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Low Pass Stories...

 

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usedtajump  (D 6813)

Feb 26, 2004, 2:11 PM
Post #26 of 113 (1492 views)
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Re: [steve1] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Was walking on the promanade deck on a cruise ship in the Baltic Sea in 2001 and a German Luftwaffe Tornado came by in afterburner about eye level. Damned impressive.Laugh


(This post was edited by usedtajump on Feb 26, 2004, 2:13 PM)


Nutz  (D License)

Feb 26, 2004, 3:03 PM
Post #27 of 113 (1482 views)
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Re: [JohnRich] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
While climbing Mt. Picacho, that sharp peak just south of Eloy, AZ, I was on a narrow mountain trail, just below the summit. Two Marine AV8A Harriers blew by right over the top of the peak, making a hell of a racket, at high speed. Their appearance was so sudden, having approached from the oposite side of the peak from me, and the noise so sudden, loud and unexpected, it nearly scared me off the side of the mountain. I think the pilots use that peak as a landmark on their way back to Yuma, just as the early wagon trains did.

Man. I love harriers but they are LOUD. I was working on Luke Air Force range on the other side of the mountain from Yuma and they used to come by, shoot a target with a sidewinder and then come back and hover to see if they hit it. Also, if you have your back to them and they sneak up on you about 50' off the deck about 600 mph, it is very shocking to say the least. (You may need to change your pants.)
Crazy


AirCav  (D 3888)

Feb 26, 2004, 5:15 PM
Post #28 of 113 (1471 views)
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Re: [murrays] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Quote:....I think that a Twin Beech firewalled close to the ground is the most awesome buzz job machine. The engines just seem louder and they just seem to be going faster than a DC-3...don't know if that's the case but that's how I always felt.
-------------------------------------------------------------
How about four...sorry about the quality of the pic but you can imagine the roar
Attachments: beech's buzz001.jpg (8.52 KB)


chuteless  (D 41)

Feb 26, 2004, 5:23 PM
Post #29 of 113 (1466 views)
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Re: [AirCav] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

I wonder if anyone got a film or video of it....what a great shot.

Bill Cole


AirCav  (D 3888)

Feb 26, 2004, 5:45 PM
Post #30 of 113 (1464 views)
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Re: [chuteless] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Sorry, no video back then, days of 16 millimeter films.Smile


murrays  (C 1285)

Feb 26, 2004, 6:31 PM
Post #31 of 113 (1456 views)
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Re: [chuteless] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
I diidnt know Horst was dead. How did that happen??

Bill Cole

Bill,

He died of hypothermia in July or August 1985 (I think)...in Auyuituq (sp) National Park on Baffin Island. Horst flew his Moonie up there...all by himself. he went hiking in the park...all by himself. Gutsy as hell. Nobody knows exactly what happened but it is assumed that he was fording a stream, fell in, lost all his gear and got extremely chilled. He came upon a group of French hikers in a shelter in the park. He was incoherent and severelt chilled. They put him in a sleeping bag to warm him up. He woke up once and complained of pain. He was given some aspirins. He went back to sleep and died in his sleep.

I don't understand the physiology of hypothermia but I do know that when you get severe hypothermia you really need a Dr. or hospital. It's pretty difficult to treat in the middle of nowhere.

He had planned this trip for several years....with his usual Austrian thoroughness....and although it came to a tragic end I can't think of a more majestic place to die.

Horst was a great pilot and a great guy. Sad to lose him when he was in his early forties.


chuteless  (D 41)

Feb 26, 2004, 6:36 PM
Post #32 of 113 (1455 views)
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Re: [murrays] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

All I can say is WOW!!!

I didnt know about this, and I agree, it is too too bad.

I jumped with Horst, and he was good in freefall.

WOW!!!!

Almost 20 yrs after....WOW!

Bill Cole


Beerlight

Feb 26, 2004, 7:40 PM
Post #33 of 113 (1445 views)
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Re: [murrays] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Not to get off the subject, but if someone's body temp gets low enough, you must use an external heat source to bring them back.

Sticking a cold body into a sleeping bag doesn't work. It's like sticking a bag of ice in there. sleeping bag doesn't work for a too cold body.

When I went to Arctic Survival school in AK, we were taught to get naked (no, I wasn't in the Navy), with the hypo individual, body to body, and warm them. Putting their extremities into either your belly or under arm.......

Buck


(This post was edited by Beerlight on Feb 26, 2004, 7:47 PM)


Premier PhreeZone  (D License)
Moderator
Feb 26, 2004, 8:19 PM
Post #34 of 113 (1438 views)
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Re: [AirCav] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Impressive! Towards the hanger too... even more impressive. Jim in the lead Beech by chance?


prost  (D 24959)

Feb 26, 2004, 8:40 PM
Post #35 of 113 (1434 views)
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Re: [PhreeZone] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Nothing like getting a buzz job by a plane that is at the same time breaking the sound barrier. If you have ever had this experience then you know why breaking the sound barrier is illegal over the US.


murrays  (C 1285)

Feb 26, 2004, 9:30 PM
Post #36 of 113 (1424 views)
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Re: [Beerlight] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:

Not to get off the subject, but if someone's body temp gets low enough, you must use an external heat source to bring them back.

Sticking a cold body into a sleeping bag doesn't work. It's like sticking a bag of ice in there. sleeping bag doesn't work for a too cold body.

When I went to Arctic Survival school in AK, we were taught to get naked (no, I wasn't in the Navy), with the hypo individual, body to body, and warm them. Putting their extremities into either your belly or under arm.......

Buck

I believe that even that might not work if the person is cold enough. Check out this article. Unfortunately for Horst, the people that were in the shelter didn't even know to do what you are saying. Severe hypothermia is difficult to treat. I learned some basic information when I was into ocean kayaking in British Columbia...enough to know that I never wanted to get that chilled....so I always wore protective clothing, learned to roll and so on to prevent myself from swimming in that cold ocean.


mccurley  (E 663)

Feb 27, 2004, 2:25 AM
Post #37 of 113 (1411 views)
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Re: [murrays] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Here's the proof of the beach at Gananoque. Art Kitchen I think was the pilot and going the opposite direction of Murry's discription after shotting the gap in the tree line.
I was on my belly with the camera propped up on my elbows and the blur in the picture to the bottom right is from a blade of grass. With this information and the angle of view to the Beach, you make your on call on altitude?


mccurley  (E 663)

Feb 27, 2004, 2:28 AM
Post #38 of 113 (1409 views)
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Re: [mccurley] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Opps the photo didn't load. it's over the max 60 k limit. It was previousl posted on last years photo contest if you,d like to look.


murrays  (C 1285)

Feb 27, 2004, 7:13 AM
Post #39 of 113 (1381 views)
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Re: [mccurley] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Great shot Steve! (Steve e-mailed it to me and I shrank it a bit) Shot is attached here...
Attachments: mccurley-500.jpg (49.3 KB)


winsor  (D 13715)

Feb 27, 2004, 8:36 AM
Post #40 of 113 (1363 views)
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Re: [faulknerwn] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
My favorite low pass was the jet at Quincy one year. It wasn't the lowest I've ever seen, but seeing a 727 jet fly quite low over all the tents and everything else was spectacular!

W

I'd rate the Constellation's as better.

When the old geezers flying the Connie were leaving, a bunch of people lined up between Manifest and the loading tents to moon the pilots as they flew over. A bunch of people, seeing the Connie from between their legs - coming at them at deck level - hit the deck.

If anyone has video of it, it was absolutely awesome. The tents were in danger of being sliced by props, and if the gear had been extended I'm convinced they would have hit the ground and various combinations of people, tents and vehicles.

It's easy to forget that the old codgers flying that plane had cut their teeth on B-24s and the like, flying missions through clouds of flak and Messerschmits. When they were youngsters, every flight was a near-death experience.

The next year the FAA was on hand, and the low pass was pretty tame. Those guys are crazy, but not stupid.


Blue skies,

Winsor


winsor  (D 13715)

Feb 27, 2004, 8:46 AM
Post #41 of 113 (1358 views)
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Re: [BlueSBDeath] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
Hey John, I do know this happend in SC, not sure what year, but it was in Barnwell. Low-pass, sad day, at least one death.Frown

After a "mile high" flight on the couple's wedding night, the pilot made a pass in front of the DZ.

A bunch of the guys had gone out to moon the plane when it made the low pass. They didn't know that the pilot intended to make a bounce-and-go on the taxiway before coming around to land.

The 182's landing light did not illuminate the unfortunate pranksters until it was too late to avoid them.

One of the people on the ground saw the plane coming, realized what was happening, and flattened. He wound up with a broken humerus from the main gear running over his arm.

Another of the people on the ground was not as fortunate, and was hit by the propeller.

The pilot, in shock, took the plane around and managed to land it safely. The prop was damaged, and the plane was shaking badly.

IIRC, it was in 1991. It still hurts.


Blue skies,

Winsor


(This post was edited by winsor on Feb 27, 2004, 8:47 AM)


jgc372

Feb 27, 2004, 9:06 AM
Post #42 of 113 (1344 views)
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Re: [winsor] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Two of the best low passes I ever saw first at a rehearsal for the St. Catherines Ontario Air Show in the early seventies when the RAF Red Arows got a warning form the tower about their first low pass, on the next one everyone in the control tower hit the floor and as I recall there were some broken windows.

The next one was at an Air Show at London ,Ontario when a F4 was supposed to do a pass at .98 Mach and instead
went slightly over at about one hundred feet


winsor  (D 13715)

Feb 27, 2004, 9:13 AM
Post #43 of 113 (1341 views)
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Re: [steve1] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

In 1971 the second battalion of the 509th jumped into Italy near Aviano to take part in some war game type activity with our Italian counterparts. Good clean fun.

After we had gone through our tactical activities, we staged for transport back to the Italian base, on top of flatlands adjacent to a wide river valley. The Americans and Italians were in groups, maybe 100 meters apart and 100 meters from the abrupt edge of the dropoff to the valley below.

As we hung out waiting for our rides, we watched some Italian F-100s working out on a nearby range, performing textbook strafing runs. Very impressive.

After a while the Super Sabres left.

Both the Americans and Italians were then stunned by the appearance of a USAF F-4 Phantom II at deck height. He had snuck up on us by flying along the river bed somehow, and didn't give a lot of room as he split the difference between the American and Italian formations, going to afterburner close enough to the ground to leave foliage smoking.

He hung around for about 20 minutes, performing acts of aerial skill that left us jaw-agape. He would rocket into clouds and then reappear from the riverbed again (I thought it was the same plane, but it could have been a few of them screwing with us, now that I think of it) sometimes coming over at speed and others times with everything out at what seemed the brink of a stall.

I really can't do justice to just how awesome was that impromptu airshow, but there was no doubt that the goal was a margin of error of zero.

Before leaving Italy we watched the Phantoms doing a standard departure from Aviano, where they would take off in full afterburner and immediately crank a 90 degree turn into a knife-edge entry to a narrow valley. Two weeks later, Stars and Stripes reported the loss of an F-4 at Aviano in the mountains immediately after takeoff, and there was no doubt in any of our minds that one of them had been doing what we watched and had an engine hiccup, since that was all that it would have taken.

Those were some interesting times.


Blue skies,

Winsor


jgc372

Feb 27, 2004, 9:16 AM
Post #44 of 113 (1338 views)
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Re: [chuteless] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Bill

Seeing Horst,s name reminded me of when he did a low pass at the old P.A.T. DZ at Damascas and missed the windsock beside the packing area by about a foot when he had the Piper Super Cub.

Where is your brother Harry These days?


chuteless  (D 41)

Feb 27, 2004, 9:26 AM
Post #45 of 113 (1336 views)
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Re: [winsor] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Thats a great story....and reminds me that this thing went on during the First World war.

A French pilot (Charles Nugesser) had downed several German aircraft, and thought he would celebrate his victory. He flew right down the street between the buildings ( I think the town was named Nancy) and the civilians there were very upset.

The mayor of the town went to see Nungesser's Commanding Officer and complained about the danger.

When Nungesser returned to his base, he was extremely ripped up and down by the C.O., who finally told him, you save that kind of flying to do it over the german held territory.

Nungesser went out and had his Nieuport 17 re-armed, re-fueled, and hit off for the German lines. He had a couple of friends fly with him, but they were to fly slow around the edge, while Nungesser did his thing.

He proceeded to put on a one man air show over a German aerodrome, and looped, rolled and low passed the field, without a single shot being fired at him

The Germans were in awe of his flying and left him alone. Perhaps his friends had something to do wit that.

Nungesser won the Croix de Guerre 28 times (France's version of the Medal of Honor)

After the war, Nungesser an a friend Coli, flew from France to America, and crashed in the State of Maine. They actually beat Lindburgh, but it was years before it was confirmed they had actually made it in their all wood aircraft Le Oiseau Blanc. The wheels stayed on the ground after he took off, in case he had to ditch inthe water.


Bill Cole D-41


airtwardo  (D License)

Feb 27, 2004, 10:25 AM
Post #46 of 113 (1322 views)
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Re: [chuteless] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

In the 70's, at the little 'private' parachute club
I jumped with...
We had a grass strip, small clubhouse and a pea pit
out in the middle of Illinois farm country...
miles from anywhere.

I had about a hundred jumps at the time,
there were about 15 of us packing on the grass
next to the peas one hot August Saturday.

Corn was high so you really couldn't see much...
I hear this "Whoosh" in the distance but can't tell
what it is or from where it's coming.

A heartbeat later this Lear Jet
SCREAMS over the peas at 10 feet above the
corn tassels, must have been doing .8!

Everyone there is diving onto their 1/2 packed,
open canopies...Shocked

Except me of course! Unsure
Took me about 2.5 seconds to figure out why,
that's when the 'wind' caught up to where the
Lear had just been!!!

One of the club members worked at an FBO
that did repair work on Lears...
when he had a chance
to take one up solo now and then...
it was off to buzz the guys! CoolCoolCool


JohnRich  (D License)

Feb 27, 2004, 10:40 AM
Post #47 of 113 (1318 views)
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Re: [airtwardo] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Another story, from many years ago. But I'm not going to say where this occured, because the DZ operator might be watching this thread...

The aircraft was a Dehaviland Beaver, making a low pass over the skydivers. This was an open air DZ, with everyone just packing in the grass.

The Beaver makes his high speed low pass over parked cars, and everyone hears a loud "THWACK" sound. But nothing seems to be amiss.

The Beaver lands, and there is a dent in the leading edge of the wing.

In the parking lot, a truck owned by one of the skydiver's has a very tall ham radio type whip antennae, sticking up about 10 feet in the air. The top of the antennae is bent into the exact shape of the leading edge of a Beaver wing...


(This post was edited by JohnRich on Feb 27, 2004, 10:42 AM)


JohnRich  (D License)

Feb 27, 2004, 10:46 AM
Post #48 of 113 (1312 views)
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Re: [JohnRich] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Yet another story, again from many years ago. And again, I'm not going to say where this occurred. The aircraft was a Dehaviland Beaver, but this was a different DZ from the previous "Beaver" story I told.

The DZ pickup truck was out in the airport area picking up jumpers that had landed out around the runway. The pilot brought the Beaver in for a low pass over the truck.

But he got a little too low, and hit the cab of the truck with one wheel of the landing gear. The wheel sheared off and was left sticking in the roof of the truck.

The pilot had to land without one wheel.

No one hurt, miraculously.


chuteless  (D 41)

Feb 27, 2004, 10:48 AM
Post #49 of 113 (1311 views)
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Re: [steve1] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

Back in the mid 1960s, a bunch of jumpers were taking part in the canadian Intnl Air Show at the Toronto waterfront. During the briefing, I got friendly with the pilot of the Red Knight T-33 jet, and I asked If there was anyway I could get a ride. He said sure, come to Trentton with me tomorrow, and well attend the briefin here and return here. There was an alternate Red Knight with a shiny silver T-33. My brother conned him for a ride, and the next day, Saturday, we flew to Trenton Air base and returned.

On the way back, we ask the pilots to buzz the dropzone. We came in over the field, and not a single jumper was there

What a disappointment. I guess you win some and lose some.


Bill Cole


SkydiverRick  (D 13360)

Feb 27, 2004, 12:41 PM
Post #50 of 113 (1291 views)
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Re: [Beerlight] Low Pass Stories... [In reply to] Can't Post

 
Last one: Our DZO used to love buzz jobs.
Was this a dz in Texas?


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