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ibanfield

Reaching for the risers?

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With reference to a comment made in the thread about the recent fatality in Twin Falls, I'm just wondering what people think about reaching back for risers immediately after throwing the PC, pros/cons etc.

Ive recently done my first few BASE jumps and on all the jumps I automatically reached back for the risers after throwing the PC (as I do on a Skydive). My instructors told me this was fine but what do other people think?

Ive attached a frame grab from one of my jumps.

Cheers,

Ifan.
Face your fears, live your dreams.

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I started reaching for my risers right after pitching to help stop me dropping a shoulder.

Most of my jumps are in the low range with 0 - 2 sec delays, and I have not had issue, but I have to admit, Sabre210's comments have made me think about what I may do with delays longer than this. My gut feeling is that my body position is still rather boxed even with the immediate riser grab pitch, so I dont think extra drag on my legs are an issue for me.

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I always taught my students to not do this.
It makes it easier to get yourself in line-twists on opening. Think of how divers increase their rotation in the spin, they bring their arms in. The opposite to stop it, arms out. The same holds true for wrestlers, if they were to keep their arms in close to the body, it would be very easy for the opponent to flip them over. Arms and legs spread out to be more stable
NEVER GIVE UP!

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I feel it's a bad habit, especially to reach that far where you could potentially interfere with the opening or compromise your body position if you needed your arms for stability.
"The evil of the world is made possible by nothing but the sanction you give it. " -John Galt from Atlas Shrugged, 1957

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It certainly wasn't my intention to throw one of those 'oh it's black death' clouds over this technique. There's no doubt that it works for many many many people and you could argue easily that you can get control of the canopy quickly using this technique.

My comment really was just a thought relating to how you might compromise a more stable body position in the event that you have a serious hesitation.

Personally i don't use this technique as i feel it compromises how square my shoulder are during deployment. However i know of people who say that when they started doing this, it actively helped their heading performance.

Ultimately it's horses for courses, cos as with everything in BASE, one size doesn't fit all.

ian

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I do use this technique, mostly unconsciously at this point.

I've never felt that it compromised my heading performance or body position, although Lonnie's point about reducing your rotational inertia is well taken.

Another warning: I've sprained my thumb on 2 occasions reaching for the risers too fast (and having them slap across my hand). Be careful if you are doing this, and don't hit anything too far in advance.
-- Tom Aiello

Tom@SnakeRiverBASE.com
SnakeRiverBASE.com

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This is bad technique. Do not put your hands into the deploying canopy, risers, or lines. Keep your legs and arms apart to increase your moment of inertia and decrease the chance of a spin. Once you feel like you are getting into the saddle, thrust your head and arms back to get onto the situation.
Looks like a death sandwich without the bread - Steve Deadman Morrell, BASE 174

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I always stick my arms straight out after pitching for the sole reason that when my canopy is open my toggles/risers will be right by my hands, as opposed to reaching back to where my risers will not be in the next second.

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I like the point of staying wide and decreasing your inertia in the event of a spin up.

Although I've always been a reacher. Not back by the container though. I leave my hands near my ears, elbows out to the side. This way my risers usually end up right in my hands and I'm ready to deal with The perfect on heading openings I will always have.

Remember kids, always give your pals the reach-around.... they'll love ya for it.

"Faster, faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death."
Hunter S. Thompson

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I have also heard that keeping your hands out, as opposed to having them back, can help prevent you from going head low, as your hands/arms will catch more air.

Probably a minor thing, but something to think about.

I also, instinctively, reach back for my risers, almost immediately after pitching.

Have been trying to kick this habit though.
Education: that which reveals to the wise, and conceals from the stupid,
the vast limits of their knowledge. - Mark Twain

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I was taught not to reach after deployment but rather to re establish a stable , shoulders level 'box man' position after pitching ( and that seeing your hands/arms in your peripheral vision to the front&side of you may help that....)
I'm not a 'reacher' but can feel the moment my risers are free and have my hands on them early in deployment...
I have reckoned the risk of your hands getting slapped/entagled with a deploying riser by having them there ...before the riser deploys ....
isnt worth it compared to being able to have arms out ...helping your body position/symmetry and getting on the risers quickly as you feel your way through deployment...
How much benefit in canopy control is gained by having them on the rears so early in deployment....vs getting on them quicker a fraction later during deployment when feeling they are free ..?
Is there that much difference in being able to correct heading that early in the deployment sequence by having hands on the risers as soon as they they come off the container.....(but when the canopy has not even reached bottom skin inflation...) ...?

'I'm a Newbie alert' ...the above is my own opinion...nothing else

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It's kind of funny. I don't intentionally reach for my risers, as a matter of fact I've been told I'm not quite quick enough to my risers, but every picture I have show my hands near my shoulders prior to opening.

I've got to wonder if there is something else happening...

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Another warning: I've sprained my thumb on 2 occasions reaching for the risers too fast (and having them slap across my hand). Be careful if you are doing this, and don't hit anything too far in advance.



I second that ! Another sprained thumb here... So if you reach (I still do), don't reach too far too early.
http://www.ufufreefly.com

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looking at your picture i would say you should just trust your pack job more, throw the pilot-chute and leave it alone.
if in doubt adopt the body position shown in Zoters first picture whilst your parachute is deploying.
you have to be fast on the risers yes but when the canopy is deploying you need to occupy your mind with something else. perhaps go to your happy place, maybe pause to remember the smell of the promise of spring on a beautiful may morning or even the colour of golden leaves falling like fireworks on a still autumn evening, i find looking at the ground and smiling helps but please what ever you do don't shove your hands inside your container after throwing the pilot-chute because if you carry on doing it sooner or later its going to really hurt you. im a rigger so you can trust me..... yes really!!!. you're going mess up a beautiful pack job and when you destroy something beautiful only bad things can come of it.
my hovercraft is full of eels.

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Thanks guys for the tips, ill take take this in mind when hopefully I start BASE for real in the coming summer.

Just to let you know, all my jumps whilst reaching for the risers I also had perfect on heading openings.

Ive also attached a sequence of shots from one of my jumps.


Comments welcome.

Ifan.
Face your fears, live your dreams.

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I got tired of having my hands spanked with risers. I wait.



In your opinion,(or anyone else's) did the risers hitting your hands ever contribute to an off heading? Or is there too much energy in the system for riser strike to make a difference?
Get in - Get off - Get away....repeat as neccessary

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Last spring I blew my right toggle on a slider-down jump. I believe that I reached for my risers before opening, and consequently the riser slapped my hand in such a way that it knocked the toggle free. It is also possible that I had set it improperly and it would have blown anyway. That event has made me less aggressive about reaching for toggles.

The funny part was right before exit, I told Bill that my fortune cookie at lunch said that I would have an interesting day ;)

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