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Birdybirdy

WS pull alititude (experiance WS flyers)

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I would like to share something related to deployment altitude.

I have always flown a lightly loaded main canopy. Some of the time the winds, even at 3000 feet, might 40+ MPH which is hard for me to deal with under canopy. So 3000 feet or a bit lower is needed at times. I would rather not wait until 3000 feet to reach for my handle. So at 3700 or so I will get into my deployment position, legs folded, arms back, handle IN my hand, and just watch my chest mount altimeter until I hit the desired pitch altitude. At first I thought this was wise because I have the handle in hand high enough that there will be no missed “grab” at the desired lower deployment altitude. But as I did this more and more, in practice, I discovered I am much more calm and relaxed when I deploy, no matter how high I am.

I guess you could call it, “Hurry up and wait”. If I wait 2 seconds after I grab my hacky, I also have a chance to do another quick look around for others and to reassess my body position for deployment. My deployments have improved and my reaction to unexpected minor issues has also improved. This delay, for reassessment or longer (to burn off a few hundred extra feet) has become part of what is normal for me.
Instructor quote, “What's weird is that you're older than my dad!”

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dthames

I guess you could call it, “Hurry up and wait”. If I wait 2 seconds after I grab my hacky, I also have a chance to do another quick look around for others and to reassess my body position for deployment. My deployments have improved and my reaction to unexpected minor issues has also improved. This delay, for reassessment or longer (to burn off a few hundred extra feet) has become part of what is normal for me.



That's called "sinking out your deployments" and I did it for my first several hundred WS jumps and recommend it to anybody who wants more stability during opening. At some point I sort of subconsciously stopped doing it, plus it's harder on modern suits with more rigid legwings.
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I routinely pull below 3000 ft, and when I get the chance I'll dock at 3500 ft, then scary roll, then break off, and pull 2500ish ft. It doesn't take a lot of altitude to get plenty of separation in a small group.
Brian

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The111

***I guess you could call it, “Hurry up and wait”. If I wait 2 seconds after I grab my hacky, I also have a chance to do another quick look around for others and to reassess my body position for deployment. My deployments have improved and my reaction to unexpected minor issues has also improved. This delay, for reassessment or longer (to burn off a few hundred extra feet) has become part of what is normal for me.



That's called "sinking out your deployments" and I did it for my first several hundred WS jumps and recommend it to anybody who wants more stability during opening. At some point I sort of subconsciously stopped doing it, plus it's harder on modern suits with more rigid legwings.

How is THIS more stable? The horizontal flight of the wingsuit in its natural form with wings inflated and solid creates stability. It's designed to fly...you start "sinking out" and remove the air flow into your wings you now have slack and the wingsuit is no longer flying. on top of this you CHANGE your normal wingsuit pull b/c you have a higher chance of having wing in the way of your hackey. I would call this inefficiency and instability.

Safety issues will occur in bigger ways as well...if 5 of us are flying together and you "sink out" your deployment, i am now flying through your deployment altitude and then pitching instead of flying past you as you deploy.
IHYD

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Quote

I would call this inefficiency and instability.



When thinking of big suits, perhaps.
But when looking at smaller wingsuits, a collapsed pull position thats held for a few seconds will create a smooth airflow around the body as well. And the size of the wing on beginner/intermediate sized suits is not an issue when pulling in collapsed state.

And compared to the results from potential asymmetry that people with lower experience can encounter when going for a full flight pull, its for sure a more efficient pull position (collapsed).

On bigger suits, a full flight pull becomes an easier option (as usually, though not always, that upsizing comes together with more experience as well). But for anything small/intermediate, a normal collapse will guarantee better symmetry.

As to flying past people when deploying, perhaps separating 500 ft earlier and making sure that deploying bodies aren't that close to one and another is a safer option as well. But thats being a bit more being a comedian than safety naziB|:P
JC
FlyLikeBrick
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mccordia

Quote

I would call this inefficiency and instability.



When thinking of big suits, perhaps.
But when looking at smaller wingsuits, a collapsed pull position thats held for a few seconds will create a smooth airflow around the body as well. And the size of the wing on beginner/intermediate sized suits is not an issue when pulling in collapsed state.

And compared to the results from potential asymmetry that people with lower experience can encounter when going for a full flight pull, its for sure a more efficient pull position (collapsed).

On bigger suits, a full flight pull becomes an easier option (as usually, though not always, that upsizing comes together with more experience as well). But for anything small/intermediate, a normal collapse will guarantee better symmetry.

As to flying past people when deploying, perhaps separating 500 ft earlier and making sure that deploying bodies aren't that close to one and another is a safer option as well. But thats being a bit more being a comedian than safety naziB|:P



Thanks for the perspective =D. I will still argue the issue of your arm wing getting in the way of a pull, even in a small suit. not nearly as drastic no, but even that little gripper on the phantom 2 can get in the way.

as for your humor, I'm setting up a nice little fly by if you do that with me on the load :)
IHYD

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