Forums: Skydiving: Safety and Training:
Licenses

 


skreamer

Apr 3, 2001, 12:16 PM
Post #1 of 9 (1064 views)
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Licenses Can't Post

I have just aquired my BPA A-license. My question is the following : If you have a BPA A-license could you then go for a USPA B license? More importantly could one get the USPA D-license after 200 jumps if all your previous licenses were BPA?

I am asking this, because i could imagine quite a few people preferring to get a USPA D-license to a (1 000 jump requirement) BPA D-license.

I am not too far off my B-license (as far as jumps are concerned), and 100 jumps for a C-license (200 for BPA) seems attainable, but the thought of having to spend about 6 active years in the sport for my D-license (health and budget permitting) seems a bridge too far.

So, what are the regulations for crossing over between different authorities for licenses?

/s

[drop till you party!]


Zennie

Apr 3, 2001, 12:31 PM
Post #2 of 9 (1036 views)
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Someone who knows more about this correct me if I'm wrong, but USPA doesn't require you to progress from A - D. You can go straight to a D (or whatever) as long as you meet the jump & accuracy requirements and pass the written test.

I don't know about reciprocity between different licensing organizations. I also don't know if you can be a non-US-resident and be a member of USPA (anyone?), which is a prerequisite to a USPA license.

So I guess my advice would be to keep going through your BPA licenses until you get to 1000 jumps and then join USPA and apply for a USPA D. You might want to take a look at the accuracy & other requirements for the D so that you'll have those locked up by the time you hit jump #1000.

After you get pied, take the written test and you should be good to go. Wink


------------
Blue Skies!

Zennie


Geoff

Apr 3, 2001, 12:36 PM
Post #3 of 9 (1035 views)
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you can be a non-US resident USPA member. I am.





skreamer

Apr 3, 2001, 12:56 PM
Post #4 of 9 (1028 views)
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Re: Licenses [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
keep going through your BPA licenses until you get to 1000 jumps and then join USPA and apply for a USPA D.
Huh? That makes absolutely no sense. If I had a 1 000 jumps then I would just get my BPA D-license anyway, so why bother making 1 000 jumps and then applying for a license you could have got after only 200 jumps???

/s

[drop till you party!]


skreamer

Apr 3, 2001, 1:00 PM
Post #5 of 9 (1026 views)
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Re: Licenses [In reply to] Can't Post

Geoff

What are the requirements to get a non-resident USPA license? ie is it OK if most of your jumps are made here but you are a member of the USPA? Are you a member of both? (can you even be a member of both?).

Have you encountered any problems here or abroad because of your non-US USPA membership? What would you advise somebody in my positon (A-license nearing B requirements)?

Sorry for the many questions, but I am quite curious about this (shouldn't the FAI standardize license requirements or is it out of their jurisdiction?)

/s

[drop till you party!]


Stacy  (D License)

Apr 3, 2001, 2:47 PM
Post #6 of 9 (1006 views)
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YOu can apply for the USPA license, I'm pretty sure that you just have to meet the requirements and take the written tests.. but beyond that BPA and USPA work with cross overs a lot.

Stacy
http://astro.temple.edu/~sweeks


miked10270  (D 10270)

Apr 3, 2001, 4:09 PM
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Hi skreamer,

Short version is that you can get a USPA license or award if you fulfill their req's... One of which being that you're either a current USPA member "OR" are a temporary USPA member "AND" a full member of another country's governing body.

At least, that's "MY" reading of the relevant bits of the USPA rules & constitution.

Regardless of this, can i ask what the lure of a "D" license is? Nowadays the FAI (BPA) "D" license means nothing except a lot of jumps! The "A" signifies qualification, the "B" allows you to JM & signifies experience, the "C" lets you jump with a soft helmet & move into instruction, what does the "D" let you do??Frown

IMHO the FAI(BPA) "D" license signifys nothing more than that you've done loads of jumps... The "C" is the one to aim for.

Just my $0.02,

Mike D10270 (yeah... I know...).



Zennie

Apr 3, 2001, 4:56 PM
Post #8 of 9 (996 views)
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I think the D lets you do record attempts and some demo jumps. Other demo jumps require a PRO rating.

You can instruct on a C? I thought you needed a D for that.

------------
Blue Skies!

Zennie

<FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Zennie on 4/3/01 04:57 PM.</EM></FONT>


Geoff

Apr 4, 2001, 12:01 AM
Post #9 of 9 (971 views)
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You can be a member of both - I am and lots of people are.
Never had a problem due to non-residency (don't think they care as long as you pay the fee), but I get my membership mainly for the magazine, plus then I don't need to take out the temporary membership when visiting the USA.

My licences are BPA - I don't even have a USPA A licence, I'm just a USPA member.

If you're based in the UK, I suggest you follow the BPA licence route until C licence - that lets you do most things e.g. become an instructor, jump camera, wear a frap hat, do demos, even skysurf (there are extra requirements here, but not a D licence) etc. You only need the D licence if you want to become a CCI (Club Chief Instructor).

Once you've got your 200, if you're hungry for a D licence, you could check up on the extra requirements for the USPA D (night jumps, written test etc.), maybe go to the US on vacation and get checked out. You'll need USPA membership to do this.

You may be able to find a USPA instructor in the UK to check you out - there are a few around. I know that Chris Allen (BPA chairman) is or was a USPA instructor.

Check out http://www.uspa.org/ for the detailed requierements.

The FAI does standardise the minimum requirements for the licences, but the precise requirements are up to the national bodies, so they're effectively different everywhere.

Hope that helps

Geoff




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