Forums: Skydiving: Safety and Training:
elderly skydivers

 

First page Previous page 1 2 3 Next page Last page  View All

nigel99  (D 1)

May 28, 2012, 5:39 PM
Post #1 of 71 (4438 views)
Shortcut
elderly skydivers Can't Post

A couple of years ago I broke the fatalaties down by age and was surprised that the over 50s contibuted about 30%.

As health problems, sucu as heart disease affect older people more, at what age should jumpers consider regular checkups?

I suspect the recent Oz fatality was health related, based on the news reports. There was also the South African one in the last couple of months.

I am approaching 40 and decided that I would have a heart stress test every 2 years after the South Afrcan death. I've often been asked why I am out of breath after a jump and the incident prompted me to get a checkup. Fortunately in my case I discovered that I have excersize induced asthma and a $5 puffer has literally changed my life. Really wish I had known 20 years ago...


moggybean  (C License)

May 28, 2012, 5:51 PM
Post #2 of 71 (4408 views)
Shortcut
Re: [nigel99] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

A good friend of mine is 70 in just over a month and still skydives. Yes he does take things a bit slower, but has check-ups regularly. I just hope that I am in the same position as him when I am his age.

He's a pretty good skydiver too Cool


riggerrob  (D 14840)

May 28, 2012, 9:02 PM
Post #3 of 71 (4342 views)
Shortcut
Re: [nigel99] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

Chewing gum is an even cheaper solution to exercise-induced asthma.


mjosparky  (D 5476)

May 28, 2012, 9:04 PM
Post #4 of 71 (4341 views)
Shortcut
Re: [nigel99] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

It is a great idea to have regular check up regardless of age. Also regular exercise can make a difference. But you have to take it case by case. Never sell old guys short.

Age and treachery will beat youth and skill every time

Sparky
Attachments: Terry-C-Weatherford-SOS-0089.jpg (126 KB)


nigel99  (D 1)

May 28, 2012, 9:14 PM
Post #5 of 71 (4336 views)
Shortcut
Re: [mjosparky] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
It is a great idea to have regular check up regardless of age. Also regular exercise can make a difference. But you have to take it case by case. Never sell old guys short.

Age and treachery will beat youth and skill every time

Sparky

I'm certainly not trying to undermine old guys. It does seem that with age a new/different set of problems arise and most people aren't aware of their new limits. My grandfather stopped driving at 70 as he did not want the indignity of someone having to take his car keys away (something he had been forced to do on a few occasions). I am guessing the same principle applies.


skyjumpenfool  (Student)

May 29, 2012, 6:49 AM
Post #6 of 71 (4225 views)
Shortcut
Re: [nigel99] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

Should I be concered here? Tongue


Abedy  (D 10153)

May 29, 2012, 12:01 PM
Post #7 of 71 (4119 views)
Shortcut
Re: [nigel99] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
Fortunately in my case I discovered that I have excersize induced asthma and a $5 puffer has literally changed my life. Really wish I had known 20 years ago...

I have both exercise-induced and allergen-induced asthma but in my case I have never had to use my puffer at the DZ. But cases are different and I take one dose of my turbohaler (powder) every morning. (Lowest dosage possible, works great with me.)

BTW: Have you been shown how to use it correctly? (I bet you have... just in case. It's shown in a totally wrong way in many (American) movies.)

I started with a thorough medical inspection by an aviation physician because of my asthma. She did some checks, asked whether my medication was regulated correctly and then told me: Son, yer test results are bl00dy good, better than any average smoker, and probably better than any untrained "normal" folks. Cool
Being a TI I have to undergo a medical check every three years, so I think I'm being monitored quite well. Additionally I do sports several times a week (nah, additionally to skydiving Wink) so I guess that sort of explains RR 125/80 at 60 bpm plus a smile of my young doctress^T doctor every time she stethoscopes me. Hah, I coined a verb? AngelicCool


(This post was edited by Abedy on May 29, 2012, 12:14 PM)


Rover  (D 241)

May 30, 2012, 2:37 AM
Post #8 of 71 (4021 views)
Shortcut
Re: [nigel99] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

Who give a fuck? You gotta die of something! Wink


(This post was edited by Rover on May 30, 2012, 2:41 AM)


ixlr82  (C 33491)

May 30, 2012, 11:21 PM
Post #9 of 71 (3918 views)
Shortcut
Re: [nigel99] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

I think it's a pretty valid question. I was on a jump with a 65 plus age jumper who landed on an aad fire and was found dead moments later. Since then I have followed the forums and noticed several similar circumstances. Jumper 'appeared' normal until breakoff. Next thing anybody knew, jumper landed unresponsive under an aad fired reserve or went in with nothing out. In Pauls case it was massive coronary failure. I suspect similar problems with recent cases. (And I know of one that survived-Bob W. are you reading this?)
Of course, it is up to DZO's what they want to do. But many of us are getting older in the sport and I think you will see even more of this. Skydiving is intensely fun but seriously demanding on the heart.


obelixtim  (D 84)

May 31, 2012, 12:12 AM
Post #10 of 71 (3911 views)
Shortcut
Re: [Rover] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

 As the saying goes...

"I want to die like my grandad, peacefully in my sleep....unlike his passengers, screaming in the back seat".


DaVinciflies

May 31, 2012, 3:19 AM
Post #11 of 71 (3892 views)
Shortcut
Re: [Rover] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
Who give a fuck? You gotta die of something! Wink

Might as well be swooping!


popsjumper  (D 999999999)

May 31, 2012, 7:46 AM
Post #12 of 71 (3863 views)
Shortcut
Re: [DaVinciflies] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
In reply to:
Who give a fuck? You gotta die of something! Wink

Might as well be swooping!

I'd prefer in bed...with your wife.
LaughLaughTongue


airtwardo  (D License)

May 31, 2012, 8:28 AM
Post #13 of 71 (3845 views)
Shortcut
Re: [popsjumper] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
In reply to:
In reply to:
Who give a fuck? You gotta die of something! Wink

Might as well be swooping!

I'd prefer in bed...with your wife.
LaughLaughTongue


...AND her two sisters! Angelic


nigel99  (D 1)

May 31, 2012, 7:40 PM
Post #14 of 71 (3744 views)
Shortcut
Re: [popsjumper] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
In reply to:
In reply to:
Who give a fuck? You gotta die of something! Wink

Might as well be swooping!

I'd prefer in bed...with your wife.
LaughLaughTongue

Jeez Andy, didn't know you wanted to get shot. Tongue


popsjumper  (D 999999999)

May 31, 2012, 9:57 PM
Post #15 of 71 (3724 views)
Shortcut
Re: [nigel99] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
In reply to:
In reply to:
In reply to:
Who give a fuck? You gotta die of something! Wink

Might as well be swooping!

I'd prefer in bed...with your wife.
LaughLaughTongue

Jeez Andy, didn't know you wanted to get shot. Tongue

No, no really...but what a way to go!
You could put it on my tombstone:

Died in bed
With a hole in his head
In the wife that Fred wed.


Mark4  (D 8136)

Jun 1, 2012, 5:28 AM
Post #16 of 71 (3696 views)
Shortcut
Re: [nigel99] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

Here are the BPA requirements.

http://www.bpa.org.uk/forms/download/104/pdf

At 40 you need a doctor's signoff but it can be for up to 10 years. From 50 a doctor can sign you off for up to 3 years.


SansSuit  (D 21554)

Jun 1, 2012, 6:41 PM
Post #17 of 71 (3619 views)
Shortcut
Re: [Mark4] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
Here are the BPA requirements.

http://www.bpa.org.uk/forms/download/104/pdf

At 40 you need a doctor's signoff but it can be for up to 10 years. From 50 a doctor can sign you off for up to 3 years.

Very interesting. Thank you.


Premier skybytch  (D License)

Jun 2, 2012, 6:42 AM
Post #18 of 71 (3563 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ixlr82] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
I was on a jump with a 65 plus age jumper who landed on an aad fire and was found dead moments later. Since then I have followed the forums and noticed several similar circumstances. Jumper 'appeared' normal until breakoff. Next thing anybody knew, jumper landed unresponsive under an aad fired reserve or went in with nothing out. In Pauls case it was massive coronary failure. I suspect similar problems with recent cases.

I can't think of a better way to go. Track away from an awesome skydive, pull, die and let the AAD leave a pretty corpse for the funeral.

If a 20 year old has the right to take themselves out swooping, a 70 year old has the right to have a heart attack in freefall. Tongue


lvintw

Jun 2, 2012, 7:07 AM
Post #19 of 71 (3554 views)
Shortcut
Re: [skybytch] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

Quote:
If a 20 year old has the right to take themselves out swooping, a 70 year old has the right to have a heart attack in freefall.

The 70 year old is probably not going to take out another person in the process...


Andy9o8  (D License)

Jun 2, 2012, 3:43 PM
Post #20 of 71 (3526 views)
Shortcut
Re: [lvintw] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
Quote:
If a 20 year old has the right to take themselves out swooping, a 70 year old has the right to have a heart attack in freefall.

The 70 year old is probably not going to take out another person in the process...

Oh, shut up and stop killin' our buzz, man.


riggerrob  (D 14840)

Jun 3, 2012, 8:34 PM
Post #21 of 71 (3439 views)
Shortcut
Re: [nigel99] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

"
In reply to:
... I discovered that I have excersize induced asthma and a $5 puffer has literally changed my life. Really wish I had known 20 years ago...
"

......................................................................

Struth!
39 years ago I discovered that chewing gum, sucking on a hard candy or even just a small stone kept saliva flowing, kept my throat moist, bronchial tubes moist and reduced my exercise-induced asthma to almost nothing. I eventually competed in 10 km and 20 km cross-country running races.

Similarly, I have chewed gum on thousands of skydives ... primarily to help clear my inner ears with altitude changes.

However, when I went for my last cardio stress-test, the technician was afraid to allow me to chew gum (for fear of choking) and needed permission from the cardiologist (medical doctor) before I was allowed to chew gum. Towards the end of my treadmill test, I was striding at 160 beats per minute, more than most 54 year-old men can tolerate. The cardiologist reported no problems and complimented me on much better exercise tolerance than most men in their 50s.


nigel99  (D 1)

Jun 3, 2012, 8:48 PM
Post #22 of 71 (3433 views)
Shortcut
Re: [riggerrob] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
"
In reply to:
... I discovered that I have excersize induced asthma and a $5 puffer has literally changed my life. Really wish I had known 20 years ago...
"

......................................................................

Struth!
39 years ago I discovered that chewing gum, sucking on a hard candy or even just a small stone kept saliva flowing, kept my throat moist, bronchial tubes moist and reduced my exercise-induced asthma to almost nothing. I eventually competed in 10 km and 20 km cross-country running races.

Similarly, I have chewed gum on thousands of skydives ... primarily to help clear my inner ears with altitude changes.

However, when I went for my last cardio stress-test, the technician was afraid to allow me to chew gum (for fear of choking) and needed permission from the cardiologist (medical doctor) before I was allowed to chew gum. Towards the end of my treadmill test, I was striding at 160 beats per minute, more than most 54 year-old men can tolerate. The cardiologist reported no problems and complimented me on much better exercise tolerance than most men in their 50s.

Rob,

Really interesting that chewing gum works for you. Personally until the 'drug' nothing stopped it and I was just convinced I was very unfit.

I remember a person on dz.com getting totally crucified for suggesting chewing gum on skydives to someone else, so the tech wasn't aloneLaugh


Para5-0  (D 19054)

Jun 4, 2012, 3:34 AM
Post #23 of 71 (3413 views)
Shortcut
Re: [moggybean] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

In a recent incident, a great guy showed up at the DZ, he was 69 and full of life. He showed up on his Harley Road King and advised he made 30 or so jumps back in the 70's and wanted to get certified. He had his log book and pictures of him with a rig and belly mount on. (pretty cool). Well a few training tandems later and he was in my FJC.
I had some concern as he wasnt very limber, and he didnt respond as quickly as most. I explained it to him and he put in the time to memorize the dive flows and study on his down time, and really train hard on the ground. (persistent guy)

Well he made it to Cat C and repeated a few times before really nailing it. At that moment I thought I might have made the right decision to go forward with him. Great video and a smile ear to ear made us go back up for a Cat D. The dive went okay better than some, it was landing that went a bit haywire. He flew a nice patern into the wind and at flare time only went to his shoulders and in his words. "froze". He did PLF but hit rather hard. He and I knew he injured himself. A week later now he has pins in his pelvis from 4 fractures. Again, he didnt hit all that hard but his age probably was a severe factor. I have seen him several times now and he is still motivated but it looks like a long recovery for him.

Question is, How old is too old? I know it depends on each individual. I have seen some pretty fit older people. But is there a pressure on Instructors to try? Then you see the sos, and Joes and get motivated to help even if it takes longer but is it worth the risk? I have beaten myself up over this one and lost sleep but he assured me he would have done it regardless. Do some DZ's have an age restriction of AFF? I would love to see stats of when most of the JOES started and see if they are mostly jumpers from days of old or if any of them started later in life.
Tandems is a totally different picture, as every weekend we are taking 70,80, and even a 92 year old last year. Not a issue as we are introducing them to a great sport and giving them a memory.

Thoughts on how old is too old and if we should have age restrictions to starting? Or maybe have some sort of approval before starting.
I dont know.


obelixtim  (D 84)

Jun 4, 2012, 4:22 AM
Post #24 of 71 (3402 views)
Shortcut
Re: [Para5-0] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

Quote:
Question is, How old is too old? I know it depends on each individual.

I've always been of the opinion that these are adults and once they are aware of the risks, should be able to make their own decisions. They are big boys and girls, not babies....

Having said that, I make it quite clear that I will assess them during their training and if I have any doubt as to whether they are able to complete a safe skydive I will not allow them to jump solo.

They all seem to accept that, and trust my judgement either way. For that reason I am against a cut off point based solely on age.

I take a long hard look at them during their training, and any doubt in my mind results in a refusal. Its the same though for any solo candidate, no matter what age.


(This post was edited by obelixtim on Jun 4, 2012, 4:46 AM)


Premier wmw999  (D 6296)

Jun 4, 2012, 4:44 AM
Post #25 of 71 (3397 views)
Shortcut
Re: [obelixtim] elderly skydivers [In reply to] Can't Post

Thank you. These are adults who have a lifetime of making their own decisions behind them. We have the responsibility to assess them as individuals, for the individual jump they're doing.

My father lost much of his eyesight in his late 70's. He quit driving immediately, but kept riding his bicycle (low traffic times, low traffic areas) for another 7-8 years. Every now and then he'd come back bruised or scraped from having gone too close to a tree or something.

We knew that missing a car coming at him was a possibility. We also knew that we'd feel much worse for the driver of the car than for our dad. What better way to go than doing something everyone says you shouldn't be doing at your age?

Wendy P.


First page Previous page 1 2 3 Next page Last page  View All

Forums : Skydiving : Safety and Training

 


Search for (options)