Forums: Archive: 2008-2009 USPA BOD Elections:
"education not regulation"

 


Premier skybytch  (D License)

Nov 6, 2008, 1:33 PM
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"education not regulation" Can't Post

I'm curious what those who are using the phrase "education not regulation" intend to propose/support on the "education" side of the catch phrase.

Anybody?


diablopilot  (D License)

Nov 7, 2008, 8:12 AM
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Re: [skybytch] "education not regulation" [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't think I've used the catchphrase, and I don't know if anyone who does has a plan behind it, but I'll take a stab at what it means to me as a skydiver and instructor.

I like the basic sentiment of the phrase (or at least the way I choose to interpret it), its as if to say, "Let's improve the quality of skydiver and create a safety conscious community that won't need regulation."

It's a nice thought.

But how do we make it happen? Once a student has graduated, found a spiffy new jumpsuit, and color matched rig, dumped thousands of dollars on training and equipment, and has been granted the title of "Skydiver", the next thing they look for is the acceptance and approval of their peers. (Maybe they want to have some fun falling out of airplanes too.) The last thing they want is to be treated like a student. They will chafe at the bit for some time, probably till they get a couple years and a thousand or two jumps under their belt. None of us has ever been immune to this feeling, we've all felt like we knew it, and resented someone for pointing it out to us.

I'll use the hot bed of canopy collisions and landing incidents as an example.

I believe what we are feeling now is a backlash of the new AFF instructor rating, and the plethora of instructors it created. As the "judgmental evaluation" of candidates fell away in favor of the "criteria" evaluation, there were areas overlooked, possibly because it was expected that the "old guard" of instructors would "educate" the new.

That just didn't happen. At least not in the volume that it was needed.

This results in some AFF instructors that have a general misunderstanding of what is truly needed of them. It becomes somehow acceptable to teach a student some basic freefall skills, wrestle them through that freefall, get them under a functioning parachute, radio them to a controlled crash, write a line or two of gobbledygook in a logbook, move on to the next "customer". "That'llbethirtydollarsbytheway, seeyounextSaturday."

Very little time is spent on the "survival skills" of skydiving. Let's face it, how often does someone die as a result of poor freefall ability? Even in the name of the rating "Accelerated Freefall Instructor" we do the instructor a disservice by misleading them into which one of those words really deserves the focus.

So the sport ends up having an increase in incidents of canopy collisions, and fatalities resulting from them shock the community. Skydivers are shocked that they can die even while doing everything right. The loose friends, and they don't know where to turn to find answers. Often they are the instructors who don't know where things went wrong, how that friend or former student of theirs could have hosed it so bad.

But they do know a couple things: The risk of it happening to them scares them, and the want to eliminate that risk.

Regulation.

Sure, if they can make a rule that bans anything other than a safe approach to landing, and set rules on wing loading then they'll be no way anyone can get hurt. I mean they'll HAVE to follow the rules, right?

Rules don't work. Not by themselves anyway. The average person is surrounded by rules everyday, and doesn't waste a moment of worry about those they don't feel apply to themselves, or that they don't agree with. They toss cigarette butts on the ground, they speed, and talk on their cell phones. Skydivers are no different; they jump smaller mains before they are qualified, strap on camera helmets before they have the experience, and do tandem videos well before the RULES say they can.

Rules work only when nearly everybody agrees they are good for everybody, when everyone has a desire to abide by them, when they can be enforced, and when people are willing to enforce them ahead of other priorities (like money), and when the bad boy image of breaking them isn't glorified. Most skydivers know from even their earliest jumps you cant win when playing chicken with the ground in freefall, so the rule is easy to enforce, however a "miss is as good as a mile" so canopy patterns are harder to enforce because no one visualizes themselves in a collision. Rules that work are the ones that can't be beat.

Well how does one get to this utopia? This ideal condition of harmony amongst all skydivers so that when one simply says "tisk tisk", the offender bows his head in shame, throws himself at the feet of his peers, and begs for enlightenment so that one day he too can shine with the inner light of purity and knowledge. (Ok, I went a little overboard there. Laugh)

Education.

Back to our post student status, fly gear-wearing, rockstar. We're almost wasting our time trying to talk to some of these people, however if we as instructors, spent more time with them as students, if we as instructors has the knowledge and tools to train them safely, if we as instructors truly understood that it is not as important to teach someone to freefall with grace, as it is to teach them how to fly and land a parachute in a manner that keeps themselves and those around them from injury or worse, and if we as instructors could lose the same cocksure attitude our recent students have and realize we're not experts, we're just students a little further along the path ourselves.

The DZ educates the students.

Let's have the USPA educate the educators.

How about "education so regulation works"?
.


(This post was edited by diablopilot on Nov 7, 2008, 8:23 AM)


diablopilot  (D License)

Nov 7, 2008, 10:53 PM
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Re: [diablopilot] "education not regulation" [In reply to] Can't Post

I really need to proofread better. Sorry about that everyone.


airtwardo  (D License)

Nov 7, 2008, 10:55 PM
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Re: [diablopilot] "education not regulation" [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
I really need to proofread better. Sorry about that everyone.


No worries...I got the intended message, you got my intended VOTE! Smile


popsjumper  (D 999999999)

Nov 12, 2008, 5:12 AM
Post #5 of 10 (1813 views)
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Re: [airtwardo] "education not regulation" [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
In reply to:
I really need to proofread better. Sorry about that everyone.


No worries...I got the intended message, you got my intended VOTE! Smile

And given your webpage info and other discussions I've read involving you, +1.


popsjumper  (D 999999999)

Nov 12, 2008, 5:23 AM
Post #6 of 10 (1809 views)
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Re: [skybytch] "education not regulation" [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
I'm curious what those who are using the phrase "education not regulation" intend to propose/support on the "education" side of the catch phrase.

Anybody?

On the flip side...

The assumption here seems to be that those getting hurt are not educated.

I submit that education is not the issue. I think that attitude is the issue. JP points to that in his post.

I don't think that there's anything we can do, education nor regulation, that's going to change anything in the short term.

Call me pessimistic, but I'm almost to the point of saying write off the existing hazardous people and focus on the young ones coming up.

JP makes excellent points regarding Instructor focus. We, as Instructors could go a long way towards minimizing the number of hazardous people by working more closely with the youngsters and helping them develop a more safety-conscious attitude right from the get-go.

If it takes re-training the Instructors, them I'm all for it. I'm sickened by seeing Instructors everywhere thinking their job is only about air skills....and DZOs that let them get away with it.


Premier NWFlyer  (D 29960)

Nov 25, 2008, 7:18 AM
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Re: [skybytch] "education not regulation" [In reply to] Can't Post

I wonder if this is the type of education they're talking about?


diablopilot  (D License)

Nov 25, 2008, 8:48 AM
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Re: [NWFlyer] "education not regulation" [In reply to] Can't Post

sigh.Unsure


catfishhunter  (D 28796)

Nov 28, 2008, 2:27 PM
Post #9 of 10 (1507 views)
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Re: [NWFlyer] "education not regulation" [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
I wonder if this is the type of education they're talking about?

Correct me if i'm wrong but I remember somewhere that jumpng from the rail is really frowned upon at the bridge? If so WTF does miles think he is doing not only jumping himself but putting sending someone else off it for their second base jump. Yeah I want the person (or anyone associated with) running the USPACrazy


popsjumper  (D 999999999)

Dec 12, 2008, 4:23 AM
Post #10 of 10 (1368 views)
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Re: [skybytch] "education not regulation" [In reply to] Can't Post

You can fix ignorance with education. The educational opportunities are out there already for anyone wishing to learn OR teach. Unfortunately, it's apparent that those opportunities are not being taken as well as could be...both by jumpers AND Instructors.

You can fix stupidity with regulation, if and only if, it comes attached to enforcement. It's all to painfully obvious that current regulations are being ignored simply because of the lack of enforcement. The responsibility is already out there. We're ALL responsible but where is the accountability? Very few places hold jumpers accountable for their actions...very little enforcement.

Nothing is going to change until DZOs man-up and enforce the rules no matter how much education and/or regulation you introduce. DZO doesn't want to be the "bad guy"? Empower the S&TA then...like he should be empowered already. That's what he's there for.



Forums : Archive : 2008-2009 USPA BOD Elections

 


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