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worldsocold

wind down the guywire???What Do You Do???

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Not at you Calvin19 nor anybody directly. Headwind and tailwind openings affect the time it takes to get the canopy into an acceptable landing config on low jumps. On a low alt exit/opening, the canopy will be in a dive if one has a tailwind, penduluming out of the dive on a tailwind will burn a lot of alt. With a headwind opening one doesn't have this effect.
With short FFs or PCA/Staticlines, Winds have a major effect on everything to do with heading and landability.

Hope this helps.
take care,
space

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i totaly agree there space. !!


but what are your thoughts on opening altitude?
if we are talking about the ability to land the canopy running, then yeah, of course it takes longer with a tailwind, but i thought we were talking about the de-acceleration of the jumper for matters of verticle speed.

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ii thought we were talking about the de-acceleration of the jumper for matters of verticle speed.



This (jumper deceleration discussion) would be applicable to non modified rounds. A flying ramair canopy has velocity (speed and direction). Though both (non modified round/ramair canopy) open the same in their own deceleration mode due to the wind speed, Proximity to the ground becomes much more prominent if one does not have canopy recovery time for a flying canopy as opposed to a drag only canopy.
All parachutes open at the same angle to the relative wind.
take care,
space

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from 1000', if the landing area is good, a nice 6 can be taken. if everything is kosher, a nice 7.5 can be taken. at 6s, you're already near terminal (most likely near 100 mph). when reaching 8 to 10, there will be a sonic boom in freefall that is the true transition to terminal. the dynamics of freefall control change immensely after about 8 to 10 seconds. it's extremely dramatic dealing with the transition from subterminal (8-9 seconds) and 11 seconds. there is an explosion of wind and control.

aspects of base are much more difficult than most would imagine. short delays, medium delay, long delays, terminal delays, slider down, slider up, and differnt objects are completly differnt beast. be careful out there my friends and seek the knowledge to make you grow old and wise without too many injuries. wisdom comes from experience, but experience comes from mistakes...

-460
Looks like a death sandwich without the bread - Steve Deadman Morrell, BASE 174

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This was a post by Yuri in 2001 on Blinc.

Yo !

>"stronger the wind the higher necessity for the wind to perfectly bisect the wires"

This is a very common misunderstanding about antennas. Let's have a look:

The most dangerous condition is no wind at all (just when it feels so peaceful and safe...). After an off-heading opening you will be flying towards either of the wire sets at your canopy's speed in brakes.

Any wind down the wire is a much better case. If you open facing the downwind wire, you speed vector towards it is still your canopy's forward speed. If you open facing the upwind wire you are flying roughly at your canopy's speed minus the wind speed. Stronger the wind, safer you are. In a strong wind (at or above you canopy's speed) exiting almost parallel with the upwind wire (0..30 degrees off) gives you the most safety margin: 90..120 degrees free sector on the downwind side. The upwind off-heading is safe because you have no penetration and/or your canopy will be backing up. You will also open a bit further away from the downwind wire.

Obviously, the safest situation is a strong wind exactly between the wires.

Draw yourself a little picture with 3 lines at 120' angles representing the wires and 2 vectors representing speeds and directions of your canopy and the wind. Add these 2 vectors and everything will suddenly make sense. If their sum is pointing away from both wires no matter what direction is your canopy, you can throw a monkey off safely. Otherwise some prompt steering response will be required in case of an off-heading opening.

You must consider the wind at your opening altitude - NOT at your exit point. The wind will frequently turn as you climb up (usually to the right in the Northern hemisphere and to the left in Oz). Sometimes it turns enough to cross into another sector, and will be a big mistake to follow the wind and exit on the wrong side of the wire.

bsbd!

Yuri.
Looks like a death sandwich without the bread - Steve Deadman Morrell, BASE 174

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