems and understanding the timeliness of problem diagnosis and action.

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