Forums: Skydiving: Safety and Training:
Know where you are and where you can go.

 


MakeItHappen

Mar 6, 2005, 7:16 PM
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Know where you are and where you can go. Can't Post

Know where you are and where you can go.

There is an over-used adage that 'History repeats itself. Those that do not know history will repeat it.'

It really makes me sad and extremely frustrated when experienced and inexperienced jumpers do low turns because they did not know where they were (up high) and where they could go (up high).

The number one way to determine where you are and where you can go is the use of the projected landing point. This is also know as the 'accuracy trick' - a name I eschew because it implies esoteric knowledge. I like the 'stationary point' better, but that name does not reflect the projected landing point if you descend through doglegs.

When the winds pick up at Perris, I head into the wind once under a good canopy. A slight drawback of this is that I am heading in the opposite direction of most everyone else on the load. I'm usually in the first group, since I mostly do RW. I have a lot of people passing me around 2K. They are going South and I am going North (or visa versa). The big advantage is that I can land by the gate with no one around me. Everyone else all went too far downwind and could not make it back. That tells me that a LARGE number of jumpers cannot predict where they will land.

If you have a long spot or the winds picked up is NOT a reason to go in.

There is no reason for someone to die because they have a long spot and then subsequently do a low turn to avoid an obstacle. There is no reason for someone to die if the winds come up and then do a low turn to avoid an obstacle.

There is no reason jumpers need to die in these situations.

I STRONGLY suggest reading
Get-Home-itis
High Wind Landing Approaches

I recently added a new section to Get-Home-itis about how to see the projected landing point. This was prompted by someone's comment about not being able to see it.

I'll mention also that the articles on SPSJ are there because the same questions keep arising. I'm too lazy to rewrite a reply for each person that asks. I write a general article that addresses many people's concerns and then reference the article.

I wish jumpers would stop giving me things to write about.

And for extra measure try out
Altitude Awareness
Malfunction Junction
Wake Up Call


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