Forums: Skydiving: Safety and Training:
Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall

 


Poll: Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall
Yes 35 / 56%
No 12 / 19%
Stupid idea 16 / 25%
63 total votes
 
wayneflorida  (D 30566)

Jun 27, 2011, 1:10 PM
Post #1 of 12 (1723 views)
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Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall Can't Post

Who teaches students or new jumpers to practice reserve pull at terminal in freefall.

Do you think it is worth while?

Someone had to go to reserve because he could not throw out and I realize that I have never practiced reserve pull in the air. Sure on the ground and suspended in a harness, but never in the air at terminal on belly trying to be stable.

So over the last couple years I do so sometimes on solo jumps.

Of course I realize that if having to go to reserve, to pull is first even if unstable. Don't want people to think that being stable is more important than pulling.


Southern_Man  (C License)

Jun 27, 2011, 1:16 PM
Post #2 of 12 (1702 views)
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Re: [wayneflorida] Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

I have practiced looking at, finding and touching my handles at terminal a few times. I believe it was recommended to me by a more experienced jumper but I can't remember who it was.


Scrumpot  (D License)

Jun 27, 2011, 2:31 PM
Post #3 of 12 (1638 views)
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Re: [wayneflorida] Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

What - exactly - do you mean by "practice"?

All you need is to catch your thumb in that d-handle one time inadvertently too... and: OOPS! Blush Wink


jjudd  (D 31065)

Jun 27, 2011, 7:56 PM
Post #4 of 12 (1544 views)
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Re: [Scrumpot] Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

touch but better hope u dont pull accidently. Puds are a much different story then the D ring ( i wouldnt wanna touch that )


tdog  (D 28800)

Jun 28, 2011, 6:01 PM
Post #5 of 12 (1408 views)
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Re: [jjudd] Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

Quote:
touch but better hope u dont pull accidently. Puds are a much different story then the D ring ( i wouldnt wanna touch that )

I disagree about touching.

DRings need a bit of force to come out, and then they need a good pull to activate the reserve.

Touching your handles is a good way to learn you can do it.

The worst thing that happens - you actually fire your reserve. This practice should be happening on a solo jump anyway - so even if the one in a million chance you somehow put 10+ pounds of force on your D ring to fire your reserve, nothing "too bad" will happen anyway.

I know more than one person who has had to pull their reserve at terminal - why not get used to flying in the body position required to pull that handle.


skr  (D 981)

Jun 29, 2011, 8:58 PM
Post #6 of 12 (1317 views)
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Re: [wayneflorida] Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

> Who teaches students or new jumpers to practice reserve pull at terminal in freefall.

I do something that includes that, which is to
practice falling and feeling comfortable in the
"pull position".

The motivation is that pull time is maybe the
most stressful time in a jump and it helps to
develop a feeling of being in control.

There are several versions depending on the
student.

One is to jump out and face each other, and
then put your left hand and arm up above
your head, arm straight and hand straight
above your head.

("Above" is ambiguous in freefall, but when
(we're standing there dirt diving your left hand
(and arm are straight up above your head.

Then, flying with one arm and hand and both
legs, take your right hand and arm out of the
slip stream. Put it on your chest or something.

Now get used to flying with one arm and two
legs.

Sometimes we just hang out that way, depending
on the student we may do 360's.

Next is touching the main and cutaway handle
and reserve handle.

You don't take a grip, your hand is open and flat
and just kind of pat each one and feel where it
is and what it feels like.

So maybe pat your main handle for 5 sec, then
pat your cutaway handle for 5 sec, then your
reserve handle.

There are lots of variations depending on feedback
from the student when you get down.

We also do the mirror image, right hand above
your head and patting an imaginary left handed
main and then the reserve and the cutaway.

Skr


pchapman  (D 1014)

Jun 30, 2011, 5:13 AM
Post #7 of 12 (1295 views)
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Re: [wayneflorida] Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

At one dz I'm at, handles touches and practice pulls are practiced by students when they are a little more advanced.

It seems a decent compromise: Students get to touch their handles in freefall, but don't do it so early in their progression that they are likely to go terribly unstable or pull a handle accidentally.

The practice pulls in freefall are introduced down the line when they transition from the student gear to the rental style gear. (Two handles rather than SOS. This applies both to PFF and traditional progression students). All novices and junior jumpers are also supposed to do a survival skills jump at the start of the season.

Practice pulls in freefall get people used to the sudden head down dip that may happen depending on arm position. They are also supposed to do a handles touch during opening during that kind of jump, as if they were having a mal on opening. It's good for checking where handles might have shifted.


hackish  (No License)

Jul 2, 2011, 4:00 PM
Post #8 of 12 (1118 views)
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Re: Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

Risks:
- accidental reserve deployment - below someone too? A freebag in freefall would hurt!
- ending up with a loose handle - possibly a 2 out on main deployment.

There are lots of things that could go wrong. I think practise on the ground is good - a place where it doesn't have significant risks associated with it. In general, I think safety "improvements" should be focused around what the satistics say are killing people.

-Michael


wayneflorida  (D 30566)

Jul 5, 2011, 8:23 AM
Post #9 of 12 (1039 views)
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Re: [hackish] Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
Risks:
- accidental reserve deployment - below someone too? A freebag in freefall would hurt!
- ending up with a loose handle - possibly a 2 out on main deployment.

There are lots of things that could go wrong. I think practise on the ground is good - a place where it doesn't have significant risks associated with it. In general, I think safety "improvements" should be focused around what the satistics say are killing people.

-Michael

In will clarify my statement "praticing reserve pull"
The intent is to touch your reserve handle but not practice the pull part.
Can one stay stable during the reach as one would do during normal BOC throw out.
I don't see this as dangerous when done on a solo jump.


TitaniumLegs  (D 19246)

Jul 5, 2011, 7:11 PM
Post #10 of 12 (977 views)
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Re: [wayneflorida] Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

I teach 3 handle in-sequence touch in freefall as a drill after AFF and before A-license. My first reserve ride was a total (PC handle pulled off the PC due to tight PC pouch) and obviously had to pull the reserve at terminal.


tbrown  (D 6533)

Jul 9, 2011, 12:49 PM
Post #11 of 12 (885 views)
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Re: [wayneflorida] Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

My reserve handle is a steel D-ring and from time to time I'll reach and touch it. So far, it's always been right where I expect it to be. Which came in handy when I had a PCIT mal back in January.


lintern  (C 104479)

Jul 14, 2011, 12:44 PM
Post #12 of 12 (754 views)
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Re: [tbrown] Pacticing reserve pull during terminal freefall [In reply to] Can't Post

The Breakaway DVD recommends 'touching' all your handles when in freefall to learn where they are located whilst belly to earth.

There is footage in the DVD showing a skydiver doing this.

I tried it once and think its a good idea. Not just to reassure yourself that you can find your handles, but also that you can remain stable when doing so. Remember the first thing you should do is 'look' for your handles.

Its better to to try touching your handles whilst high up, rather than at pull height with a total malfunction.

Here is a link to the DVD....

http://www.dzsports.co.uk/...val-series-136-p.asp

It also explains how to deal with all malfunctions, including the dreaded horse shoe mal or two canopies out.


(This post was edited by lintern on Jul 14, 2011, 12:45 PM)



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