Forums: Skydiving: Safety and Training:
Jump Run Direction

 

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diverdriver  (D 19012)

Feb 21, 2004, 7:31 AM
Post #51 of 57 (403 views)
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Re: [hoym] Jump Run Direction [In reply to] Can't Post

Quote:
Who knows how would be the best way to implement a safe delay between groups. Continue researching and teaching I guess.

Research has already been done! Just gotta read it now. Go to John Kallend's site.


edit: ooops, beat me to it.


(This post was edited by diverdriver on Feb 21, 2004, 7:32 AM)


vonSanta

Feb 21, 2004, 2:12 PM
Post #52 of 57 (392 views)
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Re: [kallend] Jump Run Direction [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
In reply to:

Who knows how would be the best way to implement a safe delay between groups.


-mh.

Me.

http://www.iit.edu/~kallend/skydive/ and click on "Resources"

What I love about Kallend is his modesty.

Feel free to add that to your sig Professor Tongue

Seriously though, Kallends resources made me see the light on various things. Excellent stuff.


(This post was edited by vonSanta on Feb 21, 2004, 2:12 PM)


GroundZero  (A 9044)

Feb 22, 2004, 12:20 AM
Post #53 of 57 (375 views)
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Re: [ZoneRat] Jump Run Direction [In reply to] Can't Post

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Bernoulli effect, right?

Bernoulli's is a school teachers easy way to teach what he/she does not understand. Not generally accepted by all. But you learned it above any other aerodynamic theory... and it proves itself well.

Good questions, keep asking...

(Personally I don't buy into Bernoulli, but that's a whole different thread!)


Chris


GroundZero  (A 9044)

Feb 22, 2004, 12:28 AM
Post #54 of 57 (374 views)
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Re: [kallend] Jump Run Direction [In reply to] Can't Post

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Imagine you are in a hot air balloon floating above clouds so you can't see the ground. Would you be able to tell the wind speed and direction by, say, smoking a cigarette

You can't smoke in a balloon! Lots of flammable gas there...

unless you fly with me... shit that big flame overhead is more likely to cause damage than my lil smoke!

Chris


Premier quade  (D 22635)
Moderator
Feb 22, 2004, 12:39 AM
Post #55 of 57 (369 views)
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Re: [GroundZero] Jump Run Direction [In reply to] Can't Post

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(Personally I don't buy into Bernoulli, but that's a whole different thread!)

Like the Knights said when they rode up to Camelot, "It's only a model".

If you consider the fact that a LOT of people fly their canopies at only the most rudimentary and vague understanding of why they fly, then clearly it's not the be all and end all of flight. In fact, I don't think too many birds understand Bernoulli's Principle, but they fly just fine. Further, Bernoulli will -probably- get you through just about all of your civilian flying knowledge requirements other than CFI and ATP.

It's only a model, but it works well enough for most folk's understanding and application purposes.


(This post was edited by quade on Feb 22, 2004, 12:40 AM)


GroundZero  (A 9044)

Feb 22, 2004, 1:01 AM
Post #56 of 57 (363 views)
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Re: [quade] Jump Run Direction [In reply to] Can't Post

Exactly...

Well said Paul.



Chris


kallend  (D 23151)

Feb 22, 2004, 4:29 PM
Post #57 of 57 (342 views)
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Re: [GroundZero] Jump Run Direction [In reply to] Can't Post

In reply to:
Quote:
Bernoulli effect, right?

Bernoulli's is a school teachers easy way to teach what he/she does not understand. Not generally accepted by all. But you learned it above any other aerodynamic theory... and it proves itself well.

Good questions, keep asking...

(Personally I don't buy into Bernoulli, but that's a whole different thread!)


Chris

Lift is produced when downward momentum is imparted to air passing over a canopy or wing: Newton's 2nd law, force = rate of change of momentum, and 3rd Law, action and reaction etc. the air exerts an equal force on the canopy.

Lift is also produced because the dynamic pressure on the bottom of the canopy exceeds that on the top surface, as explained by Bernoulli's principle. It is very easy to verify these pressure differences in a wind tunnel experiment. Of course, these pressure differences also impart downward momentum to the air!

They both predict exactly the same thing. Arguing that one is more correct than the other only shows incomplete understanding.

The derivation of Bernoulli's equation starts with Newton's laws. There's no way one is more correct than the other.


(This post was edited by kallend on Feb 22, 2004, 4:35 PM)


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