Forums: Skydiving Disciplines: Canopy Relative Work:
Dragplanes and risers - critical?

 


morris

Apr 18, 2012, 8:19 AM
Post #1 of 12 (1424 views)
Shortcut
Dragplanes and risers - critical? Can't Post

Ive been told that dragplanes could put too much load/stress/force on the risers. Is that possible?? We are talking type 17 here if it comes to the risers and 1.6 loaded Storms regarding the canopies. I only know that after the second dragplane of the day in that configuration I had to take painkillers because my arms hurted very bad, even thou it wasnt any kind of serious injury, I couldnt even get out of my gear on my own, so there was really some kind of "tension in the system", way more - compared to a downplane. Any expertopinions out there?


topdocker  (D 12018)

Apr 18, 2012, 8:50 AM
Post #2 of 12 (1410 views)
Shortcut
Re: [morris] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
Ive been told that dragplanes could put too much load/stress/force on the risers. Is that possible?? We are talking type 17 here if it comes to the risers and 1.6 loaded Storms regarding the canopies. I only know that after the second dragplane of the day in that configuration I had to take painkillers because my arms hurted very bad, even thou it wasnt any kind of serious injury, I couldnt even get out of my gear on my own, so there was really some kind of "tension in the system", way more - compared to a downplane. Any expertopinions out there?

I don't see how you can have more force from a dragplane than you get with opening. There might be more force in a dragplane than in a downplane, but not a huge amount.

What kind of grip are you using that is putting that amount of tension on your shoulders?

top


morris

Apr 18, 2012, 9:18 AM
Post #3 of 12 (1406 views)
Shortcut
Re: [topdocker] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Quote:
I don't see how you can have more force from a dragplane than you get with opening.
Thats what I though myself as well, but I wanted to make sure...!

Quote:
What kind of grip are you using that is putting that amount of tension on your shoulders?
On that very jump the other guy had a "selfmade-velcro-thing" around his ankle I could get a grip on with my hands. Weve been "connected" by legs as well (no way to describe how) but by far the most of the tension had been "taken" by my arms (especially the upperarms hurted so bad afterwards). While on that jump Ive been completely upside down, on the jump before a little bit was missing to be completely "over the top" of my onw chute and on that one (the one before) I was holding on to his lowerharnes with just one hand, carrying most of the tension that way. Maybe that resulted in some very asymetrical tension on my body that as a result didnt like to do it again just an hour later...?!


Premier faulknerwn  (D 17441)
Moderator
Apr 18, 2012, 10:35 AM
Post #4 of 12 (1400 views)
Shortcut
Re: [morris] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

I have done tons of those jumps and never noticed anything different between drag planes and down planes as far as tension. I wouldn't worry about your risers breaking.

My guess is that the storms have such an extreme angle of attack that it makes for more pressure? Almost all of mine were done on Lightnings which are more mellow..


topdocker  (D 12018)

Apr 18, 2012, 12:30 PM
Post #5 of 12 (1384 views)
Shortcut
Re: [faulknerwn] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
I have done tons of those jumps and never noticed anything different between drag planes and down planes as far as tension. I wouldn't worry about your risers breaking.

My guess is that the storms have such an extreme angle of attack that it makes for more pressure? Almost all of mine were done on Lightnings which are more mellow..

I did a bunch with Expresses which also have a pronounced angle of attack, never found the need for artificial aids for the grip. Any grip that requires a ton of arm strength needs to be reworked. Avoid the "death straps" as well.

top


morris

Apr 19, 2012, 11:46 AM
Post #6 of 12 (1320 views)
Shortcut
Re: [topdocker] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

Does it already qualifiy being called deathstrap if Im holding onto it only with my bare hands? Any reason why I cant let go at any time?? Where can I find detailed information on a reasonable kind of leggrip?


topdocker  (D 12018)

Apr 19, 2012, 10:03 PM
Post #7 of 12 (1282 views)
Shortcut
Re: [morris] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
Does it already qualifiy being called deathstrap if Im holding onto it only with my bare hands? Any reason why I cant let go at any time?? Where can I find detailed information on a reasonable kind of leggrip?

Any type of strap that a twist or misrouting can cause failure to release is a deathstrap. Over the years I have been able to mess up some pretty good looking systems rather easily, and if you think you can get a hook knife out and cut one of those as you are spiralling down, you might be having your last surprise.

If it offers no mechanical advantage but merely and extended hand hold, then that would be okay. However, you have made it so one of your hands is occupied and the leg muscles are bigger and can handle more tension. (and the tension is directed down the long axis of the body, not away from the shoulder joint, possibly damaging the joint)

The double leg wrap works great and we have used it for tri-by-sides even. I will see if my teammates can get some dirt dive photos this weekend, and I can figure out how to post them....

top


pchapman  (D 1014)

Apr 20, 2012, 5:35 AM
Post #8 of 12 (1269 views)
Shortcut
Re: [topdocker] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
The double leg wrap works great

Is that the one also known as a parabatic leg grip?

(I'm not in tune with modern CRW practices.)


morris

Apr 21, 2012, 2:04 AM
Post #9 of 12 (1232 views)
Shortcut
Re: [topdocker] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

Some pics would be awesome! And very welcome!
If possible not just pics of the double leg wrap "in place", but also how you get into it, somekind of a step by step "how to do it" "picturemap"...


pchapman  (D 1014)

Apr 21, 2012, 5:19 AM
Post #10 of 12 (1228 views)
Shortcut
Re: [morris] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

While I'm guessing that the double leg wrap is the same thing as the parabatic grip, I don't know for sure.

In any case, for the parabatic leg grip: There are a couple peoples' descriptions and one pic I posted a while back in a thread on downplanes, starting here: http://www.dropzone.com/...post=3369487#3369487


cmdrflyr

Apr 26, 2012, 9:48 PM
Post #11 of 12 (1116 views)
Shortcut
Re: [pchapman] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

A wise man once said... "hit the G.Y.M".


BrianM  (D 661)

Jun 7, 2012, 5:30 PM
Post #12 of 12 (948 views)
Shortcut
Re: [topdocker] Dragplanes and risers - critical? [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
The double leg wrap works great and we have used it for tri-by-sides even. I will see if my teammates can get some dirt dive photos this weekend, and I can figure out how to post them....

I posted some photos of tri-by-sides with the parabatics grip a few years ago here:

http://www.dropzone.com/...post=2498160#2498160



Forums : Skydiving Disciplines : Canopy Relative Work

 


Search for (options)