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UK - who pays for training after an A licence?

 


rss_v

Jul 18, 2012, 2:03 AM
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UK - who pays for training after an A licence? Can't Post

Hi. Obviously the initial cost of skydiving training is well-defined by the DZ and you know what you're getting for the money. But then after the AFF, or whatever, is all done and you've got an A licence, how is it meant to work? Through the BPA we need CH2 and JM1 certifications to get a B licence, and both of these require at least some input from an instructor. JM1 in particular requires ground- and plane-based training. In addition, there are things like being taught how to pack which take up a lot of someone's time when they could be packing for money or doing jumps.

Who pays for these things and how does the instructor get paid for it? I've never seen a sort of price list or had anything mentioned to me. Do I expect these things for free if/when an instructor has some pare time (never) or do I need to cough up some money and pin them down to a particular time so I have their undivided (as if!) attention?

I'm keen to make every visit to the DZ count and I want to learn how to pack really right away now, and get started on JM1 instruction as soon as is appropriate.

Thanks!


Jalien  (A License)

Jul 18, 2012, 4:14 AM
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Re: [rss_v] UK - who pays for training after an A licence? [In reply to] Can't Post

It varies between dropzones, and between people, and depending on the weather...

Most DZs will do packing courses, which have a fee (30-50), and I think you can expect to get a day of focused tuition and progress towards your packing cert for this. Otherwise, you can try to collar an experienced packer on a quietish day and ask them to show you how to pack; they may well be too busy packing though!

Regarding briefs for CH2, JM1 etc, I think that most DZ instructors actively want people to progress, they are just pretty busy quite often - if you can find a small group of people that need the same brief, then it will make sense for them to give the brief to everyone all at once. Again, quieter days are better I imagine. Also, some DZs do progression weekends, where the focus is on getting the briefs necessary for certain licences.

I've just started working through my CH2 stuff, and my impression is that you just have to put yourself forward and ask for stuff - it's a bit different from student status in that the impetus is on you to seek out progression, rather than being told what to do next. However it's probably not a good idea to pester the instructors constantly when they're busy chasing around with 100 tandems etc!

As I say, I've only just started on this road too, so others may have a different perspective Smile

[edit to add: I don't think there are many formal fees involved for things like ground briefs, as the instructors are generally at the DZ "on duty" and being paid for being there, but I could be wrong!]


(This post was edited by Jalien on Jul 18, 2012, 4:17 AM)


rss_v

Jul 18, 2012, 4:35 AM
Post #3 of 5 (925 views)
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Re: [Jalien] UK - who pays for training after an A licence? [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
It varies between dropzones, and between people, and depending on the weather...

Most DZs will do packing courses, which have a fee (30-50), and I think you can expect to get a day of focused tuition and progress towards your packing cert for this. Otherwise, you can try to collar an experienced packer on a quietish day and ask them to show you how to pack; they may well be too busy packing though!

Regarding briefs for CH2, JM1 etc, I think that most DZ instructors actively want people to progress, they are just pretty busy quite often - if you can find a small group of people that need the same brief, then it will make sense for them to give the brief to everyone all at once. Again, quieter days are better I imagine. Also, some DZs do progression weekends, where the focus is on getting the briefs necessary for certain licences.

I've just started working through my CH2 stuff, and my impression is that you just have to put yourself forward and ask for stuff - it's a bit different from student status in that the impetus is on you to seek out progression, rather than being told what to do next. However it's probably not a good idea to pester the instructors constantly when they're busy chasing around with 100 tandems etc!

As I say, I've only just started on this road too, so others may have a different perspective Smile

[edit to add: I don't think there are many formal fees involved for things like ground briefs, as the instructors are generally at the DZ "on duty" and being paid for being there, but I could be wrong!]

Thanks. I've just seen that Hibaldstow have a JM1/CH2 day next week, and a packing course the day after. 10 and 25, respectively - not bad.


adamUK  (C 104423)

Jul 18, 2012, 6:48 AM
Post #4 of 5 (896 views)
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Re: [rss_v] UK - who pays for training after an A licence? [In reply to] Can't Post

I didn't pay a thing at Peterlee. Just a few beers and several cups of tea but it's a pretty informal place. Smile


Deisel  (D 31661)

Jul 18, 2012, 7:25 PM
Post #5 of 5 (770 views)
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Re: [rss_v] UK - who pays for training after an A licence? [In reply to] Can't Post

First off - keep the great positive attitude. It will pay huge dividendsWink
As an instructor (in the US) I'll say that anytime I'm sitting around drinking coffee cause we aint jumpin is a good time for teaching! Personally (and I'm in the minority), I teach packing for free. And I will do ground prep or review until the student is comfortable. I will discuss spotting, winds aloft, canopy flight, exit seperation, or any other abstract concept for hours - all at no charge.

But please understand that any full time skydiver that earns a living from jumping (I don't) would be a fool to ignore a paying customer in favor of shooting the breeze about sky jumpin. It doesn't make them a bad instructor, just people with bills to pay. Bottom line is talk to people. If they know that you are hungry for info, they will teach you. Anytime I know that someone hanging about needs to cover a certain topic I'll seek them out if I'm covering it with someone else.

And if you're not sure, offer a tip. Some will refuse and some will accept. Again, I'm in the US but I can't see it working much different in the UK.

D



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